Cheap Novelties

The Pleasures of Urban Decay

Author: Ben Katchor

Publisher: Drawn and Quarterly

ISBN:

Category: Comics & Graphic Novels

Page: 112

View: 865

"Twenty-five years on, [Cheap Novelties'] observations of what is lost as cityscapes evolve and shift due to gentrification and changing demographics are still fresh and relevant."—The Guardian Cheap Novelties is an early testament to Ben Katchor's extraordinary prescience as both a gifted cartoonist and an astute urban chronicler. Rumpled, middle-aged Julius Knipl photographs a vanishing city--an urban landscape of low-rent apartment buildings, obsolete industries, monuments to forgotten people and events, and countless sources of inexpensive food. In Katchor's signature pen and ink wash style, Cheap Novelties is a portrait of what we have lost to gentrification, globalization, and the malling of America that is as moving today as it was twenty-five years ago. In 1991, the original Cheap Novelties appeared in an unassuming paperback from the RAW contributor; it would become one of the first books of the contemporary graphic novel golden age, and it set the stage for Katchor to become regarded as a modern-day cartooning genius. Drawn & Quarterly's twenty-fifth anniversary edition is a deluxe hardcover.

The Best American Comics 2017

Author: Ben Katchor

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN:

Category: Comic books, strips, etc

Page: 377

View: 962

Award-winning cartoonist Ben Katchor picks the best graphic pieces of the year.

Advertising to the American Woman, 1900-1999

Author: Daniel Delis Hill

Publisher: Ohio State University Press

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 329

View: 240

The author focuses on the marketing perspective of the topic and illustrates how women's roles in society have shifted during the past century. Among the key issues explored is a peculiar dichotomy of American advertising that served as a conservative reflection of society and, at the same time, became an underlying force of progressive social change. The study shows how advertisers of housekeeping products perpetuated the Happy Homemaker stereytype while tobacco and cosmetics marketers dismantled women's stereotypes to create an entirely new type of consumer.

Fear and Loathing in America

The Brutal Odyssey of an Outlaw Journalist

Author: Hunter S. Thompson

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 784

View: 428

From the king of “Gonzo” journalism and bestselling author who brought you Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas comes another astonishing volume of letters by Hunter S. Thompson. Brazen, incisive, and outrageous as ever, this second volume of Thompson’s private correspondence is the highly anticipated follow-up to The Proud Highway. When that first book of letters appeared in 1997, Time pronounced it "deliriously entertaining"; Rolling Stone called it "brilliant beyond description"; and The New York Times celebrated its "wicked humor and bracing political conviction." Spanning the years between 1968 and 1976, these never-before-published letters show Thompson building his legend: running for sheriff in Aspen, Colorado; creating the seminal road book Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas; twisting political reporting to new heights for Rolling Stone; and making sense of it all in the landmark Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail '72. To read Thompson's dispatches from these years—addressed to the author's friends, enemies, editors, and creditors, and such notables as Jimmy Carter, Tom Wolfe, and Kurt Vonnegut—is to read a raw, revolutionary eyewitness account of one of the most exciting and pivotal eras in American history.

The Rittenhouse Mill and the Beginnings of Papermaking in America

Author: James Green

Publisher: The Library Company of Phil

ISBN:

Category: Paper industry

Page: 32

View: 867

In 1691 the Rittenhouse family opened a paper mill outside of Philadelphia and for the next forty years were the only paper manufacturers in America. Wilhelm Rittinghausen, later known as William Rittenhouse, was born in Mulheim, Germany and learned the paper making trade. He moved to Amsterdam at a young age and then emigrated to America with his three children in 1687. William's descendants continued to be active in the paper making business into the nineteenth century when the productivity of the mill gaveway to the new technology.

America in Black and White

One Nation, Indivisible

Author: Stephan Thernstrom

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 704

View: 366

In a book destined to become a classic, Stephan and Abigail Thernstrom present important new information about the positive changes that have been achieved and the measurable improvement in the lives of the majority of African-Americans. Supporting their conclusions with statistics on education, earnings, and housing, they argue that the perception of serious racial divisions in this country is outdated -- and dangerous.

Daily Life in Civil War America

Author: Dorothy Denneen Volo

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 321

View: 712

The United States Civil War touched the lives of every American North and South at that time. This informative book makes extensive use of journals, newspapers, and diaries to bring together the experience of the soldier, civilian, and slave in one volume. What the soldiers ate, how they lived, and what they did for entertainment are discussed in detail. The experiences of Billy Yank and Johnny Reb are contrasted with activities on the homefront to bring this turbulent era alive for students, teachers, and Civil War buffs.

Reagan, In His Own Hand

The Writings of Ronald Reagan that Reveal His Revolutionary Vision for America

Author: Kiron K. Skinner

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 576

View: 264

Until Alzheimer's disease wreaked its gradual destruction, Ronald Reagan was an inveterate writer. He wrote not only letters, short fiction, poetry, and sports stories, but speeches, newspaper articles, and radio commentary on public policy issues, both foreign and domestic. Most of Reagan's original writings are pre-presidential. From 1975 to 1979 he gave more than 1,000 daily radio broadcasts, two-thirds of which he wrote himself. They cover every topic imaginable: from labor policy to the nature of communism, from World War II to the second Strategic Arms Limitation Treaty, from the future of Africa and East Asia to that of the United States and the world. They range from highly specific arguments to grand philosophy to personal stories. Even those who knew him best were largely unaware of Reagan's output. George Shultz, as he explains in the Foreword, was surprised when he first saw the manuscripts, but on reflection he really was not surprised at all. Here is definitive proof that Ronald Reagan was far more than a Great Communicator of other people's ideas. He was very much the author of his own ideas, with a single vision that he pursued relentlessly at home and abroad. Reagan, In His Own Hand presents this vision through Reagan's radio writings as well as other writings selected from throughout his life: short stories written in high school and college, a poem from his high school yearbook, newspaper articles, letters, and speeches both before and during the presidency. It offers many surprises, beginning with the fact that Reagan's writings exist in such size and breadth at all. While he was writing batches and batches of radio addresses, Reagan was also traveling the country, collaborating on a newspaper column, giving hundreds of speeches, and planning his 1980 campaign. Yet the wide reading and deep research self-evident here suggest a mind constantly at work. The selections are reproduced with Reagan's own edits, offering a unique window into his thought processes. These writings show that Reagan had carefully considered nearly every issue he would face as president. When he fired the striking air-traffic controllers, many thought that he was simply seizing an unexpected opportunity to strike a blow at organized labor. In fact, as he wrote in the '70s, he was opposed to public-sector unions using strikes. There has been much debate as to whether he deserves credit for the end of the cold war; here, in a 1980 campaign speech draft, he lays out a detailed vision of the grand strategy that he would pursue in order to encourage the Soviet system to collapse of its own weight, completely consistent with the policies of his presidency. Furthermore, in 1984, Reagan drafted comments he would make to Soviet foreign minister Andrei Gromyko at a critical meeting that would eventually lead to history's greatest reductions in armaments. Ronald Reagan's writings will change his reputation even among some of his closest allies and friends. Here, in his own hand, Reagan the thinker is finally fully revealed.