From Antietam to Gettysburg

A Civil War Coloring Book

Author: Peter F. Copeland

Publisher: Courier Corporation

ISBN:

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 48

View: 363

Forty-five precise black-and-white illustrations document great battles, generals of the War Between the States. Pickett's charge at Cemetery Ridge; Union Army retreat from Fredericksburg; portraits of Lee, Meade, Hood, other generals. Detailed, informative captions. Valuable learning tool, enjoyable coloring experience.

Ohio at Antietam: The Buckeye State’s Sacrifice on America’s Bloodiest Day

Author: Kevin R. Pawlak and Dan Welch

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 160

View: 928

Among the thousands who fought in the pivotal Battle of Antietam were scores of Ohioans. Sending eleven regiments and two batteries to the fight, the Buckeye State lost hundreds during the Maryland Campaign's first engagement, South Mountain, and hundreds more "gave their last full measure of devotion" at the Cornfield, the Bloody Lane and Burnside's Bridge. Many of these brave men are buried at the Antietam National Cemetery. Aged veterans who survived the ferocious contest returned to Antietam in the early 1900s to fight for and preserve the memory of their sacrifices all those years earlier. Join Kevin Pawlak and Dan Welch as they explore Ohio's role during those crucial hours on September 17, 1862.

Antietam And Gettysburg: Tactical Success In An Operational Void

Author: Lt.-Cmdr Stephen P. Black USN

Publisher: Pickle Partners Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 39

View: 264

The Battles of Antietam and Gettysburg are widely recognized as tactical victories for the Union’s Army of the Potomac. Following both battles, however, the respective commanding generals. General McClellan and General Meade, were sharply criticized for having failed to vigorously pursue General Lee and his Army of Northern Virginia in order to deliver a decisive blow. Both Union commanders offered a list of extenuating circumstances, such as battle fatigue, large casualties and lack of supplies, which precluded a “premature” pursuit of General Lee. Upon examination, however, their inability to conceptualize a decisive pursuit of General Lee’s army points to a direct failure at the operational level of War. Both Union generals were unable to link their tactical victories to any larger strategic objective. The reasons for this from the strategic confusion of a conflict evolving from limited War to total War, and from the void in operational training that left both McClellan and Meade ill prepared to perform successfully at this critical level of Warfare. Examining this operational void, it becomes apparent that a commander’s construct of War must be complete, that is, fully cognizant of the strategic, operational and tactical levels of War, in order to achieve success beyond the limits of the tactical battlefield. Such an examination points to the criticality of the operational level of Warfare, highlights the importance of the commander’s concept of operations and suggests that an operational commander must grow in the sense that his cognitive processes must be tuned into the dynamics of his environment, not only on a tactical level, but on the operational and strategic level.

First for the Union

Life and Death in a Civil War Army Corps from Antietam to Gettysburg

Author: Darin Wipperman

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 360

View: 172

The Army of the Potomac’s First Corps was one of the best corps in the entire Union army. In September 1862, it was chosen to spearhead the Union attack at Antietam, fighting Stonewall Jackson’s men in the Cornfield and at the Dunker Church. In July 1863 at Gettysburg, its men were the first Union infantry to reach the battle, where they relieved the cavalry and fought off the Confederate onslaught all day before retreating to Cemetery Hill. Their valiant stand west of Gettysburg saved the Union from disaster that day but came at great cost (60 percent casualties). The corps was disbanded the following spring, having bled itself out of existence. The First Corps’ leadership included two generals who would rise to command the Army of the Potomac—Joseph Hooker and George Meade—and a third who refused that command, John Reynolds, often considered the best commander in the East until his death at Gettysburg. The corps was made up heavily of men from New York and Pennsylvania (including the famous Bucktails), with a handful of New England regiments and the Midwesterners of the Iron Brigade, perhaps the Civil War’s most famous Union brigade. Corps histories remain one of the last gaps in Civil War military history. Hundreds of regimental histories have been written since war’s end, many brigades have been covered, the armies have been explored . . . but corps remain relatively overlooked—not because they are an unimportant or unappealing subject, but because mastering the subject is so difficult, requiring knowledge of many commanders’ careers, dozens of constituent units, and many battles. Few are willing to tackle the subject. Lucky for us, Darin Wipperman has taken on the task and produced a monumental history of the Army of the Potomac’s First Corps, well written and deftly told, an exciting story in itself and, like all great unit histories, one that is representative of the many other corps in the Union army.

