Francis Bacon’s Contribution to Shakespeare

A New Attribution Method

Author: Barry R. Clarke

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 310

View: 469

Francis Bacon's Contribution to Shakespeare advocates a paradigm shift away from a single-author theory of the Shakespeare work towards a many-hands theory. Here, the middle ground is adopted between competing so-called Stratfordian and alternative single-author conspiracy theories. In the process, arguments are advanced as to why Shakespeare’s First Folio (1623) presents as an unreliable document for attribution, and why contemporary opinion characterised Shakspere [his baptised name] as an opportunist businessman who acquired the work of others. Current methods of authorship attribution are critiqued, and an entirely new Rare Collocation Profiling (RCP) method is introduced which, unlike current stylometric methods, is capable of detecting multiple contributors to a text. Using the Early English Books Online database, rare phrases and collocations in a target text are identified together with the authors who used them. This allows a DNA-type profile to be constructed for the possible contributors to a text that also takes into account direction of influence. The method brings powerful new evidence to bear on crucial questions such as the author of the Groats-worth of Witte (1592) letter, the identifiable hands in 3 Henry VI, the extent of Francis Bacon’s contribution to Twelfth Night and The Tempest, and the scheduling of Love’s Labour’s Lost at the 1594–5 Gray’s Inn Christmas revels for which Bacon wrote entertainments. The treatise also provides detailed analyses of the nature of the complaint against Shakspere in the Groats-worth letter, the identity of the players who performed The Comedy of Errors at Gray’s Inn in 1594, and the reasons why Shakspere could not have had access to Virginia colony information that appears in The Tempest. With a Foreword by Sir Mark Rylance, this meticulously researched and penetrating study is a thought-provoking read for the inquisitive student in Shakespeare Studies.

Francis Bacon's Contribution to Shakespeare

A New Attribution Method

Author: Barry R. Clarke

Publisher: Routledge Studies in Shakespeare

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 310

View: 904

Francis Bacon's Contribution to Shakespeare advocates a paradigm shift away from a single-author theory of the Shakespeare work towards a many-hands theory. Here, the middle ground is adopted between competing so-called Stratfordian and alternative single-author conspiracy theories. In the process, arguments are advanced as to why Shakespeare's First Folio (1623) presents as an unreliable document for attribution, and why contemporary opinion characterised Shakspere [his baptised name] as an opportunist businessman who acquired the work of others. Current methods of authorship attribution are critiqued, and an entirely new Rare Collocation Profiling (RCP) method is introduced which, unlike current stylometric methods, is capable of detecting multiple contributors to a text. Using the Early English Books Online database, rare phrases and collocations in a target text are identified together with the authors who used them. This allows a DNA-type profile to be constructed for the possible contributors to a text that also takes into account direction of influence. The method brings powerful new evidence to bear on crucial questions such as the author of the Groats-worth of Witte (1592) letter, the identifiable hands in 3 Henry VI, the extent of Francis Bacon's contribution to Twelfth Night and The Tempest, and the scheduling of Love's Labour's Lost at the 1594-5 Gray's Inn Christmas revels for which Bacon wrote entertainments. The treatise also provides detailed analyses of the nature of the complaint against Shakspere in the Groats-worth letter, the identity of the players who performed The Comedy of Errors at Gray's Inn in 1594, and the reasons why Shakspere could not have had access to Virginia colony information that appears in The Tempest. With a Foreword by Sir Mark Rylance, this meticulously researched and penetrating study is a thought-provoking read for the inquisitive student in Shakespeare Studies. complaint against Shakspere in the Groats-worth letter, the identity of the players who performed The Comedy of Errors at Gray's Inn in 1594, and the reasons why Shakspere could not have had access to Virginia colony information that appears in The Tempest. With a Foreword by Sir Mark Rylance, this meticulously researched and penetrating study is a thought-provoking read for the inquisitive student in Shakespeare Studies.

Bacon, Shakespeare and the Rosicrucians

Author: William Francis C. Wigston

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 310

View: 858

SIR FRANCIS BACON - SHAKESPEARE? Francis Bacon was among those who made the greatest contributions to the continuation of the inner wisdom. He is considered by many to be the father of modern science because of his advocacy of empiricism, or experimental confirmation. A famous Rosicrucian, he is considered by many to be the secret author of the works of William Shakespeare. Many indicators suggest this possibility. It is an idea worth considering since the works attributed to Shakespeare contain cryptograms that suggest Bacon as the author.

Who Wrote Bacon?

