Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World

Author: Haruki Murakami

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 416

View: 517

Hyperkinetic and relentlessly inventive, Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World is Haruki Murakami’s deep dive into the very nature of consciousness. Across two parallel narratives, Murakami draws readers into a mind-bending universe in which Lauren Bacall, Bob Dylan, a split-brained data processor, a deranged scientist, his shockingly undemure granddaughter, and various thugs, librarians, and subterranean monsters collide to dazzling effect. What emerges is a novel that is at once hilariously funny and a deeply serious meditation on the nature and uses of the mind.

The Fantastic in Modern Japanese Literature

The Subversion of Modernity

Author: Susan Napier

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 272

View: 866

Modern Japan's repressed anxieties, fears and hopes come to the surface in the fantastic. A close analysis of fantasy fiction, film and comics reveals the ambivalence felt by many Japanese towards the success story of the nation in the twentieth century. The Fantastic in Modern Japanese Literature explores the dark side to Japanese literature and Japanese society. It takes in the nightmarish future depicted in the animated film masterpiece, Akira, and the pastoral dream worlds created by Japan's Nobel Prize winning author Oe Kenzaburo. A wide range of fantasists, many discussed here in English for the first time, form the basis for a ground-breaking analysis of utopias, dystopias, the disturbing relationship between women, sexuality and modernity, and the role of the alien in the fantastic.

Novels by Haruki Murakami

1Q84, After Dark (Novel), a Wild Sheep Chase, Dance Dance Dance (Novel), Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End Of

Author: Source Wikipedia

Publisher: University-Press.org

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 20

View: 529

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Commentary (novels not included). Pages: 18. Chapters: 1Q84, After Dark (novel), A Wild Sheep Chase, Dance Dance Dance (novel), Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World, Hear the Wind Sing, Kafka on the Shore, Norwegian Wood (novel), Pinball, 1973, South of the Border, West of the Sun, Sputnik Sweetheart, The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle. Excerpt: 1Q84 (One Q Eighty-Four or ichi-kew-hachi-yon Ichi-Ky -Hachi-Yon)) is a novel by Haruki Murakami, first published in three volumes in Japan in 2009-10. The novel quickly became a sensation, with its first printing selling out the day it was released, and reaching sales of one million within a month. The English language edition of all three volumes, with the first two volumes translated by Jay Rubin and the third by Philip Gabriel, was released in North America and the United Kingdom on October 25, 2011. An excerpt from the novel, "Town of Cats," appeared in the September 5, 2011 issue of The New Yorker magazine. The first chapter of 1Q84 has also been read as an excerpt at Selected Shorts. The novel was originally published in Japan in three hardcover volumes by Shinchosha. Book 1 and Book 2 were both published on May 29, 2009; Book 3 was published on April 16, 2010. In English translation, Knopf published the novel in the United States in a single volume on October 25, 2011. In the United Kingdom the novel was published by Harvill Secker in two volumes. The first volume, containing Books 1 and 2, was published on October 18, 2011, followed by the second volume, containing Book 3, published on October 25, 2011. The cover for the Knopf edition, featuring a transparent dust jacket, was created by Chip Kidd. Murakami spent four years writing the novel after coming up with the opening sequence and title. The title is a play on the Japanese pronunciation of the year 1984, a reference to George...

Melancholy and the Archive

Trauma, History and Memory in the Contemporary Novel

Author: Jonathan Boulter

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 224

View: 630

Melancholy and the Archive examines how trauma, history and memory are represented in key works of major contemporary writers such as David Mitchell, Paul Auster, Haruki Murakami and Jose Saramago. The book explores how these authors construct crucial relationships between sites of memory-the archive becomes a central trope here-and the self that has been subjected to various traumas, various losses. The archive-be it a bureaucratic office (Saramago), an underground bunker (Auster), a geographical space or landscape (Mitchell) or even a hole (Murakami)-becomes the means by which the self attempts to preserve and conserve his or her sense of history even as the economy of trauma threatens to erase the grounds of such preservation: as the subject or self is threatened so the archive becomes a festishized site wherein history is housed, accommodated, created, even fabricated. The archive, in Freudian terms, becomes a space of melancholy precisely as the subject preserves not only a personal history or a cultures history, but also the history of the traumas that necessitates the creation of the archive as such.

