Greek Science of the Hellenistic Era

A Sourcebook

Author: Georgia L. Irby-Massie

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 535

We all want to understand the world around us, and the ancient Greeks were the first to try and do so in a way we can properly call scientific. Their thought and writings laid the essential foundations for the revivals of science in medieval Baghdad and renaissance Europe. Now their work is accessible to all, with this invaluable introduction to c.100 scientific authors active from 320 BCE to 230 CE. The book begins with an outline of a new socio-political model for the development and decline of Greek science, followed by eleven chapters that cover the main disciplines: * the science which the Greeks saw as fundamental - mathematics * astronomy * astrology and geography * mechanics * optics and pneumatics * the non-mathematical sciences of alchemy, biology, medicine and 'psychology'. Each chapter contains an accessible introduction on the origins and development of the topic in question, and all the authors are set in context with brief biographies.

Greek Science

Author: T. E. Rihll

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 163

View: 454

Greek Science surveys the range and scope of ancient work on topics now called science.

A Companion to Science, Technology, and Medicine in Ancient Greece and Rome

Author: Georgia L. Irby

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 1112

View: 879

A Companion to Science, Technology, and Medicine in Ancient Greece and Rome brings a fresh perspective to the study of these disciplines in the ancient world, with 60 chapters examining these topics from a variety of critical and technical perspectives. Brings a fresh perspective to the study of science, technology, and medicine in the ancient world, with 60 chapters examining these topics from a variety of critical and technical perspectives Begins coverage in 600 BCE and includes sections on the later Roman Empire and beyond, featuring discussion of the transmission and reception of these ideas into the Renaissance Investigates key disciplines, concepts, and movements in ancient science, technology, and medicine within the historical, cultural, and philosophical contexts of Greek and Roman society Organizes its content in two halves: the first focuses on mathematical and natural sciences; the second focuses on cultural applications and interdisciplinary themes 2 Volumes

Ancient technical texts

Author: Thorsten Fögen

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 378

View: 694

The contributors to this volume analyse how ancient technical writers dealt with linguistic and stylistic, in particular terminological, features, but also focus on the pragmatic level of technical texts, e.g., their structure and form, their intentions and readers, as well as the role of polemics and the relationship between text and illustrations.

Hellenistic Science and Culture in the Last Three Centuries B.C.

Author: George Sarton

Publisher: Courier Corporation

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 554

View: 884

Noted scholar's brilliant recapitulation of an especially fertile period for Greek astronomy, physics, mathematics, other sciences. Also illuminating discussions of art, religion, literature, more. "A wonderful book." ? Scientific American.

Performance in Greek and Roman Theatre

Author: George Harrison

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 602

View: 583

Drawing on insights from various disciplines (philology, archaeology, art) as well as from performance and reception studies, this volume shows how a heightened awareness of performance can enhance our appreciation of Greek and Roman theatre.

The Hellenistic Age

Author: Peter Green

Publisher: Modern Library

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 193

The Hellenistic era witnessed the overlap of antiquity’s two great Western civilizations, the Greek and the Roman. This was the epoch of Alexander’s vast expansion of the Greco-Macedonian world, the rise and fall of his successors’ major dynasties in Egypt and Asia, and, ultimately, the establishment of Rome as the first Mediterranean superpower. The Hellenistic Age chronicles the years 336 to 30 BCE, from the days of Philip and Alexander of Macedon to the death of Cleopatra and the final triumph of Caesar’s heir, the young Augustus. Peter Green’s remarkably far-ranging study covers the prevalent themes and events of those centuries: the Hellenization of an immense swath of the known world–from Egypt to India–by Alexander’s conquests; the lengthy and chaotic partition of this empire by rival Macedonian marshals after Alexander’s death; the decline of the polis (city state) as the predominant political institution; and, finally, Rome’s moment of transition from republican to imperial rule. Predictably, this is a story of war and power-politics, and of the developing fortunes of art, science, and statecraft in the areas where Alexander’s coming disseminated Hellenic culture. It is a rich narrative tapestry of warlords, libertines, philosophers, courtesans and courtiers, dramatists, historians, scientists, merchants, mercenaries, and provocateurs of every stripe, spun by an accomplished classicist with an uncanny knack for infusing life into the distant past, and applying fresh insights that make ancient history seem alarmingly relevant to our own times. To consider the three centuries prior to the dawn of the common era in a single short volume demands a scholar with a great command of both subject and narrative line. The Hellenistic Age is that rare book that manages to coalesce a broad spectrum of events, persons, and themes into one brief, indispensable, and amazingly accessible survey. From the Hardcover edition.

