Greek and Roman Siege Machinery 399 BC–AD 363

Author: Duncan B Campbell

Publisher: Osprey Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 48

View: 147

Siege machinery first appeared in the West during the Carthaginian invasion of Sicily in the late-5th century BC, in the form of siege towers and battering rams. After a 50-year hiatus these weapons of war re-appeared in the Macedonian armies of Philip II and Alexander the Great, a period that saw the height of their development in the Ancient World. The experience of warfare with both the Carthaginians during the later-3rd century BC, and Philip V of Macedon during the early-2nd century BC, finally prompted the introduction of the siege tower and the battering ram to the Roman arsenal. This title traces the development and use of these weapons across the whole of this period.

The Armies of Classical Greece

Author: Everett L. Wheeler

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 592

View: 862

The origin of the Western military tradition in Greece 750-362 BC is fraught with controversies, such as the date and nature of the phalanx, the role of agricultural destruction and the existence of rules and ritualistic practices. This volume collects papers significant for specific points in debates or theoretical value in shaping and critiquing controversial viewpoints. An introduction offers a critical analysis of recent trends in ancient military history and provides a bibliographical essay contextualizing the papers within the framework of debates with a guide to further reading.

Conflict in Ancient Greece and Rome: The Definitive Political, Social, and Military Encyclopedia [3 volumes]

The Definitive Political, Social, and Military Encyclopedia

Author: Sara E. Phang

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 1421

View: 348

The complex role warfare played in ancient Greek and Roman civilizations is examined through coverage of key wars and battles; important leaders, armies, organizations, and weapons; and other noteworthy aspects of conflict. • Provides an up-to-date and comprehensive treatment of conflict in the ancient Greek and Roman worlds that relates warfare to society, politics, economy, and culture • Examines major wars and other key conflicts; important generals and leaders; and Greek and Roman political, military, social, and cultural institutions • Presents ancillary information, including maps and illustrations; a topically arranged bibliography; sourcebooks of primary sources in translation; and lists of the most interesting "sound bites" attributed to Greek and Roman leaders in ancient times

The Roman Army

Author: David J. Breeze

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 176

View: 768

This authoritative short volume introduces readers to the Roman army, its structure, tactics, duties and development. One of the most successful fighting forces that the world has seen, the Roman army was inherited by the emperor Augustus who re-organized it and established its legions in military bases, many of which survived to the end of the empire. He and subsequent emperors used it as a formidable tool for expansion. Soon, however, the army became fossilized on its frontiers and changed from a mobile fighting force to a primarily defensive body. Written by a leading authority on the Roman army and the frontiers it defended and expanded, this is an invaluable book for students at school and university level, as well as a handy guide for general readers with an interest in military history, the rise and development and fall of the Roman legions, and the ancient world.

On Architecture

Author: Vitruvius

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 496

View: 603

In De architectura (c.40 BC), Vitruvius discusses in ten encyclopedic chapters aspects of Roman architecture, engineering and city planning. Vitruvius also included a section on human proportions. Because it is the only antique treatise on architecture to have survived, De architectura has been an invaluable source of information for scholars. The rediscovery of Vitruvius during the Renaissance greatly fuelled the revival of classicism during that and subsequent periods. Numerous architectural treatises were based in part or inspired by Vitruvius, beginning with Leon Battista Alberti's De re aedificatoria (1485).

Artillery in the Era of the Crusades

Siege Warfare and the Development of Trebuchet Technology

Author: Michael S. Fulton

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 544

View: 875

In Artillery in the Era of the Crusades, Michael S. Fulton provides a detailed historical and archaeological study of the use and development of trebuchet technology in the Levant through the twelfth and thirteenth centuries.

The Measure of Civilization

How Social Development Decides the Fate of Nations

Author: Ian Morris

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 400

View: 954

In the last thirty years, there have been fierce debates over how civilizations develop and why the West became so powerful. The Measure of Civilization presents a brand-new way of investigating these questions and provides new tools for assessing the long-term growth of societies. Using a groundbreaking numerical index of social development that compares societies in different times and places, award-winning author Ian Morris sets forth a sweeping examination of Eastern and Western development across 15,000 years since the end of the last ice age. He offers surprising conclusions about when and why the West came to dominate the world and fresh perspectives for thinking about the twenty-first century. Adapting the United Nations' approach for measuring human development, Morris's index breaks social development into four traits--energy capture per capita, organization, information technology, and war-making capacity--and he uses archaeological, historical, and current government data to quantify patterns. Morris reveals that for 90 percent of the time since the last ice age, the world's most advanced region has been at the western end of Eurasia, but contrary to what many historians once believed, there were roughly 1,200 years--from about 550 to 1750 CE--when an East Asian region was more advanced. Only in the late eighteenth century CE, when northwest Europeans tapped into the energy trapped in fossil fuels, did the West leap ahead. Resolving some of the biggest debates in global history, The Measure of Civilization puts forth innovative tools for determining past, present, and future economic and social trends.

Apollodorus Mechanicus, Siege-matters

Author: Apollodorus (of Damascus)

Publisher: Franz Steiner Verlag Wiesbaden gmbh

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 162

View: 443

Apollodorus of Damascus is the best-known architect of the early second century AD, the era of Trajan and Hadrian. In the civil domain, he is credited with planning and constructing prestigious projects in Rome itself, including Trajan's Forum and Baths; in the military sphere he bridged the Danube and wrote a Siege-matters treatise for his patron-emperor. Addressed (it is argued here) to Trajan rather than Hadrian, and with a view to the campaigning conditions anticipated in Dacia, the treatise therefore proffered suggestions and designs suitable for a Roman army operating in that rugged terrain and attacking its hill-top settlements. However, as P. H. Blyth first realised, what has been transmitted under Apollodorus' name includes many later elaborations, armchair-fantasy inventions which, if ever built, could never have been effective. This, the work's first English translation and the first full commentary on it in any language, gives modern readers criteria for differentiating between these two disparate categories of material, thus allowing an assessment of each component in the terms appropriate to it.