Ghosts of Jim Crow

Ending Racism in Post-Racial America

Author: F. Michael Higginbotham

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 915

When America inaugurated its first African American president, in 2009, many wondered if the country had finally become a "post-racial" society. Was this the dawning of a new era, in which America, a nation nearly severed in half by slavery, and whose racial fault lines are arguably among its most enduring traits, would at last move beyond race with the election of Barack Hussein Obama? In Ghosts of Jim Crow, F. Michael Higginbotham convincingly argues that America remains far away from that imagined utopia. Indeed, the shadows of Jim Crow era laws and attitudes continue to perpetuate insidious, systemic prejudice and racism in the 21st century. Higginbotham’s extensive research demonstrates how laws and actions have been used to maintain a racial paradigm of hierarchy and separation—both historically, in the era of lynch mobs and segregation, and today—legally, economically, educationally and socially. Using history as a roadmap, Higginbotham arrives at a provocative solution for ridding the nation of Jim Crow’s ghost, suggesting that legal and political reform can successfully create a post-racial America, but only if it inspires whites and blacks to significantly alter behaviors and attitudes of race-based superiority and victimization. He argues that America will never achieve its full potential unless it truly enters a post-racial era, and believes that time is of the essence as competition increases globally.

Black Lives Matter

Author: Edwards, Sue Bradford

Publisher: ABDO

ISBN:

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 112

View: 942

Black Lives Matter covers the shootings that touched off passionate protests, the work of activists to bring about a more just legal system, and the tensions in US society that these events have brought to light. Aligned to Common Core Standards and correlated to state standards. Essential Library is an imprint of Abdo Publishing, a division of ABDO.

The Ground Has Shifted

The Future of the Black Church in Post-Racial America

Author: Walter Earl Fluker

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 304

View: 410

A powerful insight into the historical and cultural roles of the black church, the dilemmas it faces, and the roadmap for an ethical path forward. Honorable Mention, Theology and Religious Studies PROSE Award If we are in a post-racial era, then what is the future of the Black Church? If the U.S. will at some time in the future be free from discrimination and prejudices that are based on race how will that affect the church’s very identity? In The Ground Has Shifted, Walter Earl Fluker passionately and thoroughly discusses the historical and current role of the black church and argues that the older race-based language and metaphors of religious discourse have outlived their utility. He offers instead a larger, global vision for the black church that focuses on young black men and other disenfranchised groups who have been left behind in a world of globalized capital. Lyrically written with an emphasis on the dynamic and fluid movement of life itself, Fluker argues that the church must find new ways to use race as an emancipatory instrument if it is to remain central in black life, and he points the way for a new generation of church leaders, scholars and activists to reclaim the black church’s historical identity and to turn to the task of infusing character, civility, and a sense of community among its congregants.

Congressional Record

Proceedings and Debates of the ... Congress

Author: United States. Congress

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page:

View: 553

The Congressional Record is the official record of the proceedings and debates of the United States Congress. It is published daily when Congress is in session. The Congressional Record began publication in 1873. Debates for sessions prior to 1873 are recorded in The Debates and Proceedings in the Congress of the United States (1789-1824), the Register of Debates in Congress (1824-1837), and the Congressional Globe (1833-1873)

Contemporary Literary Criticism

Author: Jeffery Hunter

Publisher: Gale / Cengage Learning

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 368

View: 990

Covers authors who are currently active or who died after December 31, 1959. Profiles novelists, poets, playwrights and other creative and nonfiction writers by providing criticism taken from books, magazines, literary reviews, newspapers and scholarly journals.

Journal of the House of Representatives of the United States

Author: United States. Congress. House

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Legislation

Page:

View: 937

Some vols. include supplemental journals of "such proceedings of the sessions, as, during the time they were depending, were ordered to be kept secret, and respecting which the injunction of secrecy was afterwards taken off by the order of the House."