The Maps of Antietam

An Atlas of Theantietamsharpsburg Campaign, Including the Battle of South Mountain,september 2 - 20, 1862

Author: Bradley M. Gottfried

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 153

This magisterial work breaks down the entire campaign into 21 map sets enriched with 124 original full-page color maps. These spectacular cartographic creations bore down to the regimental and battery level. Opposite each map is a full facing page of detailed text to make the story of General Lee's invasion into Maryland come alive.

The North and the South

At Antietam and Gettysburg

Author: William Edward Spear

Publisher: Kessinger Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 186

View: 960

This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original. Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages. Because we believe this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment for protecting, preserving, and promoting the world's literature in affordable, high quality, modern editions that are true to the original work.

From Second Bull Run to Gettysburg

The Civil War in the East, 1862-63

Author: Edward J. Stackpole

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 608

View: 299

Stackpole Books presents Gen. Edward J. Stackpole’s Civil War classics -- They Met at Gettysburg, Drama on the Rappahannock, Chancellorsville, and From Cedar Mountain to Antietam -- in a single abridged volume that covers the war’s pivotal and turbulent middle year in the Eastern Theater, from the summer of 1862 through the summer of 1863. This year of bloody conflict included the war’s defining battles: Second Bull Run, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, and Gettysburg. It was a year during which the Union cycled through generals as Lincoln sought one who could fight and win – from McClellan to Pope for Second Bull Run, back to McClellan for Antietam, to Burnside for Fredericksburg, to Hooker for Chancellorsville, and to Meade for Gettysburg. As Union command in the East remained unsettled and these generals proved incompetent, timid, or both – or worse – this was the South’s chance, and Lee came into his own as a general for the ages during these months, besting Pope at Second Bull Run, decimating Burnside at Fredericksburg, and outsmarting and outfighting Hooker, with help from Stonewall Jackson, at Chancellorsville. Lee, with a growing belief in his army’s invincibility and an awareness that the Union’s considerable resources in men and material would soon tell, twice mounted invasions of the North during these months, first at Antietam, where he fought McClellan to a draw but had to turn back, and last and more disastrously at Gettysburg, where Meade defeated Lee in three days of hard fighting and sent the Confederates reeling back to Virginia. This was also the year during which Lincoln gave the war higher purpose and greater stakes: Antietam enabled him to issue the Emancipation Proclamation while Gettysburg yielded the famous address. The new birth of freedom Lincoln promised would be won or lost on the battlefield. This is epic history, told in sweeping, dramatic style by a master of the craft. One battle flows seamlessly to the next in Stackpole’s grand narrative, which also turns a soldier’s eye to the leadership of the men in blue and gray. This book will find enthusiastic readers among general readers as well as among Civil War buffs, military history aficionados, and military officers seeking insightful professional reading.

The Battle of Gettysburg

A History Perspectives Book

Author: Roberta Baxter

Publisher: Cherry Lake

ISBN:

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 32

View: 552

This book relays the factual details of the Battle of Gettysburg that took place during the U.S. Civil War. The narrative provides multiple accounts of the event, and readers learn details through the point of view of a Confederate soldier, a Union soldier, and a woman merchant near the battle. The text offers opportunities to compare and contrast various perspectives in the text while gathering and analyzing information about an historical event.

