Freedom in Exile

The Autobiography of His Holiness the Dalai Lama of Tibet

Author:

Publisher: Little Brown

ISBN:

Category: Dalai lamas

Page: 324

View: 540

In 1938 a two year old boy was recognised through a traditional process of discovery as being the reincarnation of all previous Dalai Lamas, the spiritual rulers of Tibet. Taken away from his parents, he was brought up in Lhasa according to a monastic regimen of rigorous austerity and in almost total isolation. Aged seven he was enthroned in the 1000-room Potala palace as the supreme spiritual leader of a nation the size of Western Europe, with population of six million. And at fifteen, he became head of state. With Tibet under threat from the newly Communist Chinese, there followed a traumatic decade during which he became the confidant of both Chairman Mao and Jawaharal Nehru as he tried to maintain autonomy for his people. Then in 1959, he was finally forced into exile - followed by over 100,000 destitute refugees. Here, in his own words, he describes what it was like to grow up revered as a deity among his people, reveals his innermost feelings about his role, and discusses the mysteries of Tibetan Buddhism.

Polyphony Embodied - Freedom and Fate in Gao Xingjian’s Writings

Author: Michael Lackner

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 271

View: 596

Like artists, important writers defy unequivocal interpretations. Gao Xingjian, winner of the Nobel Prize in literature, is a cosmopolitan writer, deeply rooted in the Chinese past while influenced by paragons of Western Modernity. The present volume is less interested in a general discussion on the multitude of aspects in Gao's works and even less in controversies concerning their aesthetic value than in obtaining a response to the crucial issues of freedom and fate from a clearly defined angle. The very nature of the answer to the question of freedom and fate within Gao Xingjian's works can be called a polyphonic one: thereare affirmative as well as skeptical voices. But polyphony, as embodied by Gao, is an even more multifaceted phenomenon. Most important for our contention is the fact that Gao Xingjian's aesthetic experience embodies prose, theater, painting, and film. Taken together, they form a Gesamtkunstwerk whose diversity of voices characterizes every single one of them.

Exiled

Voices of the Southern Baptist Convention Holy War

Author: Carl L. Kell

Publisher: Univ. of Tennessee Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 194

View: 494

It has been one of the major news stories in religion and culture of the past twenty-five years. From 1979 to 1995, the Southern Baptist Convention (SBC) was rocked by assaults on its leadership by fundamentalists, who used questionable tactics to gain top positions and then used their power to purge Baptist seminary presidents and professors, church pastors, lay leaders, and women from positions of responsibility. America's largest Christian, non-Catholic denomination is firmly locked in a "holy war" to secure its churches and membership for a never-ending struggle against a liberal culture. Exiled: Voices of the Southern Baptist Convention Holy War is a compilation of first-person narratives by conservative and moderate ministers and lay leaders who were stripped of their positions and essentially became pariahs in the churches to which they had devoted their lives. While other books have described the takeover in historical, political, and theological terms, Exiled is different. Individual people tell their personal stories, revealing the struggle and heartache that resulted from being vilified, dispossessed, and exiled. Kell includes a variety of perspectives-from lay preachers and church members to prominent former SBC leaders such as James Dunn and Carolyn Crumpler. The emotion captured on the pages-sadness, shock, disbelief, resignation, and anger-will make Exiled moving even to readers who know little about the Southern Baptist movement. Exiled will also be of particular interest to historians, sociologists, philosophers of religion, and rhetorical historians.

Dalai Lama

Author: EPUB 2-3

Publisher: Infobase Learning

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 776

CHBiographies

Sacraments in Scripture

Salvation History Made Present

Author: Tim Gray

Publisher: Emmaus Road Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 96

View: 835

Delves into the biblical origin for each of these masterpieces of God's love.Gray guides readers through the Gospels, showing Christ's deliberate acts to inaugurate these sacred signs as the foundation of the New Covenant.

Encyclopedia of Monasticism

Author: William M. Johnston

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Reference

Page: 2000

View: 459

First published in 2000. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Tibet's Forgotten Heroes

The Story of Tibet's Armed Resistance Against China

Author: Birgit van de Wijer

Publisher: Amberley Publishing Limited

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 258

View: 369

The first hand interviews as well as the translation into English were conducted by native Tibetans. The book is the result of a two years work with dozens of Tibetans involved.

Tibet

The Road Ahead

Author: Dawa Norbu

Publisher: Random House

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 416

View: 123

Tibet: The Road Ahead is the extraordinary account of the potential extinction of a civilisation. Written by a gifted Tibetan of humble origins, this book tells the story of ordinary Tibetans in the twentieth century. Professor Norbu refutes China's claim that Tibet has been part of China since the seventh century AD, showing how the relationship between the two countries was symbolic and ceremonial, rather than one of political suppression. He portrays pre-1950 Tibet as a place of complete and genuine freedom, in stark contrast with recent events in the region. Beautifully written and offering a fresh, incisive look at the road ahead for Tibet in post-Deng China, this book will appeal to all those fascinated by, and concerned for 'the land of the snows'.

Robert Mugabe and the Betrayal of Zimbabwe

Author: Andrew Norman

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 189

View: 186

Instead of leading his people to the “promised land,” Mugabe, the first prime minister of the newly-named Zimbabwe, has amassed a fortune for himself, his family and followers and has presided over the murder, torture and starvation of those who oppose him. This biography offers some explanations for Mugabe’s behavior. With the death of his wife in 1992, a moderating influence was lost, and as the years go by, he continues to show himself intolerant of any opposition as he proceeds toward the creation of a one-party state, even though evidence suggests that his country is in terminal decline.

Approaching Freedom

An Exile's Quest for a New Self

Author: Maria A. Nodarse

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 384

View: 296

A probing tale of an exile's quest for a new self, Approaching Freedom follows Maria Nodarse's journey from her arrival as a Cuban political refugee in 1960s America to her return to her native land in 1979. Nodarse is fifteen when her family settles in a white middle-class New Jersey town. In Cuba she had attended the same private American school since kindergarten. At Ridgefield Park High School when she's instructed to take part in the pledge of allegiance Nodarse cannot help but feel extremely alienated. When her classmates ask her, "Do you wear shoes in Cuba?" and she's forbidden to speak her own language on the school grounds, she starts looking for somewhere to hide. Alone in this new reality, with one brother studying medicine in Mexico and the other imprisoned after the Bay of Pigs fiasco, Nodarse resents the role assigned to Cuban women. After her father loses his job he announces "We're all moving to Miami." Nodarse is not so sure. She has other ideas about her life even though it might cause her parents to stop talking to her. She knows the decision she makes will set the stage for the rest of her life. What she doesn't know is how a headstrong young Latina can find her way through the maze of feminist, social, and political revolutions of the 60' and 70's without losing herself or the small family she has left. As an exile, she's left everything behind --her identity, her language, her land, her culture, her people. In Miami her compatriots have found ways to mediate these losses; they have formed an ethnic enclave that provides the warmth and acceptance of home. Nodarse refuses this consolation and moves to Manhattan. After graduating from Columbia she returns to Cuba, seeking what she lost.