Postmodern, Feminist and Postcolonial Currents in Contemporary Japanese Culture

A Reading of Murakami Haruki, Yoshimoto Banana, Yoshimoto Takaaki and Karatani Kojin

Author: Fuminobu Murakami

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 613

Using the Euro-American theoretical framework of postmodernism, feminism and post-colonialism, this book analyses the fictional and critical work of four contemporary Japanese writers; Murakami Haruki, Yoshimoto Banana, Yoshimoto Takaaki and Karatani Kojin. In addition the author reconsiders this Euro-American theory by looking back on it from the perspective of Japanese literary work. Presenting outstanding analysis of Japanese intellectuals and writers who have received little attention in the West, the book also includes an extensive and comprehensive bibliography making it essential reading for those studying Japanese literature, Japanese studies and Japanese thinkers.

Apocalypse in Contemporary Japanese Science Fiction

Author: M. Tanaka

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 189

View: 501

Starting with the history of apocalyptic tradition in the West and focusing on modern Japanese apocalyptic science fiction in manga, anime, and novels, Motoko Tanaka shows how science fiction reflected and coped with the devastation in Japanese national identity after 1945.

The Cambridge Companion to Utopian Literature

Author: Gregory Claeys

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 295

View: 527

Using a combination of historical and thematic approaches, this volume engages with the fascinating and complex genre of utopian literature.

1Q84

Author: Haruki Murakami

Publisher: Random House

ISBN:

Category: Japan

Page: 925

View: 539

The year is 1Q84. This is the real world, there is no doubt about that. But in this world, there are two moons in the sky. In this world, the fates of two people, Tengo and Aomame, are closely intertwined. They are each, in their own way, doing something very dangerous. And in this world, there seems no way to save them both. Something extraordinary is starting.

Nation and Region in Modern American and European Fiction

Author: Thomas O. Beebee

Publisher: Purdue University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 200

View: 665

Several canonical works of literary fiction have provided their readers with verbal maps that in their depictions of boundary spaces construct indirect images of national territory and geography. Beebee analyses fictional texts as a 'discursive territoriality' that shape readers' notions of national and regional belonging.

History and Repetition

Author: Kojin Karatani

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 727

Kojin Karatani wrote the essays in History and Repetition during a time of radical historical change, triggered by the collapse of the Cold War and the death of the Showa emperor in 1989. Reading Karl Marx in an original way, Karatani developed a theory of history based on the repetitive cycle of crises attending the expansion and transformation of capital. His work led to a rigorous analysis of political, economic, and literary forms of representation that recast historical events as a series of repeated forms forged in the transitional moments of global capitalism. History and Repetition cemented Karatani's reputation as one of Japan's premier thinkers, capable of traversing the fields of philosophy, political economy, history, and literature in his work. The first complete translation of History and Repetition into English, undertaken with the cooperation of Karatani himself, this volume opens with his innovative reading of The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte, tracing Marx's early theoretical formulation of the state. Karatani follows with a study of violent crises as they recur after major transitions of power, developing his theory of historical repetition and introducing a groundbreaking interpretation of fascism (in both Europe and Japan) as the spectral return of the absolutist monarch in the midst of a crisis of representative democracy. For Karatani, fascism represents the most violent materialization of the repetitive mechanism of history. Yet he also seeks out singularities that operate outside the brutal inevitability of historical repetition, whether represented in literature or, more precisely, in the process of literature's demise. Closely reading the works of Oe Kenzaburo, Mishima Yukio, Nakagami Kenji, and Murakami Haruki, Karatani compares the recurrent and universal with the singular and unrepeatable, while advancing a compelling theory of the decline of modern literature. Merging theoretical arguments with a concrete analysis of cultural and intellectual history, Karatani's essays encapsulate a brilliant, multidisciplinary perspective on world history.