Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics

An Exegetical Syntax of the New Testament

Author: Daniel B. Wallace

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN:

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 827

View: 261

Depth, accuracy, relevancy and up-to-date presentation make this intermediate Greek grammar the finest available. Written by a world-class authority on textual criticism, it links grammar and exegesis to provide today's second-year Greek student with solid exegetical and linguistic foundations.

Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics Video Lectures

An Exegetical Syntax of the New Testament

Author: Daniel B. Wallace

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 223

Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics Video Lectures---a companion to the textbooks, Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics and The Basics of New Testament Syntax, by Daniel B. Wallace---provides 30 lectures, each corresponding to a section in the textbooks. The lectures introduce second-year Greek students to syntax and exegesis of the Greek New Testament.

A Workbook for New Testament Syntax

Companion to Basics of New Testament Syntax and Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics

Author: Daniel B. Wallace

Publisher: Zondervan

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 192

View: 941

Daniel B. Wallace’s groundbreaking books Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics: An Exegetical Syntax of the New Testament and Basics of New Testament Syntax have become the standard textbooks among colleges and seminaries for teaching New Testament Greek syntax. This workbook, designed to accompany both books, presents a dynamic approach to learning Greek syntax. Instead of simply learning syntax in single-verse snippets, students are exposed to all of the major syntactical categories in exegetically and theologically significant passages.

The Basics of New Testament Syntax

An Intermediate Greek Grammar

Author: Daniel B. Wallace

Publisher: Zondervan

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 336

View: 693

The Basics of New Testament Syntax provides concise, up-to-date guidance for intermediate Greek students to do accurate exegesis of biblical texts. Abridged from Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics: An Exegetical Syntax of the New Testament, the popular exegetical Greek grammar for studies in Greek by Daniel B. Wallace, The Basics of New Testament Syntax offers a practical grammar for second-year students.The strengths of this abridgment will become quickly apparent to the user:• It shows the relevance of syntax for exegesis and is thoroughly cross-referenced to Exegetical Syntax.• It includes an exceptional number of categories useful for intermediate Greek studies.• It is easy to use. Each semantic category is discussed, and a definition and key to identification are provided.• Scores of charts and tables are included to enable the intermediate student to grasp the material quickly.

New Testament Greek Syntax Laminated Sheet

Author: Daniel B. Wallace

Publisher: Zondervan

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 6

View: 810

This summary laminated sheet of Greek Grammar beyond the Basics and Basics of New Testament Syntax is perfect for students to review categories of uses and look over possibilities when doing exegesis of the New Testament.

Biblical Greek Exegesis

A Graded Approach to Learning Intermediate and Advanced Greek

Author: George H. Guthrie

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN:

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 173

View: 785

Biblical Greek Exegesis presents a proven, highly practical approach to the study of intermediate and advanced Greek grammar. Most textbooks focus on learning syntactical categories, illustrated by sentences taken from the Greek New Testament, and place little emphasis on how to apply Greek grammar to the Greek text in preparing sermons and lectures. In contrast, Biblical Greek Exegesis stresses "real-life" application. Beginning with selections from the Greek New Testament, students learn intermediate and advanced Greek grammar inductively by analyzing the text. The process closely resembles the approach used in sermon and lecture preparation. In Part 1 (SYNTAX), students work through nine selections from the New Testament, taken from the Gospels, Paul's letters (including Romans), and the General Letters. The selections are arranged in order of increasing difficulty. The student becomes familiar with syntactical categories through translation, grammatical analysis, and grammatical diagramming, supplemented by class discussion. Equally important, the length of these selections allows for semantic diagramming and analysis. This provides a tool for analyzing larger units of meaning, which is not possible when working only with sentences that illustrate specific points of grammar. In Part 2 (EXEGESIS), the student takes the sections from the Greek New Testament through a twelve-step method of exegesis and exposition. The student works through one section of approximately fifteen verses every two weeks, beginning with the first step--spiritual preparation--and ending with application and a preaching/teaching outline. This approach has two benefits. Advanced Greek students learn to use the Greek text and grammar as they will in the "real world." They also learn to integrate other significant areas such as literary form and textual criticism, as well as the use of exegetical tools. In short, they become better expositors of the Word of God. Bibliographies are provided for each of the twelve steps in the exegetical process. Also included is a summary of syntactical categories based on Wallace's Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics. This successfully field-tested approach to intermediate and advanced Greek will help students bridge the gap between understanding the categories of Greek grammar and the demand to communicate the meaning and significance of the New Testament message to the twenty-first century.

