Grimoires

A History of Magic Books

Author: Owen Davies

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN:

Category: Body, Mind & Spirit

Page: 368

View: 296

The first ever history of magic books - or grimoires - from the ancient Middle East through to the modern day, from harmless charms and remedies to sinister pacts with the Devil.

The Oxford Illustrated History of Witchcraft and Magic

Author: Owen Davies

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 300

This richly illustrated history provides a readable and fresh approach to the extensive and complex story of witchcraft and magic. Telling the story from the dawn of writing in the ancient world to the globally successful Harry Potter films, the authors explore a wide range of magical beliefs and practices, the rise of the witch trials, and the depiction of the Devil-worshipping witch. The book also focuses on the more recent history of witchcraft and magic, from the Enlightenment to the present, exploring the rise of modern magic, the anthropology of magic around the globe, and finally the cinematic portrayal of witches and magicians, from The Wizard of Oz to Charmed and Buffy the Vampire Slayer.

Magic: A Very Short Introduction

Author: Owen Davies

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 135

View: 770

A wide-ranging overview of how magic has been defined, understood and practiced over the millennia introduces it in today's world as a real force that helps people overcome misfortune, poverty and illness. By the author of Grimoires: A History of Magic Books. Original.

America Bewitched

The Story of Witchcraft After Salem

Author: Owen Davies

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 356

America Bewitched is the first major history of witchcraft in America - from the Salem witch trials of 1692 to the present day. The infamous Salem trials are etched into the consciousness of modern America, the human toll a reminder of the dangers of intolerance and persecution. The refrain 'Remember Salem!' was invoked frequently over the ensuing centuries. As time passed, the trials became a milepost measuring the distance America had progressed from its colonial past, its victims now the righteous and their persecutors the shamed. Yet the story of witchcraft did not end as the American Enlightenment dawned - a new, long, and chilling chapter was about to begin. Witchcraft after Salem was not just a story of fire-side tales, legends, and superstitions: it continued to be a matter of life and death, souring the American dream for many. We know of more people killed as witches between 1692 and the 1950s than were executed before it. Witches were part of the story of the decimation of the Native Americans, the experience of slavery and emancipation, and the immigrant experience; they were embedded in the religious and social history of the country. Yet the history of American witchcraft between the eighteenth and the twentieth century also tells a less traumatic story, one that shows how different cultures interacted and shaped each other's languages and beliefs. This is therefore much more than the tale of one persecuted community: it opens a fascinating window on the fears, prejudices, hopes, and dreams of the American people as their country rose from colony to superpower.

Wicca Book of Shadows

Grimoires: The History of Magic Books and A Beginner's Guide with A Step-by-Step Process for Making Spells

Author: Mary Patterson

Publisher: Independently Published

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 220

View: 851

Buy the Paperback Version of the Book and get the Kindle Book Version for FREE! If you are new to Wicca and looking to start your book of shadows and are unsure of where to start, then don't look any further. The thing is, you've probably heard about people having a book of shadows or a grimoire, but you have no clue what they are talking about. Maybe you do know what it is, and you've tried to start your own, but it didn't go so well. Scouring the internet looking for spells or book of shadows examples can be nauseating. There are millions of spells, some asking for things you've never heard of. They talk about casting circles, different herbs, crystals, and knives. You don't know where you are supposed to start, and you get frustrated and given up before you are able to even cast your first spell. Nobody likes to get disgusted with something that you have just started to learn about. Finding clear information is all you want, but there is so much information that you have no clue what to do. Does this sound familiar? If it does, then the information inside this book is your answer. This isn't some website that you have to suss through to figure out what exactly it is you want. This book will become your book of shadows. It will give you a place to start and then add to once you feel comfortable to do so. You will find a bunch of spells, rituals, and information that will take the scariness of your practice and put the power back into your hands. In the book of shadows, you will find: Protection spells for all occasions. The answers to your questions about grimoires. The best way to create your own book of shadows. How to create potions for different problems. How to cast circles for different occasions You may be asking, "Can this book really help me understand the book of shadows and create my own? Even if you have never been able to start your own book of shadows for whatever reasons, you can learn how to create your own by the time you finish this book. If you are looking to really start your Wiccan practice and you want to start your book of shadows today, then simply click the buy now button on this page to get started.