William Shakespeare, Francis Bacon and James I : a Mystery for the Twenty-first Century

Author: Richard Ramsbotham

Publisher: Temple Lodge Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 162

View: 647

For years, a popular debate has been raging about whether Shakespeare was really the author of the many plays and poems published under his name. Doubters argue that Shakespeare could not have accomplished such a great feat, pointing instead to other well-known figures. Richard Ramsbotham offers a completely different perspective by reexamining the available evidence and by introducing unexplored aspects of Rudolf Steiner's spiritual-scientific research. The author discusses Shakespeare's life as an actor, mysteries of the debate such as the enigmatic Psalm 46, and the persistent question of Francis Bacon's connection with Shakespeare. Recently, a movement has been gaining ground that sees Bacon himself as the covert writer of the great works attributed to Shakespeare. Not content with this radical claim, that movement also wishes to place Bacon on the primary pedestal of British civilization, as a kind of patron saint of the modern scientific age. The author provides substantial confirmation of a definite connection between Shakespeare and Bacon, but one that radically challenges the conclusions of the Baconian movement. The author also opens remarkable new perspectives on King James I and his connections not only with Shakespeare and Bacon but also with Jakob Böhme, Rudolf II, Rosicrucianism, Freemasonry, and the original Globe Theatre. Published 400 years after the Hampton Court Conference of 1604, Who Wrote Bacon? offers a timely contribution to these themes, and shows how they remain critically important to our understanding of the twenty-first century. Includes eight pages of B/W plates. C O N T E N T S Introduction 1. Shakespeare the Actor 2. A Rather Troublesome Patron 3. Traces in Bacon and Shakespeare 4. Who Wrote Bacon? 5. Great Britain's Solomon 6. Toward a Reconsideration of James I 7. Shakespeare--The Chief Musician

The Connection of Francis Bacon

With the First Folio of Shakespeare's Plays and With the Books on Cipher of His Time 1910

Author: Charles P. Bowditch

Publisher: Kessinger Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 108

View: 270

A contribution to the controversial claim that Francis Bacon wrote Shakespeare's plays. Includes cryptographic analysis of the First Folio and alleged included anagrams. Numerous beautiful plates and reproduced prints.

Francis Bacon Tudor Equals William Shakespeare

Author: Andrew Stevens Peck

Publisher: Nova Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 65

View: 372

'The Shakespeare Controversy', otherwise known as 'Who Wrote Shakespeare?', has been a literary problem for generations. Countless attempts have been made to show that someone other than Shakespeare, or some group of people, wrote the Plays and The Sonnets. Peck's method of solving this problem was to look for cipher (secret writing) that might reveal the real author. Rather than searching the thousands of lines of The Plays and The Sonnets for ciphers, he singled out the odd original epitaph on Shakespeare's tombstone as a possible source of a concealed message. The peculiarities of the inscription had coaxed others before him to grapple with its strange context. In this exciting book, the author has demonstrated the importance of mathematical probability in support of ciphers. The math is simplified by interesting explanations. With the ciphers, he then answers the question of authorship while tying Sir Francis Bacon to the Tudor family.

Shakespeare Bacon Conundrum

Direct Evidence of Francis Bacon's Shakespeare Authorship

Author: Russell Storrs Hall

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 273

View: 321

Since this book is being published posthumous, please allow me to share what I remember about my dad, the author. Russell Storrs Hall was the third son born to Olive Agar Hall and Bertine Anderson Hall on February 4th,1917 on the south side of Chicago, Illinois. I believe he was a very serious, sensitive, studious young man growing up, who was constantly reading and searching for answers. He possessed a high intellect and a profound curiosity. He attended college in Chicago, but soon after the Pearl Harbor attack, enlisted in the Army. At some point in time, his Company was sent to serve in Panama, Central America, where he became ill from the effects of the jungle. He received a medical discharge in 1943 and returned home to convalesce. On August 5th, 1945 he married my mother, Hildegard H. Bergt. When I was young, my father worked as an insurance underwriter for George F. Brown Insurance and LLoyds of London. In 1960, after sitting for a civil service exam, he changed careers and became a Postal Carrier. My parents divorced in 1968, and dad later remarried in 1971 to Lorraine R. Lawler. In 1982 he retired from the downtown Chicago Post Offifi ce as supervisor. My father’s lifetime passion and hobby was researching for this manuscript, and he dedicated his retirement years to writing this book. His wife Lorraine was his source of encouragement. He fifi nally completed his book only a few months before his death, February 10th, 1998. I am very proud to be his daughter, yours truly, Janice Gold-Orland.