The Civil War Turning Points in the East

The Battle of Antietam and the Battle of Gettysburg

Author: Charles River Charles River Editors

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 238

View: 179

*Includes pictures of important people, places, and events. *Includes maps of the battles. *Comprehensively covers the entire Maryland Campaign of 1862 and the Pennsylvania campaign of 1863, as well as the aftermath and legacies of the battles. *Analyzes the generalship of the battles' most important leaders, including Lee, McClellan, Longstreet, Meade, and more. *Includes bibliographies for further reading. "The fact of the matter is that George G. Meade, unexpectedly and against all odds, thoroughly outgeneraled Robert E. Lee at Gettysburg." - Stephen Sears "Those in whose judgment I rely tell me that I fought the battle splendidly and that it was a masterpiece of art. ... I feel I have done all that can be asked in twice saving the country. ... I feel some little pride in having, with a beaten & demoralized army, defeated Lee so utterly." - George McClellan The bloodiest day in American history took place on the 75th anniversary of the signing of the Constitution. On September 17, 1862, Robert E. Lee's Confederate Army of Northern Virginia fought George McClellan's Union Army of the Potomac outside Sharpsburg along Antietam Creek. That day, nearly 25,000 would become casualties, and Lee's army would barely survive fighting the much bigger Northern army. Although the battle was tactically a draw, it resulted in forcing Lee's army out of Maryland and back into Virginia, making it a strategic victory for the North and an opportune time for President Abraham Lincoln to issue the Emancipation Proclamation, freeing all slaves in the rebellious states. Less than a year later, the most famous battle of the Civil War took place outside of the small town of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, which happened to be a transportation hub, serving as the center of a wheel with several roads leading out to other Pennsylvanian towns. From July 1-3, Robert E. Lee's Confederate Army of Northern Virginia tried everything in its power to decisively defeat George Meade's Union Army of the Potomac, unleashing ferocious assaults that inflicted nearly 50,000 casualties in all. Day 1 of the battle would have been one of the 25 biggest battles of the Civil War itself, and it ended with a tactical Confederate victory. But over the next two days, Lee would try and fail to dislodge the Union army with attacks on both of its flanks during the second day and Pickett's Charge on the third and final day. Meade's stout defense held, barely, repulsing each attempted assault, handing the Union a desperately needed victory that ended up being one of the Civil War's turning points. After the South had lost the war, the importance of Antietam and Gettysburg was apparent to everyone, making the battles all the more important in the years after it had been fought. While former Confederate generals cast about for scapegoats, with various officers pointing fingers at Robert E. Lee, James Longstreet, and James Stuart, historians and avid Civil War fans became obsessed with studying and analyzing all the command decisions and army movements during the campaigns. Despite the saturation of coverage, millions of Americans continue visiting the two battlefields. The Civil War Turning Points in the East comprehensively covers the two crucial campaigns, analyzing Lee's invasion strategies, the Union's response, and the generalship of the most important commanders of the battles. Along with bibliographies, maps of the battle, and pictures of important people and places, you will learn about the Antietam and Gettysburg like you never have before.

A Field Guide to Antietam

Experiencing the Battlefield through Its History, Places, and People

Author: Carol Reardon

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 360

View: 432

The Battle of Antietam took place on September 17, 1862, and still stands as the bloodiest single day in American military history. Additionally, in its aftermath, President Abraham Lincoln issued his famous Emancipation Proclamation. In this engaging, easy-to-use guide, Carol Reardon and Tom Vossler allow visitors to understand this crucial Civil War battle in fine detail. Abundantly illustrated with maps and historical and modern photographs, A Field Guide to Antietam explores twenty-one sites on and near the battlefield where significant action occurred. Combining crisp narrative and rich historical context, each stop in the book is structured around the following questions: *What happened here? *Who fought here? *Who commanded here? *Who fell here? *Who lived here? *How did participants remember the events? With accessible presentation and fresh interpretations of primary and secondary evidence, this is an absolutely essential guide to Antietam and its lasting legacy.

Antietam & Gettysburg in the Newspapers

Author: Cw Whitehair

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 128

View: 653

The battles of Antietam and Gettysburg were two of the most important Civil War engagements in the Eastern Theater during America's Civil War. The battle of Antietam, fought during the autumn of 1862, became known in history as the single-bloodiest day of the war, and allowed President Abraham Lincoln the opportunity to issue the Emancipation Proclamation.The battle of Gettysburg took place during the summer of 1863. The conflict became known as the high-tide of the Confederacy after General Robert E. Lee and his Army of Northern Virginia suffered a significant defeat after three days of fighting against General George Meade's Army of the Potomac. Many historians and authors have written about the two major battles and the strategies behind the success, defeat, and impact on soldiers and civilians. "Antietam & Gettysburg in the Newspapers" differs because war journalist viewed the two battles and reported first-hand on events they witnessed. The news stories are from national and local, and official military reports printed in the "Valley News Echo" newspaper.

