Glass, Irony, and God

Author: Anne Carson

Publisher: New Directions Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Poetry

Page: 142

View: 683

Anne Carson's poetry - characterized by various reviewers as "short talks", "essays", or "verse narratives" - combines the confessional and the critical in a voice all her own. Known as a remarkable classicist, Anne Carson in Glass, Irony and God weaves contemporary and ancient poetic strands with stunning style. This collection includes: "The Glass Essay", a powerful poem about the end of a love affair, told in the context of Carson's reading of the Bronte sisters; "Book of Isaiah", a poem evoking the deeply primitive feel of ancient Judaism; and "The Fall of Rome", about her trip to "find" Rome and her struggle to overcome feelings of a terrible alienation there.

A Companion to Twentieth-Century Poetry

Author: Neil Roberts

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 648

View: 553

This broad-ranging "Companion" gives readers a thorough grounding in both the background and the substance of eighteenth-century poetry in all its rich variety. An up-to-date and wide-ranging guide to eighteenth-century poetry. Reflects the dramatic transformation which has taken place in the study of eighteenth-century poetry over the past two decades. Opens with a section on contexts, discussing poetry's relationships with patriotism, politics, science, and the visual arts, for example. Discusses poetry by male and female poets from all walks of life. Includes numerous close readings of individual poems, ranging from Pope's "The Rape of the Lock" to Mary Collier's "The Woman's Labour." Includes more provocative contributions on subjects such as rural poetry and the self-taught tradition, British poetry 'beyond the borders', the constructions of femininity, women as writers and women as readers. Designed to be used alongside David Fairer and Christine Gerrard's "Eighteenth-century Poetry: An Annotated Anthology" (Blackwell Publishing, Second Edition, 2003).

Bakkhai

Author: Anne Carson

Publisher: Oberon Books

ISBN:

Category: Drama

Page: 72

View: 369

Pentheus has banned the wild, ritualistic worship of the god Dionysos. A stranger arrives to persuade him to change his mind. Euripides’ electrifying tragedy is a struggle to the death between freedom and restraint, the rational and the irrational, man and god.

In Translation

Reflections, Refractions, Transformations

Author: Paul St-Pierre

Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 313

View: 893

With contributions by researchers from India, Europe, North America and the Caribbean, In Translation – Reflections, refractions, transformations touches on questions of method and on topics – including copyright, cultural hybridity, globalization, identity construction, and minority languages – which are important for the disciplinary development of translation studies but also of interest to other fields as well, most notably comparative literature, cultural studies and world literature. The volume provides a forum for new voices to be heard alongside those of well-established scholars and for current concerns to express themselves, often focusing on practices in areas of the world other than Europe or North America, which have until now tended to dominate the field. Acknowledging difference and celebrating it, the contributions conceive of translation as a process which reconstitutes and transforms, which brings renewal and growth, an interaction in a new context, a new reading, a new writing.

Anne Carson

Ecstatic Lyre

Author: Joshua M Wilkinson

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN:

Category: Poetry

Page: 228

View: 939

The first book of essays dedicated to the work of noted writer, Anne Carson

Are We Not Men?

Unstable Masculinity in the Hebrew Prophets

Author: Rhiannon Graybill

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 256

View: 398

Are We Not Men? offers an innovative approach to gender and embodiment in the Hebrew Bible, revealing the male body as a source of persistent difficulty for the Hebrew prophets. Drawing together key moments in prophetic embodiment, Graybill demonstrates that the prophetic body is a queer body, and its very instability makes possible new understandings of biblical masculinity. Prophecy disrupts the performance of masculinity and demands new ways of inhabiting the body and negotiating gender. Graybill explores prophetic masculinity through critical readings of a number of prophetic bodies, including Isaiah, Moses, Hosea, Jeremiah, and Ezekiel. In addition to close readings of the biblical texts, this account engages with modern intertexts drawn from philosophy, psychoanalysis, and horror films: Isaiah meets the poetry of Anne Carson; Hosea is seen through the lens of possession films and feminist film theory; Jeremiah intersects with psychoanalytic discourses of hysteria; and Ezekiel encounters Daniel Paul Schreber's Memoirs of My Nervous Illness. Graybill also offers a careful analysis of the body of Moses. Her methods highlight unexpected features of the biblical texts, and illuminate the peculiar intersections of masculinity, prophecy, and the body in and beyond the Hebrew Bible. This assembly of prophets, bodies, and readings makes clear that attending to prophecy and to prophetic masculinity is an important task for queer reading. Biblical prophecy engenders new forms of masculinity and embodiment; Are We Not Men?offers a valuable map of this still-uncharted terrain.