Collecting Shakespeare

The Story of Henry and Emily Folger

Author: Stephen H. Grant

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 244

View: 287

In Collecting Shakespeare, Stephen H. Grant recounts the American success story of Henry and Emily Folger of Brooklyn, a couple who were devoted to each other, in love with Shakespeare, and bitten by the collecting bug. Shortly after marrying in 1885, the Folgers started buying, cataloging, and storing all manner of items about Shakespeare and his era. Emily earned a master's degree in Shakespeare studies. The frugal couple worked passionately as a tight-knit team during the Gilded Age, financing their hobby with the fortune Henry earned as president of Standard Oil Company of New York, where he was a trusted associate of John D. Rockefeller Sr. While a number of American universities offered to house the collection, the Folgers wanted to give it to the American people. Afraid the price of antiquarian books would soar if their names were revealed, they secretly acquired prime real estate on Capitol Hill near the Library of Congress. They commissioned the design and construction of an elegant building with a reading room, public exhibition hall, and the Elizabethan Theatre. The Folger Shakespeare Library was dedicated on the Bard's birthday, April 23, 1932. The library houses 82 First Folios, 275,000 books, and 60,000 manuscripts. It welcomes more than 100,000 visitors a year and provides professors, scholars, graduate students, and researchers from around the world with access to the collections. It is also a vibrant center in Washington, D.C., for cultural programs, including theater, concerts, lectures, and poetry readings. The library provided Grant with unprecedented access to the primary sources within the Folger vault. He draws on interviews with surviving Folger relatives and visits to 35 related archives in the United States and in Britain to create a portrait of the remarkable couple who ensured that Shakespeare would have a beautiful home in America.

Baconian Theory of Shakespearean Authorship

Francis Bacon, Delia Bacon, Baconian Theory, Ignatius L. Donnelly, James Wilmot, Bacon's Cipher

Author: Books Llc

Publisher: Books LLC, Wiki Series

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 78

View: 136

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 26. Chapters: Francis Bacon, Delia Bacon, Baconian theory, Ignatius L. Donnelly, William Henry Smith, James Wilmot, George Fabyan, Orville Ward Owen, James Wilde, 1st Baron Penzance, Bacon's cipher, Walter Conrad Arensberg, Hezekiah Lord Hosmer, Elizabeth Wells Gallup. Excerpt: The Baconian theory of Shakespearean authorship holds that Sir Francis Bacon, lawyer, philosopher, essayist and scientist, wrote the plays conventionally attributed to William Shakespeare, and that the historical Shakespeare was merely a front to shield the identity of Bacon, who could not take credit for the works because being known as a lowly playwright for the public stage would have impeded his ambition to hold high office. Bacon was the first alternative candidate suggested as the true author of Shakespeare's plays. The theory was first put forth in the mid-nineteenth century, based on perceived correspondences between the philosophical ideas found in Bacon's writings and the works of Shakespeare. Legal and autobiographical allusions and cryptographic ciphers and codes were later found in the plays and poems to buttress the theory. All but a few academic Shakespeare scholars reject the arguments for Bacon authorship, as well as those for all other alternative authors. The Baconian theory gained great popularity and attention in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century, although since the mid-twentieth century the primacy of his candidacy as the true author of the Shakespeare canon has been supplanted by that of Edward de Vere, 17th Earl of Oxford. Despite the academic consensus that Shakespeare wrote the works bearing his name and the decline of the theory, supporters of Bacon continue to argue for his candidacy through organizations, books, newsletters, and websites. Sir Francis Bacon was a major scientist, philosopher, courtier, diplomat, es...

The Shakespeare Enigma

Author: Peter Dawkins

Publisher: Polair Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 477

View: 864

Every so often a book comes along which forces us to reappraise key writers such as Shakespeare. THE SHAKESPEARE ENIGMA, by Peter Dawkins, special advisor to London's 'Shakespeare's Globe' theatre, is such a book. The writer of Shakespeare's plays and sonnets was a man of his time, deeply immersed in the religious and political struggles of the day, exceptionally well-versed in law, diplomacy, music and classical literature, and he was also widely traveled - much more so than the Stratford actor widely credited with their authorship today. Through his illuminating and detailed study of the plays and hints they contain about the author, Peter Dawkins guides us down a fascinating trail, following clues that may have been left by the writer himself for us to uncover, centuries later. A whole new perspective on the plays emerges. As his argument develops, Peter Dawkins places them very firmly in their political, religious and philosophical context and out of that new understanding he comes to startling and original conclusions as to the true identity of the author of Shakespeare's works. Like any good investigation, this book is compendious in its presentation of evidence and copiously illustrated. It will appeal to all literary-minded people, those interested in esoteric wisdom, and anyone involved in arts education. THE SHAKESPEARE ENIGMA also ties in well with modern attempts to understand how Elizabethans and Jacobeans regarded theatre, through such projects as Shakespeare's Globe on London's South Bank.