Story of Dangerous Wars

Story of Battle of Antietam, Battle of Gettysburg, Battle of New Orleans, Battle of Stalingrad, Battle of the Atlantic

Author: Dhirubhai Patel

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 516

View: 566

This book cover biggest 5 wars. (1) Battle of Antietam The Battle of Antietam, or Battle of Sharpsburg particularly in the Southern United States, was a battle of the American Civil War fought on September 17, 1862 between Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee's (2) Battle of Gettysburg The Battle of Gettysburg was fought July 1-3, 1863, in and around the town of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, by Union and Confederate forces during the American Civil War (3) Battle of New Orleans The Battle of New Orleans was fought on January 8, 1815 between the British Army under Major General Sir Edward Pakenham and the United States Army under Brevet Major General Andrew Jackson, roughly 5 miles southeast of the French Quarter of New Orleans, in the current suburb of Chalmette, Louisiana. (4) Battle of Stalingrad In the Battle of Stalingrad, Germany and its allies fought the Soviet Union for control of the city of Stalingrad in Southern Russia. (5) Battle of the Atlantic The Battle of the Atlantic, the longest continuous military campaign in World War II, ran from 1939 to the defeat of Nazi Germany in 1945, covering a major part of the naval history of World War II.

The Civil War Turning Points in the East: the Battle of Antietam and the Battle of Gettysburg

Author: Charles River Charles River Editors

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 130

View: 622

*Includes pictures of important people, places, and events. *Includes maps of the battles. *Comprehensively covers the entire Maryland Campaign of 1862 and the Pennsylvania campaign of 1863, as well as the aftermath and legacies of the battles. *Analyzes the generalship of the battles' most important leaders, including Lee, McClellan, Longstreet, Meade, and more. *Includes bibliographies for further reading. "The fact of the matter is that George G. Meade, unexpectedly and against all odds, thoroughly outgeneraled Robert E. Lee at Gettysburg." - Stephen Sears "Those in whose judgment I rely tell me that I fought the battle splendidly and that it was a masterpiece of art. ... I feel I have done all that can be asked in twice saving the country. ... I feel some little pride in having, with a beaten & demoralized army, defeated Lee so utterly." - George McClellan The bloodiest day in American history took place on the 75th anniversary of the signing of the Constitution. On September 17, 1862, Robert E. Lee's Confederate Army of Northern Virginia fought George McClellan's Union Army of the Potomac outside Sharpsburg along Antietam Creek. That day, nearly 25,000 would become casualties, and Lee's army would barely survive fighting the much bigger Northern army. Although the battle was tactically a draw, it resulted in forcing Lee's army out of Maryland and back into Virginia, making it a strategic victory for the North and an opportune time for President Abraham Lincoln to issue the Emancipation Proclamation, freeing all slaves in the rebellious states. Less than a year later, the most famous battle of the Civil War took place outside of the small town of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, which happened to be a transportation hub, serving as the center of a wheel with several roads leading out to other Pennsylvanian towns. From July 1-3, Robert E. Lee's Confederate Army of Northern Virginia tried everything in its power to decisively defeat George Meade's Union Army of the Potomac, unleashing ferocious assaults that inflicted nearly 50,000 casualties in all. Day 1 of the battle would have been one of the 25 biggest battles of the Civil War itself, and it ended with a tactical Confederate victory. But over the next two days, Lee would try and fail to dislodge the Union army with attacks on both of its flanks during the second day and Pickett's Charge on the third and final day. Meade's stout defense held, barely, repulsing each attempted assault, handing the Union a desperately needed victory that ended up being one of the Civil War's turning points. After the South had lost the war, the importance of Antietam and Gettysburg was apparent to everyone, making the battles all the more important in the years after it had been fought. While former Confederate generals cast about for scapegoats, with various officers pointing fingers at Robert E. Lee, James Longstreet, and James Stuart, historians and avid Civil War fans became obsessed with studying and analyzing all the command decisions and army movements during the campaigns. Despite the saturation of coverage, millions of Americans continue visiting the two battlefields. The Civil War Turning Points in the East comprehensively covers the two crucial campaigns, analyzing Lee's invasion strategies, the Union's response, and the generalship of the most important commanders of the battles. Along with bibliographies, maps of the battle, and pictures of important people and places, you will learn about the Antietam and Gettysburg like you never have before.