A History of Conversion to Islam in the United States, Volume 2

The African American Islamic Renaissance, 1920-1975

Author: Patrick D. Bowen

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 732

View: 999

In A History of Conversion to Islam in the United States, Volume 2: The African American Islamic Renaissance, 1920-1975 Patrick D. Bowen offers an account of the diverse roots and manifestations of African American Islam as it appeared between 1920 and 1975.

A Supernatural War

Magic, Divination, and Faith During the First World War

Author: Owen Davies

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 304

View: 430

It was a commonly expressed view during the First World War that the conflict had seen a major revival of "superstitious" beliefs and practices. Churches expressed concerns about the wearing of talismans and amulets, the international press paid considerable interest to the pronouncements of astrologers and prophets, and the authorities in several countries periodically clamped down on fortune tellers and mediums due to concerns over their effect on public morale. Out on the battlefields, soldiers of all nations sought to protect themselves through magical and religious rituals, and, on the home front, people sought out psychics and occult practitioners for news of the fate of their distant loved ones or communication with their spirits. Even away from concerns about the war, suspected witches continued to be abused and people continued to resort to magic and magical practitioners for personal protection, love, and success. Uncovering and examining beliefs, practices, and contemporary opinions regarding the role of the supernatural in the war years, Owen Davies explores the broader issues regarding early twentieth-century society in the West, the psychology of the supernatural during wartime, and the extent to which the war cast a spotlight on the widespread continuation of popular belief in magic. A Supernatural War reveals the surprising stories of extraordinary people in a world caught up with the promise of occult powers.

Encyclopedia of Demons in World Religions and Cultures

Author: Theresa Bane

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 416

View: 107

This exhaustive volume catalogs nearly three thousand demons in the mythologies and lore of virtually every ancient society and most religions. From Aamon, the demon of life and reproduction with the head of a serpent and the body of a wolf in Christian demonology, to Zu, the half-man, half-bird personification of the southern wind and thunder clouds in Sumero-Akkadian mythology, entries offer descriptions of each demon’s origins, appearance and cultural significance. Also included are descriptions of the demonic and diabolical members making up the hierarchy of Hell and the numerous species of demons that, according to various folklores, mythologies, and religions, populate the earth and plague mankind. Very thoroughly indexed.

Popular Magic: Cunning-folk in English History

Author: Owen Davies

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 264

View: 584

Cunning-folk were local practitioners of magic, providing small-scale but valued service to the community. They were far more representative of magical practice than the arcane delvings of astrologers and necromancers. Mostly unsensational in their approach, cunning-folk helped people with everyday problems: how to find lost objects; how to escape from bad luck or a suspected spell; and how to attract a lover or keep the love of a husband or wife. While cunning-folk sometimes fell foul of the authorities, both church and state often turned a blind eye to their existence and practices, distinguishing what they did from the rare and sensational cases of malvolent witchcraft. In a world of uncertainty, before insurance and modern science, cunning-folk played an important role that has previously been ignored.

Religion and Doctor Who

Time and Relative Dimensions in Faith

Author: Andrew Crome

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 366

View: 981

Doctor Who has always contained a rich current of religious themes and ideas. In its very first episode it asked how humans rationalize the seemingly supernatural, as two snooping schoolteachers refused to accept that the TARDIS was real. More recently it has toyed with the mystery of Doctor's real name, perhaps an echo of ancient religions and rituals in which knowledge of the secret name of a god, angel or demon was thought to grant a mortal power over the entity. But why does Doctor Who intersect with religion so often, and what do such instances tell us about the society that produces the show and the viewers who engage with it? The writers of Religion and Doctor Who: Time and Relative Dimensions in Faith attempt to answer these questions through an in-depth analysis of the various treatments of religion throughout every era of the show's history. While the majority of chapters focus on the television show Doctor Who, the authors also look at audios, novels, and the response of fandom. Their analyses--all written in an accessible but academically thorough style--reveal that examining religion in a long-running series such as Doctor Who can contribute to a number of key debates within faith communities and religious history. Most importantly, it provides another way of looking at why Doctor Who continues to inspire, to engage, and to excite generations of passionate fans, whatever their position on faith. The contributors are drawn from the UK, the USA, and Australia, and their approaches are similarly diverse. Chapters have been written by film scholars and sociologists; theologians and historians; rhetoricians, philosophers and anthropologists. Some write from the perspective of a particular faith or belief; others write from the perspective of no religious belief. All, however, demonstrate a solid knowledge of and affection for the brilliance of Doctor Who.