Shakespeare and Law

Author: Andrew Zurcher

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 352

View: 650

Readers of Shakespeare's language, from the playhouse to the classroom, have long been aware of his peculiar interest in legal words and concepts - Richard II's two bodies, Hamlet's quiddities and quillets, Pandarus' peine forte et dure. In this new study, Andrew Zurcher takes a fresh, historically sensitive look at Shakespeare's meticulous resort to legal language, texts, concepts, and arguments in a range of plays and poems. Following a preface that situates Shakespeare's life within the various legal communities of his Stratford and London periods, Zurcher reconsiders the ways in which Shakespeare adapts legal language and concepts to figure problems about being, knowing, reading, interpretation, and action. In challenging new readings of plays from King John and Henry IV to As You Like It and Hamlet, Shakespeare and Law reveals the importance of early modern common legal thinking to Shakespeare's representations of inheritance, possession, gift-giving, oath-swearing, contract, sovereignty, judgment, and conscience - and, finally, to our own reception and interpretation of his works.

The Shakespeare Claimants

A Critical Survey of the Four Principal Theories concerning the Authorship of the Shakespearean Plays

Author: H. N Gibson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 336

View: 732

This edition first published in 1962. The Shakespeare Claimants is a critical survey of the great controversy that has raged over the authorship of the Shakespearean plays. It provides the general reader with an outline history of this controversy and with a full description and analysis of the main anti-Stratfordian arguments. This book concentrates on the four main claimants: Bacon, Oxford, Derby and Marlowe. The book contains an extensive bibliography and footnotes to guide the reader through the text.

Francis Bacon

The History of a Character Assassination

Author: Nieves Mathews

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 592

View: 995

In 1621 Bacon fell from power as Lord Chancellor, the highest position in the land. Charged with accepting bribes, he was convicted, fined, imprisoned and exiled from the Court. He died five years later, disgraced and deeply in debt.

Shakespeare and Early Modern Religion

Author: David Loewenstein

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page:

View: 951

Written by an international team of literary scholars and historians, this collaborative volume illuminates the diversity of early modern religious beliefs and practices in Shakespeare's England, and considers how religious culture is imaginatively reanimated in Shakespeare's plays. Fourteen new essays explore the creative ways Shakespeare engaged with the multifaceted dimensions of Protestantism, Catholicism, non-Christian religions including Judaism and Islam, and secular perspectives, considering plays such as Hamlet, Julius Caesar, King John, King Lear, Macbeth, Measure for Measure, A Midsummer Night's Dream and The Winter's Tale. The collection is of great interest to readers of Shakespeare studies, early modern literature, religious studies, and early modern history.

The Shakespeare Controversy

An Analysis of the Authorship Theories, 2d ed.

Author: Warren Hope

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 260

View: 839

"The history of the Shakespeare controversy is presented in this revised edition of the 1992 work, with new information and additional chapters. Part I documents and assesses the important theories on the authorship question. Part II is an annotated bibliography, arranged chronologically, of the works that deal with the controversy from its vague beginnings to the present"--Provided by publisher.

The Genius of Shakespeare

Picador Classic

Author: Jonathan Bate

Publisher: Pan Macmillan

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 400

View: 603

With an introduction by Simon Callow Judgements about the quality of works of art begin in opinion. But for the last two hundred years only the wilfully perverse (and Tolstoy) have denied the validity of the opinion that Shakespeare was a genius. Who was Shakespeare? Why has his writing endured? And what makes it so endlessly adaptable to different times and cultures? Exploring Shakespeare's life, including questions of authorship and autobiography, and charting how his legacy has grown over the centuries, this extraordinary book asks how Shakespeare has come to be such a powerful symbol of genius. Written with lively passion and wit, The Genius of Shakespeare is a fascinating biography of the life - and afterlife - of our greatest poet. Jonathan Bate, one of the world's leading Shakespearean scholars, has shown how the legend of Shakespeare's genius was created and sustained, and how the man himself became a truly global phenomenon. 'The best modern book on Shakespeare' Sir Peter Hall

The Royal Secret

“Was Francis Bacon the Shakespeare genius?” A thrilling historical mystery of life & death revealing the power politics of today.

Author: John Ransome Bentley

Publisher: Meadow Grove

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 480

View: 439

Saving Shakespeares’ Bacon. A thrilling Tudor mystery of romance, intrigue and immortality. An exposé of mystery and intrigue links the power politics of today directly to the seamy spy rings of Queen Elizabeth 1st. Told through the eyes of Mrs G, an American women of today she seeks to uncover the truth of the death of the man she loves. The story reveals the tale of one of the world’s best known men whose rightful claim to the thrones of England and America has been concealed until this day. From Washington to London to Paris and the castles of the Templars, Mrs G has only weeks in which to decrypt clues from the distant past of the Kaballah and the bloodline of Christ himself. As she delves into a world of mysticism she exposes modern science to criticism in its suppression of a superior occult intelligence known only to those who have ruled the world down the Centuries, as they still do today.