The Battle of Antietam

The Bloodiest Day

Author: Ted Alexander

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 192

View: 804

The heavy fog that shrouded Antietam Creek on the morning of September 17, 1862, was disturbed by the boom of Federal artillery fire. The carnage and chaos began in the East Woods and Cornfield and continued inexorably on as McClellan’s and Lee’s troops collided at the West Woods, Bloody Lane and Burnside Bridge. Though outnumbered, the Rebels still managed to hold their ground until nightfall. Chief historian of the Antietam National Battlefield, Ted Alexander renders a fresh and gripping portrayal of the battle, its aftermath, the effect on the civilians of Sharpsburg and the efforts to preserve the hallowed spot. Maps by master cartographer Steven Stanley add further depth to Alexander’s account of the Battle of Antietam.

Landscape Turned Red

The Battle of Antietam

Author: Stephen W. Sears

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 466

View: 100

“The best account of the Battle of Antietam” from the award-winning, national bestselling author of Gettysburg and Chancellorsville (The New York Times Book Review). The Civil War battle waged on September 17, 1862, at Antietam Creek, Maryland, was one of the bloodiest in the nation’s history: in this single day, the war claimed nearly 23,000 casualties. In Landscape Turned Red, the renowned historian Stephen Sears draws on a remarkable cache of diaries, dispatches, and letters to recreate the vivid drama of Antietam as experienced not only by its leaders but also by its soldiers, both Union and Confederate. Combining brilliant military analysis with narrative history of enormous power, Landscape Turned Red is the definitive work on this climactic and bitter struggle. “A modern classic.”—The Chicago Tribune “No other book so vividly depicts that battle, the campaign that preceded it, and the dramatic political events that followed.”—The Washington Post Book World “Authoritative and graceful . . . a first-rate work of history.”—Newsweek

In the Footsteps of Alexander Gardner at Antietam and Gettysburg

A Meditation on the Power of the Battlefield Imagery of Alexander Gardner

Author: Keith Steiner (Photographer)

Publisher: Matador

ISBN:

Category: Antietam National Battlefield (Md.)

Page: 72

View: 546

In search of Alexander Gardner, the author travels to America to walk the battle sites immortalised in the photographs of his hero, Scots-born Alexander Gardner.Since his first encounter as a impressionable teenager with Gardner’s photographs of the aftermath of the battle of Antietam, Keith Steiner has come to believe that Gardner’s battlefield photographs are key historic documents of the conflict. He also believes that Gardner’s status as one of the greatest of photographers remains unrecognised and his achievement is often overlooked by history in favour of his one-time employer Matthew Brady.Forty years after that dramatic first encounter, the author stood on the same ground at Antietam and at Gettysburg where his hero exposed the classic photographs. On this same ground, he began to gain an understanding of the source of the power and continuing presence of Gardner’s artistic legacy, and of the mystery of his imagery. In order to understand the enduring nature of the imagery, the book travels back in time, but also looks to the present and future, to meditate on the meaning of imagery. Steiner considers Gardner’s ‘debt’ to the work of WHF Talbot, and the ‘debt’ that modern photography and cine-photography owes to him; a debt that may have been gently acknowledged recently in the Hollywood feature film Lincoln, which contains references to Alexander Gardner.Whilst in America, the author also made an attempt to discover if Lewis H Steiner, a Union officer in the Sanitary Commission in 1862, was one of his own antecedents. Steiner was known to have been active in the area of Maryland around the time of the battle of Antietam. Although this remains unsolved, his travels led to a discovery in the form of a more profound understanding of the mystery and power of the photography of Alexander Gardner. In the Footsteps of Alexander Gardner at Antietam and Gettysburg will appeal to American civil war enthusiasts and anyone interested in the history and theory of photography. It is being released this year, recognising the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg.

The North and the South at Antietam and Gettysburg (Classic Reprint)

Author: William E. Spear

Publisher: Forgotten Books

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 186

View: 734

Excerpt from The North and the South at Antietam and Gettysburg P The incidents of this engagement; the momen tous (l?) change of the word communications into 'communication, either by the slee. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

To Antietam Creek

The Maryland Campaign of September 1862

Author: David S. Hartwig

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 808

View: 939

McClellan as commander of the Army of the Potomac through the Confederate invasion, the siege and capture of Harpers Ferry, the daylong Battle of South Mountain, and, ultimately, to the eve of the great and terrible Battle of Antietam.