Granville Sharp's Canon and Its Kin

Semantics and Significance

Author: Daniel B. Wallace

Publisher: Peter Lang

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 347

View: 492

"Granville Sharp's Canon and Its Kin" explains that the semantics of the article-substantive-KAI-substantive construction (TSKS) have been largely misunderstood and that this misunderstanding has adversely impacted the exegesis of several theologically significant texts. This issue is addressed from three angles: historical investigation, linguistic-phenomenological analysis of the construction, and exegetical implications. The reasons for the misunderstanding are traced historically; a better comprehension of the semantics of the construction is established by an examination of primary literature in the light of linguistic theory; and the implications of this analysis are applied to a number of passages in the New Testament. Historically, the treatment begins with a clear grammatical principle articulated by Granville Sharp, and it ends with the present-day confusion. This book includes a detailed examination of the New Testament data and other Ancient Greek literature, which reveals that Sharp's rule has a general validity in the language. Lastly, a number of exegetically significant texts that are affected by the linguistic-phenomenological investigation are discussed in detail. This enlightening text is a valuable resource for undergraduate and graduate students of religion, linguistics, history, and Greek.

A Graded Reader of Biblical Greek

Author: William D. Mounce

Publisher: Zondervan

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 206

View: 819

This companion to Basics of Biblical Greek and Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics contains annotated readings from the New Testament designed for second-year students of the Greek language.

The Language of the New Testament

Context, History, and Development

Author: Stanley E. Porter

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 525

View: 810

In The Language of the New Testament, Stanley E. Porter and Andrew W. Pitts assemble an international team of scholars whose work has focused on the Greek language of the earliest Christians in terms of its context, history and development.

Elementary New Testament Greek

Author: Joseph Dongell

Publisher: First Fruits Press

ISBN:

Category: Bible

Page: 238

View: 871

The digital copies of this book is available for free at First Fruits website. place.asburyseminary.edu/firstfruits Under Revision: This grammar has already undergone numbers of revisions over the last 4 years, for which I must thank Mr. Brad Johnson (model language instructor) and his students for their fine-toothed combing of the text. This present publication, the first effort to combine the two semesters of elementary Greek instruction into one volume with full appendices, represents the first half of a full revision. Chapters 1-12 have been brought up the standards of the most recent suggestions. Chapters 13-24 await this latest wave of modification, with all chapters together scheduled to be in their fully revised form by February of 2015. My special thanks goes to Mr. Klay Harrison, whose expertise and enthusiasm for this labor is stamped on every page. Preface: The world does not another Elementary Greek Grammar There are many fine products on the market that have proven themselves to be useful both in the classroom and for private instruction. The need for this particular grammar arises from the peculiar shape of the MDiv curriculum at Asbury Theological Seminary. Several years ago the faculty adopted a curriculum that required one semester of Greek and one semester of Hebrew, each as preparatory for a basic exegesis course in each discipline. It became clear after several years of trial and error that a "lexical" or "tools" approach to learning Greek and Hebrew was inadequate, no matter how skilled the instructors or how motivated the students. In today's general vacuum of grammatical training in public education across the United States, students typically enter seminary training with no knowledge of how languages work. Any training we might give them in accessing grammatical information through the use of Bible software programs will, we learned, come to naught in the absence of an understanding of just what such information actually means. We agreed that we actually needed to "teach the language itself," at least in some rudimentary fashion, if we hoped students would make sense of grammatical and linguistic issues involved biblical interpretation. The first 12 chapters of this grammar are designed to correspond to the first semester's instructional agenda. In these chapters we introduce all the parts of speech, explain and drill the basic elements of grammar, set forth the larger verb system (excluding the perfect system), teach the tenses of the Indicative Mood only (again, excluding the perfect system), and help students build a vocabulary of all NT words occurring 100 times or more. We also lead students into the NT itself with carefully chosen examples, while at the same time guiding them in each lesson to learn the use of the standard NT lexicon BDAG] and an exegetical grammar Wallace's Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics]. We are well aware of the limitations of this approach, but genuinely believe that some instruction along these lines is better than none, and that such an approach provide a foundation for students interested in moving beyond the first semester (into chapters 13-24) into a firmer grasp of the language of the NT