The German Army in the Spring Offensives 1917

Arras, Aisne, & Champagne

Author: Jack Sheldon

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 400

View: 576

After the great battles of 1916, the Allied Armies planned to launch massive attacks North and South of the Somme. The German withdrawal to the Hindenburg Line in March 1917 forced the new French CinC General Nivelle to rethink and the French embarked on a major attack in the Aisne area and along the Chemin des Dames, with the British conducting large scale diversionary operations around Arras. The French suffered disastrously and, rendered incapable of further offensive operations, it fell to the British to step up the pressure, which they did albeit at a terrible price. This latest work by expert Jack Sheldon describes the event of Spring 1917 from the defenders' perspective. In particular it reveals the methods the Germans used to smash the French attacks and Oberst Fritz von Lossberg's transformation of the defences in the Arras front. Actions described in detail are the bitter battles around Monchy Le Preun, the Roeux Chemical works and Bullecourt as well as the capture of Vimy Ridge.

American Military History: The United States Army in a global era, 1917-2003

Author: Richard Winship Stewart

Publisher: Government Printing Office

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 542

View: 941

CMH Pub. 30-22. Army Historical Series. Richard W. Stewart, General Editor. Contains an historical survey of the organization and accomplishments of the United States Army from the eve of World War 1 to the war against terrorism still under way. Designed to inculcate in young officers and soldiers an awareness of our nation's military past and to demonstrate to them that the study of military history is an essential ingredient in leadership development. Intended primarily for use in the American Military History course in the Reserve Officers' Training Corps program in civilian colleges and universities.

The German Army on the Western Front 1917-1918

Rare Photographs From Wartime Archives

Author: David Bilton

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 270

View: 598

This highly illustrated book covers the German retreat from the Somme, through the defensive battles of 1917, the Kaiserschlacht (Kaiser's Battle) of early 1918, to the final Allied offensive from August to the end of the War. The post-Armistice events are also covered as the implications of defeat sunk in on an exhausted nation and its shattered army. Each phase is analysed from the German point of view giving an original angle. The photographs vividly demonstrate life and events both at the front line in the trenches as well as in the rear echelons. This book will appeal to a wide spectrum of readers. Its highly illustrated nature is ideal for the general reader while its rare photographs and unusual angle will make it collectable by the more specialist reader.

The Western Front 1917–1918: The History of World War I

From Vimy Ridge to Amiens and the Armistice

Author: Andrew Wiest

Publisher: Amber Books Ltd

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 351

After the first few months of World War I, the Western Front consisted of a relatively static line of trench systems which stretched from the coast of the North Sea southwards to the Swiss border. To try to break through the opposing lines of trenches and barbed wire entanglements, both sides employed huge artillery bombardments followed by attacks by tens of thousands of soldiers. Battles could last for months and led to casualties measured in hundreds of thousands for attacker and defender alike. After most of these attacks, only a short section of the front would have moved and only by a kilometer or two. After Gallipoli, Australians were moved to fight in France on the western Front, in battles including the Battle of the Somme. On the first day of the 1916 Battle of the Somme, 60,000 Allies were casualties, including 20,000 deaths. The principal adversaries on the Western Front, who fielded armies of millions of men, were Germany to the East against a western alliance to the West consisting of France and the United Kingdom with sizable contingents from the British Empire, especially the Dominions. The United States entered the war in 1917 and by the summer of 1918 had an army of around half a million men which rose to a million by the time the Armistice was signed on November 11, 1918. For most of World War I, Allied Forces, predominantly those of France and the British Empire, were stalled at trenches on the Western Front. With the aid of numerous black and white and color photographs, many previously unpublished, the World War I series recreates the battles and campaigns that raged across the surface of the globe, on land, at sea and in the air. The text is complemented by full-color maps that guide the reader through specific actions and campaigns.

How the War Was Won

Command and Technology in the British Army on the Western Front: 1917-1918

Author: T.H.E. Travers

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 268

View: 605

"How the War Was Won" describes the major role played by the British Expeditionary Force on the Western Front in defeating the German army. In particular, the book explains the methods used in fighting the last year of the war, and raises questions as to whether mechanical warfare could have been more widely used. Using a wide range of unpublished material from archives in both Britain and Canada, Travers explores the two themes of command and technology as the style of warfare changed from late 1917 through 1918. He describes in detail the British army's defense against the German 1918 spring offensives, analyzes command problems during these offensives, and offers an overriding explanation for the March 1918 retreat. He also fully investigates the role of the tank from Cambrai to the end of the war, and concludes that, properly used, the tank could have made a greater contribution to victory. "How the War Was Won" explodes many myths and advances newand controversial arguments. It will be essential reading for military historians and strategists, and for those interested in the origins of mechanical warfare.

