Handley Page Halifax

1939 onwards (all marks)

Author: Jonathan Falconer

Publisher: Haynes Publishing UK

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 192

View: 260

The Halifax became the second of the new generation of four-engine heavy bombers to enter service with RAF Bomber Command in the Second World War. It flew its first offensive operation in March 1941 and by 1944 it had become the exclusive equipment for Bomber Command's 4 Group and 6 (Canadian) Group, as well as being used in smaller numbers by 100 (Bomber Support) Group. The Halifax flew on virtually all the main raids of the night offensive between 1942 and 1945 and the last occasion when Bomber Command Halifaxes operated in strength against the enemy was on 25 April 1945.

Bomber Command Operations Manual

Insights into the organisation, equipment, men, machines and tactics of RAF Bomber Command 1939-1945

Author: Jonathan Falconer

Publisher: Haynes Publishing UK

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 192

View: 283

Night after night for six years of war, RAF Bomber Command's squadrons pounded away at the cities of Nazi Germany in a determined effort to bring the Third Reich to its knees. Pitted against Bomber Harris's aircrews and aircraft were some of the most effective and deadly defenses the world had seen up until then. For Bomber Command to launch a 'maximum effort' raid on the Ruhr by night, or a low-level strike on a target in enemy occupied Europe by day, it involved a huge amount of planning. Who decided what to bomb? Why, when and where were bomber airfields built? How was the overall command structure organized, from the Air Council down to individual squadron level? Who were the commanders and who were the men that made up the rank and file of the Command? How did the RAF train its bomber crews? What aircraft did they fly and what weapons did they use? How was a raid planned and once it was launched what happened? How was the effectiveness of a raid and bomber tactics analyzed afterwards? How did the RAF go about tracing the 'missing' (47,000 men 'failed to return' from operations)? How were damaged bombers repaired and made good again for operations? Useful appendices include a Bomber Command War Diary listing key events 1939-1945, squadrons and their commanders, an a-to-z of bomber airfields, and sample orders of battle from 1939, 1943 and 1945. Fully illustrated with some 300 photographs, the Bomber Command Operations Manual gives a compelling insight into the workings of one of the most powerful instruments of 20th century warfare.

Short Stirling Units of World War 2

Author: Jonathan Falconer

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 96

View: 854

Of the RAF's trio of four-engined heavy bombers in World War 2, the mighty Short Stirling was the first to enter service in August 1940. From its first raid in February 1941, the Stirling was at the forefront of the British night bombing offensive against Germany before unacceptably high losses forced its relegation to second-line duties later in the war. In its modified form as the Mark IV the Stirling fulfilled vital roles with the RAF as a paratroop transport and glider tug on D-Day, at Arnhem and on the Rhine crossing as well as flying countless Special Duties operations over Occupied Europe and Norway. Its last gasp was in 1948-49 when a handful of Mk Vs were acquired by the Royal Egyptian Air Force to bomb Israel in the First Arab–Israeli War. Containing numerous first-hand combat accounts from the crews that flew the bomber and detailed profile artwork, Short Stirling Units of World War 2 uncovers the history of one of the RAF's greatest World War 2 bombers.

Royal Air Force 100 Technical Innovations Manual

Author: Jonathan Falconer

Publisher: Haynes Publishing UK

ISBN:

Category: Transportation

Page: 224

View: 580

To celebrate the RAF’s first 100 years, this Haynes Manual showcases the top 100 technical innovations that have been used and/or devised by the Service over the past century--some large like the variable geometry (or swing) wing, and others that were small but still vital like the dambusters’ hand-held wooden triangulation bomb sight--and describes how they worked.