The Oxford History of Greece and the Hellenistic World

Author: John Boardman

Publisher: Oxford Paperbacks

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 520

View: 929

The period from the emergence of the Greek city-state in the eighth century BC to the reign of Alexander the Great and the establishment of Greek monarchies was one unparalleled in history for its brilliance in literature, philosophy, and the visual arts. This book reproduces the text of the hugely successful Oxford History of the Classical World: Greece and the Hellenistic World in a standard paperback form. Written by a team of leading classical scholars, it includes chapters on political and social history, Homer, Greek myth, drama, science, and the great philosophers. All the original line drawings and maps have been retained, and an eight-page plate section has been specially selected for this edition by Sir John Boardman. - ;The period from the emergence of the Greek city-state in the eighth century BC to the reign of Alexander the Great and the establishment of Greek monarchies was one unparalleled in history for its brilliance in literature, philosophy, and the visual arts. This book reproduces the text of the hugely successful Oxford History of the Classical World: Greece and the Hellenistic World in a standard paperback form. Written by a team of leading classical scholars, it includes chapters on political and social history, Homer, Greek myth, drama, science, and the great philosophers. All the original line drawings and maps have been retained, and an eight-page plate section has been specially selected for this edition by Sir John Boardman. -

The Forgotten Revolution

How Science Was Born in 300 BC and Why it Had to Be Reborn

Author: Lucio Russo

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 487

View: 954

The period from the late fourth to the late second century B. C. witnessed, in Greek-speaking countries, an explosion of objective knowledge about the external world. WhileGreek culture had reached great heights in art, literature and philosophyalreadyin the earlier classical era, it is in the so-called Hellenistic period that we see for the ?rst time — anywhere in the world — the appearance of science as we understand it now: not an accumulation of facts or philosophically based speculations, but an or- nized effort to model nature and apply such models, or scienti?ctheories in a sense we will make precise, to the solution of practical problems and to a growing understanding of nature. We owe this new approach to scientists such as Archimedes, Euclid, Eratosthenes and many others less familiar todaybut no less remarkable. Yet, not long after this golden period, much of this extraordinary dev- opment had been reversed. Rome borrowed what it was capable of from the Greeks and kept it for a little while yet, but created very little science of its own. Europe was soon smothered in theobscurantism and stasis that blocked most avenues of intellectual development for a thousand years — until, as is well known, the rediscovery of ancient culture in its fullness paved the way to the modern age.

The Image of the Jews in Greek Literature

The Hellenistic Period

Author: Bezalel Bar-Kochva

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 632

View: 787

This landmark contribution to ongoing debates about perceptions of the Jews in antiquity examines the attitudes of Greek writers of the Hellenistic period toward the Jewish people. Among the leading Greek intellectuals who devoted special attention to the Jews were Theophrastus (the successor of Aristotle), Hecataeus of Abdera (the father of "scientific" ethnography), and Apollonius Molon (probably the greatest rhetorician of the Hellenistic world). Bezalel Bar-Kochva examines the references of these writers and others to the Jews in light of their literary output and personal background; their religious, social, and political views; their literary and stylistic methods; ethnographic stereotypes current at the time; and more.