Race Law

Cases, Commentary, and Questions

Author: F. Michael Higginbotham

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 796

View: 284

Maintaining the easily readable style and tightly organized format of the first and second editions, the third edition of Race Law provides an in-depth examination of the issue of race in the American Legal process from the formation of the United States Constitution in 1787 to the present. In this book, Higginbotham combines a unique blend of moderately edited original source materials and scholarly analysis including historical background information, legislation, state and federal court decisions, commentary, biographical information, and questions. Fully revised and updated, the third edition offers important new material on race classification, reconstruction, reparations, citizenship, criminal justice, employment discrimination, affirmative action, and Supreme Court appointments. Higginbotham also explores the values of the individuals in power and probes how these values affected their choice of options. Race Law is divided into six parts: Analysis and Framework; Slavery; Reconstruction, Citizenship, and Sovereignty; Segregation; Attempted Eradication of Inequality; and Supreme Court Confirmation Controversies. While the material is presented primarily in chronological order, a few cases are strategically placed for pedagogical reasons consistent with the book's focus on values. This casebook is comprehensive in its coverage both as to time period (1787 to the present) and as to subject-matter (slavery, reconstruction, segregation, and attempted eradication as applied to African Americans, American Indians, Latinos/as, and Asian Americans). It includes all of the important cases and statutes pertaining to those subjects and groups. Although containing both cases and statutes, Race Law is an extremely readable casebook. Students love it because it reads like a novel rather than forty separate and distinct cases. This easily readable style is achieved by proceeding chronologically, by careful editing of each case, and by using introductions and conclusions for each case that allow for easy transitions between cases, and between cases and chapters. Race Law contains biographical information on individuals that played significant roles in the cases. Such information adds an element of reality to the theories being discussed. Race Law contains all of the fascinating stories that provide historical background to the cases and statutes. It is the only casebook that contains both cases and stories in one. Designed for those with limited exposure to the history of American race relations law, Race Law provides a unique introductory learning opportunity for law students, graduate students, and upper-division college students. The accompanying Teacher's Manual provides a detailed approach for each class session beginning with an introduction and an opening question, continuing with an in-depth examination of each assigned case, and concluding with a closing question and summary. An outline is provided for each class session, answers are provided for all suggested questions, and each case analysis includes facts, issue, holding, and rationale.

Partly Colored

Asian Americans and Racial Anomaly in the Segregated South

Author: Leslie Bow

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 285

View: 434

Talking at Trena's is an ethnography conducted in a bar in an African American, middle-class neighborhood on Chicago's southside. May's work focuses on how the mostly black, working- and middle-class patrons of Trena's talk about race, work, class, women, relationships, the media, and life in general. May recognizes tavern talk as a form of social play and symbolic performace within the tavern, as well as an indication of the social problems African Americans confront on a daily basis. Following a long tradition of research on informal gathering places, May's work reveals, though close description and analysis of ethnographic data, how African Americans come to understand the racial dynamics of American society which impact their jobs, entertainment--particularly television programs--and their social interactions with peers, employers, and others. Talking at Trena's provides a window into the laughs, complaints, experiences, and strategies which Trena's regulars share for managing daily life outside the safety and comfort of the tavern.

Freedom colonies

independent Black Texans in the time of Jim Crow

Author: Thad Sitton

Publisher: Univ of Texas Pr

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 248

View: 848

This study is a thoughtful and important addition to an understanding of rural Texas and the nature of black settlements. —Journal of Southern History "Thad Sitton and James H. Conrad have made an important contribution to African American and southern history with their study of communities fashioned by freedmen in the years after emancipation." —Journal of American History "This book is the first of its kind....Blacks emerge as thinkers and actors on the stage; that is, they were not merely passive victims; rather, they made their own history by building their own communities and by becoming free farmers." —James Smallwood, Professor Emeritus of History, Oklahoma State University In the decades following the Civil War, nearly a quarter of African Americans achieved a remarkable victory—they got their own land. While other ex-slaves and many poor whites became trapped in the exploitative sharecropping system, these independence-seeking individuals settled on pockets of unclaimed land that had been deemed too poor for farming and turned them into successful family farms. In these self-sufficient rural communities, often known as "freedom colonies," African Americans created a refuge from the discrimination and violence that routinely limited the opportunities of blacks in the Jim Crow South. Freedom Colonies is the first book to tell the story of these independent African American settlements. Thad Sitton and James Conrad focus on communities in Texas, where blacks achieved a higher percentage of land ownership than in any other state of the Deep South. The authors draw on a vast reservoir of ex-slave narratives, oral histories, written memoirs, and public records to describe how the freedom colonies formed and to recreate the lifeways of African Americans who made their living by farming or in skilled trades such as milling and blacksmithing. They also uncover the forces that led to the decline of the communities from the 1930s onward, including economic hard times and the greed of whites who found legal and illegal means of taking black-owned land. And they visit some of the remaining communities to discover how their independent way of life endures into the twenty-first century.

Sepia

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Comics & Graphic Novels

Page:

View: 443