Junkers JU 87 Stuka Owners' Workshop Manual

All marks and variants (1935 - 45)

Author: Jonathan Falconer

Publisher: Haynes Publishing UK

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 192

View: 400

With its cranked wing and vulture-like looks the Junkers Ju 87 Stuka dive-bomber came to symbolise the terror of the German Blitzkrieg. In the early years of the Second World War the Ju 87 lived up to its fearsome reputation, but it eventually met its match when pitted against more modern adversaries. Supported by a comprehensive selection of photographs and technical drawings, Jonathan Falconer's Junkers JU 87 Stuka Manual describes the design, construction and operation of the feared Stuka, which saw frontline action wherever the German Army went – from Norway, western Europe and Russia, to North Africa.

Avro Lancaster - Handley Page Halifax - Short S.29 Stirling

Author: Mantelli - Brown - Kittel - Graf

Publisher: Edizioni R.E.I.

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 120

View: 854

The Avro Lancaster was a four-engine heavy bomber used by the RAF in 1942 and, together with the Handley Page Halifax, was the main strategic bomber of the RAF and other air forces of the Commonwealth countries. It was mainly used as a night bomber. Around 7,378 were realized Lancaster (excluding prototypes), 430 of them in Canada and they were lost in action 3,932. The Handley Page Halifax was a major British four-engined heavy bombers, remaining in service until the end of the conflict, with numerous tasks in addition to bombing. Halifax's career began in November 1940 and continued until the end of the war. These four engine, however, continued to operate, albeit in minor roles, until 1954-56. In practice, however, the Lancaster showed better performance and as soon as it was available in sufficient numbers, he replaced the Halifax. The Short S.29 Stirling was a British heavy bomber, the first in its class. Along with Lancaster and the Halifax constitute the three main bombers used by Britain in World War II with capacity of bombs from 6,000 kg to 10,000 kg Bomb Grand Slam, one of the heaviest bombs ever built.

The Lancaster Bomber Pocket Manual

1941-1945

Author: Martin Robson

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 978

The Avro Lancaster was the RAF's most famous and successful heavy bomber of the Second World War. Used predominantly at night, 'Lancs' dropped 608,612 tons of bombs in 156,000 sorties in the period 1942-1945. Some of these missions were incredibly daring – notably the 'dambusters' raid of 617 squadron on the Ruhr valley dams in May 1943. The success of such operations was testament both to the rugged, reliable qualities of this amazing aircraft and the bravery and skill of the pilots, navigators, bombardiers, flight engineers and gunners that crewed it. They relied on their training and experience, supplemented by various pamphlets and manuals that were produced throughout the war. Supplemented with illustrative plans and diagrams, this fascinating pocket manual provides a unique insight into the wartime operation of this famous aircraft.

De Havilland Mosquito

1940 onwards (all marks) - An insight into developing, flying, servicing and restoring Britain's legendary 'Wooden Wonder' fighter-bomber (Owners' Workshop Manual)

Author: Jonathan Falconer

Publisher: Haynes Publishing UK

ISBN:

Category: Transportation

Page: 160

View: 406

Nicknamed the ‘wooden wonder’ , the de Havilland Mosquito was one of the most versatile and successful combat aircraft of the Second World War. Offering insights into the design, construction and operational career of the iconic Mossie, this manual gets under the aircraft’s birch and balsa skin to examine its anatomy and describe the painstaking restoration to flight by Avspecs (New Zealand) of Jerry Yagen’s FB26 KA114 and of Victoria Air Maintenance’s B35 VR796 in British Columbia, Canada.

D-Day 'Neptune', 'Overlord' and the Battle of Normandy

Insights into how science, technology and engineering made the Normandy invasion possible

Author: Jonathan Falconer

Publisher: Haynes Publishing UK

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 184

View: 759

The landing of Allied forces on the shores of Normandy on 6 June 1944 was the greatest amphibious invasion in history. Technology and innovation played crucial parts in the D-Day drama – from tank-carrying gliders, swimming tanks and the Mulberry harbors, to radio and radar aids that ensured landing craft arrived on the right beaches and combat aircraft overhead were controlled. This manual describes the development, construction and use of a wide range of innovative machines, structures and systems, explaining their uses on D-Day and after, and revealing how they contributed to the success of ‘Overlord’.