Almanac of World War I

Author: David F. Burg

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 232

" Provides a day-by-day account of the action on all fronts and of the events surrounding the conflict, from the guns of August 1914 to the November 1918 Armistice and its troubled aftermath. Daily entries, topical descriptions, biographical sketches, maps, and illustrations combine to give a ready and succinct account of what was happening in each of the principal theaters of war.

The Army Medical Department, 1917-1941

Author: Mary C. Gillett

Publisher: Government Printing Office

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 644

View: 949

From the Book's Foreword: Long-awaited, Mary C Gillett's final work The Army Medical Department, 1917-1941, complete her four-volume study covering the years from 1775 to 1941. Although the Medical Department had improved medical standards and practices because of the latest advances in scientific medicine and was making significant progress toward creating an organizational structure and a supply system able to handle the demands of a conflict of any size, its reserves of trained personnel and supplies were seriously inadequate when the nation entered world War I in the spring of 1917. The narrative first describes the struggle of an unprepared department to meet the myriad demands of a war unprecedented size and complexity, then follows postwar efforts to meet the needs of the peacetime army during nearly two decades of continental isolationism and budgetary neglect, and finally covers the brief period of growing awareness of America's involvement in another major conflict and the intensive preparation efforts that ensued.

The Army Medical Department, 1917-1941 (Paperback)

Author: Mary C. Gillett

Publisher: Government Printing Office

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 664

View: 799

CMH 30-10-1. Army Historical Series. Provides a long-needed in-depth analysis of the Army Medical Department's struggle to maintain the health and fighting ability of the nation's soldiers during both World War 1, a conflict of unexpectedd proportions and violence, and the years that preceded World War 2.

Race to the Front

The Materiel Foundations of Coalition Strategy in the Great War

Author: Kevin D. Stubbs

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 373

View: 750

Traces the economic components of the trilateral struggle between the Entente, the Central Powers, and the United States to determine the outcome of the war.

The Germans in Flanders 1917-1918

Author: David Bilton

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 176

View: 531

The third volume covers the battles in Flanders against the Belgians, French and British over a twenty-three month period. Written using primary and secondary sources, it covers all the engagements. The major part of the book covers the FlandernSchlachtof July to November 1917; a battle viewed by the Germans as harder fought and more costly than the Somme, Arras and Verdun. Each phase and aspect of the period is detailed from the German point of view.The book is arranged in four sections: detailed and informative text; some 250 photos (that are interspersed into the text with captions); a chronological order of events in Flanders and a section on the German divisions that fought there. Where relevant material from the German home front is included and the illustrations, many of which have not been published before, also show how the towns and villages of the area have changed.

The dynamics of doctrine

the changes in German tactical doctrine during the First World War

Author: Timothy T. Lupfer

Publisher: DIANE Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Tactics

Page: 73

View: 278

Isonzo

The Forgotten Sacrifice of the Great War

Author: John R. Schindler

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 409

View: 459

The first complete account of the epic struggle between the Austrian and Italian armies along the Isonzo River during the First World War.

World War I

A Student Encyclopedia

Author: Spencer Tucker

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 2454

View: 497

Alphabetically arranged entries, supplemented with maps and primary documents, provide a complete history of the First World War.

Cemeteries of the Great War by Sir Edwin Lutyens

Author: Jeroen Geurst

Publisher: 010 Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 470

View: 840

Summary: The British architect Sir Edwin Lutyens (1869-1944) designed 140 cemeteries in the countryside of Flanders and Northern France for soldiers killed in the First World War. The cemeteries can be regarded as an imprint, as it were, of the former battlefront on the map of Europe. All are designed to principles established beforehand, including uniform gravestones, a large Stone of Remembrance and a large cross. Yet the difference in size, alignment and provenance make them all unique variations on the themes in question. The most memorable aspects are their meticulously chosen position in the landscape, the varied selection of trees and other greenery and the architecture of the entrance and shelter buildings. This illustrated book charts the history of the designs and exposes the underlying principle of order and variation in the architecture in an exhaustive landscape-architectural analysis. All 140 cemeteries are fully documented with references to the places where they are to be found.

The Oxford Illustrated History of the First World War

New Edition

Author: Hew Strachan

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 633

The First World War, now a century ago, still shapes the world in which we live, and its legacy lives on, in poetry, in prose, in collective memory and political culture. By the time the war ended in 1918, millions lay dead. Three major empires lay shattered by defeat, those of Germany, Austria-Hungary, and the Ottomans. A fourth, Russia, was in the throes of a revolution that helped define the rest of the twentieth century. The Oxford History of the First World War brings together in one volume many of the most distinguished historians of the conflict, in an account that matches the scale of the events. From its causes to its consequences, from the Western Front to the Eastern, from the strategy of the politicians to the tactics of the generals, they chart the course of the war and assess its profound political and human consequences. Chapters on economic mobilization, the impact on women, the role of propaganda, and the rise of socialism establish the wider context of the fighting at sea and in the air, and which ranged on land from the trenches of Flanders to the mountains of the Balkans and the deserts of the Middle East. First published for the 90th anniversary of the 1918 Armistice, this highly illustrated revised edition contains significant new material to mark the 100th anniversary of the war's outbreak.