The Fame Lunches

On Wounded Icons, Money, Sex, the Brontës, and the Importance of Handbags

Author: Daphne Merkin

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

ISBN:

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 416

View: 196

A wide-ranging collection of essays by one of America's most perceptive critics of popular and literary culture From one of America's most insightful and independent-minded critics comes a remarkable new collection of essays, her first in more than fifteen years. Daphne Merkin brings her signature combination of wit, candor, and penetrating intelligence to a wide array of subjects that touch on every aspect of contemporary culture, from the high calling of the literary life to the poignant underside of celebrity to our collective fixation on fame. "Sometimes it seems to me that the private life no longer suffices for many of us," she writes, "that if we are not observed by others doing glamorous things, we might as well not exist." Merkin's elegant, widely admired profiles go beneath the glossy façades of neon-lit personalities to consider their vulnerabilities and demons, as well as their enduring hold on us. As her title essay explains, she writes in order "to save myself through saving wounded icons . . . Famous people . . . who required my intervention on their behalf because only I understood the desolation that drove them." Here one will encounter a gallery of complex, unforgettable women—Marilyn Monroe, Courtney Love, Diane Keaton, and Cate Blanchett, among others—as well as such intriguing male figures as Michael Jackson, Mike Tyson, Truman Capote, and Richard Burton. Merkin reflects with empathy and discernment on what makes them run—and what makes them stumble. Drawing upon her many years as a book critic, Merkin also offers reflections on writers as varied as Jean Rhys, W. G. Sebald, John Updike, and Alice Munro. She considers the vexed legacy of feminism after Betty Friedan, Bruno Bettelheim's tarnished reputation as a healer, and the reenvisioning of Freud by the elusive Adam Phillips. Most of all, though, Merkin is a writer who is not afraid to implicate herself as a participant in our consumerist and overstimulated culture. Whether ruminating upon the subtext of lip gloss, detailing the vicissitudes of a pre–Yom Kippur pedicure, or arguing against our obsession with household pets, Merkin helps makes sense of our collective impulses. From a brazenly honest and deeply empathic observer, The Fame Lunches shines a light on truths we often prefer to keep veiled—and in doing so opens up the conversation for all of us.

Eros the Bittersweet

Author: Anne Carson

Publisher: Dalkey Archive Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 189

View: 272

Epigrammatic, witty, ironic, and endlessly interesting, Eros is an utterly original book by an author whose acclaim has been steadily growing since the book was first published in 1986 by Johns Hopkins.

This is Not a President

Sense, Nonsense, and the American Political Imaginary

Author: Diane Rubenstein

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 299

View: 662

Read The Chronicle of Higher Ed Author Interview In This Is Not a President, Diane Rubenstein looks at the postmodern presidency — from Reagan and George H. W. Bush, through the current administration, and including Hillary. Focusing on those seemingly inexplicable gaps or blind spots in recent American presidential politics, Rubenstein interrogates symptomatic moments in political rhetoric, popular culture, and presidential behavior to elucidate profound and disturbing changes in the American presidency and the way it embodies a national imaginary. In a series of essays written in real time over the past four presidential administrations, Rubenstein traces the vernacular use of the American presidency (as currency, as grist for popular biography, as fictional TV material) to explore the ways in which the American presidency functions as a “transitional object” that allows the American citizen to meet or discover the president while going about her everyday life. The book argues that it is French theory — primarily Lacanian psychoanalysis and the radical semiotic theories of Jean Baudrillard — that best accounts for American political life today. Through episodes as diverse as Iran Contra, George H. W. Bush vomiting in Japan, the 1992 Republican convention, the failed nomination of Lani Guinier, and the Iraq War, This Is Not a President brilliantly situates our collective investment in American political culture.