A Nation in Arms

Author: Ian F. W. Beckett

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 276

View: 816

The Great War was the first conflict to draw men and women into uniform on a massive scale. From a small regular force of barely 250,000, the British Army rapidly expanded into a national force of over five million. A Nation in Arms brings together original research into the impact of the war on the army as an institution, gives a revealing account of those who served in it and offers fascinating insights into its social history during one of the bloodiest wars.

Stretcher Bearer!

Fighting for Life in the Trenches

Author: Charles Horton

Publisher: Lion Books

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 176

View: 831

Among the thousands of men who shivered and suffered in the trenches during the First World War, some did not even have the protection of a weapon. Members of the Royal Army Medical Corps (the RAMC) were there not to take lives, but to save them. Many chose this difficult and dangerous work because of their principles - including volunteer Charles Horton, who went through the horrors of Passchendaele, Ypres and the Somme, fighting to get the injured away from the guns, to the safety of the field hospitals and beyond. After the war, Horton felt that the RAMC and their sacrifices were forgotten, and so in 1970 he wrote down his memories. In this glorious book, full of first hand detail, he takes us back to the trenches in France and the mountains of Italy. This is a wonderful authentic account into one man's struggle to survive - and to keep others alive. With the approval of Horton's family, author Dale le Vack has edited Horton's journals for clarity, and added more text to provide background. The result is a superb memoir of one of the darkest periods in history.

Men, Ideas, and Tanks

British Military Thought and Armoured Forces, 1903-1939

Author: J. P. Harris

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 342

View: 832

Men, ideas and tanks reviews the development of British military ideas on armoured forces from 1903 to 1939. Great Britain was the nation which first developed the tank, first used it in action and first gained dramatic results by employment. The British continued to be world leaders in the field of mechanised warfare until the early 1930s.J. P. Harris offers strikingly new interpretations of the early history of British armoured forces and explains why Great Britain had lost the lead by the outbreak of the Second World War.Available in paperback once more, this work will be of interest to all those concerned with British military history in the first half of the twentieth century, with the history of mechanised warfare and with the history of military thought.

Stalin

Paradoxes of Power, 1878-1928

Author: Stephen Kotkin

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 976

View: 775

A magnificent new biography that revolutionizes our understanding of Stalin and his world It has the quality of myth: a poor cobbler’s son, a seminarian from an oppressed outer province of the Russian empire, reinvents himself as a top leader in a band of revolutionary zealots. When the band seizes control of the country in the aftermath of total world war, the former seminarian ruthlessly dominates the new regime until he stands as absolute ruler of a vast and terrible state apparatus, with dominion over Eurasia. While still building his power base within the Bolshevik dictatorship, he embarks upon the greatest gamble of his political life and the largest program of social reengineering ever attempted: the collectivization of all agriculture and industry across one sixth of the earth. Millions will die, and many more millions will suffer, but the man will push through to the end against all resistance and doubts. Where did such power come from? In Stalin, Stephen Kotkin offers a biography that, at long last, is equal to this shrewd, sociopathic, charismatic dictator in all his dimensions. The character of Stalin emerges as both astute and blinkered, cynical and true believing, people oriented and vicious, canny enough to see through people but prone to nonsensical beliefs. We see a man inclined to despotism who could be utterly charming, a pragmatic ideologue, a leader who obsessed over slights yet was a precocious geostrategic thinker—unique among Bolsheviks—and yet who made egregious strategic blunders. Through it all, we see Stalin’s unflinching persistence, his sheer force of will—perhaps the ultimate key to understanding his indelible mark on history. Stalin gives an intimate view of the Bolshevik regime’s inner geography of power, bringing to the fore fresh materials from Soviet military intelligence and the secret police. Kotkin rejects the inherited wisdom about Stalin’s psychological makeup, showing us instead how Stalin’s near paranoia was fundamentally political, and closely tracks the Bolshevik revolution’s structural paranoia, the predicament of a Communist regime in an overwhelmingly capitalist world, surrounded and penetrated by enemies. At the same time, Kotkin demonstrates the impossibility of understanding Stalin’s momentous decisions outside of the context of the tragic history of imperial Russia. The product of a decade of intrepid research, Stalin is a landmark achievement, a work that recasts the way we think about the Soviet Union, revolution, dictatorship, the twentieth century, and indeed the art of history itself. Stalin: Waiting for Hitler, 1929-1941 will be published by Penguin Press in October 2017