Frames of War

When Is Life Grievable?

Author: Judith Butler

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 224

View: 267

In Frames of War, Judith Butler explores the media's portrayal of state violence, a process integral to the way in which the West wages modern war. This portrayal has saturated our understanding of human life, and has led to the exploitation and abandonment of whole peoples, who are cast as existential threats rather than as living populations in need of protection. These people are framed as already lost, to imprisonment, unemployment and starvation, and can easily be dismissed. In the twisted logic that rationalizes their deaths, the loss of such populations is deemed necessary to protect the lives of 'the living.' This disparity, Butler argues, has profound implications for why and when we feel horror, outrage, guilt, loss and righteous indifference, both in the context of war and, increasingly, everyday life. This book discerns the resistance to the frames of war in the context of the images from Abu Ghraib, the poetry from Guantanamo, recent European policy on immigration and Islam, and debates on normativity and non-violence. In this urgent response to ever more dominant methods of coercion, violence and racism, Butler calls for a re-conceptualization of the Left, one that brokers cultural difference and cultivates resistance to the illegitimate and arbitrary effects of state violence and its vicissitudes.

Thinking about and Enacting Curriculum in "frames of War"

Author: Raht Naqvi

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 163

View: 628

"Rahat Naqvi and Hans Smits' edited collection, "Thinking about and Enacting Curriculum in 'Frames of War'" is centered on the theme of how the current global order creates precarious conditions for human life. The contributors respond to the challenges Judith Butler posed about the fragility of life and questions about how we apprehend, and take up ethically, our responsibilities for those who are considered "Other." The overarching objective of the book is the meaning of a call to ethics, and how discussion of framing and frames is a provocation to think about our responsibilities as curriculum scholars and practitioners"-- Provided by publisher.

Frames of War when is Life Grievable?.

Author:

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View: 982

In Frames of War, Judith Butler explores the media's portrayal of state violence, a process integral to the way in which the West wages modern war. This portrayal has saturated our understanding of human life, and has led to the exploitation and abandonment of whole peoples, who are cast as existential threats rather than as living populations in need of protection. These people are framed as already lost, to imprisonment, unemployment and starvation, and can easily be dismissed. In the twisted logic that rationalizes their deaths, the loss of such populations is deemed necessary to protect the lives of 'the living.' This disparity, Butler argues, has profound implications for why and when we feel horror, outrage, guilt, loss and righteous indifference, both in the context of war and, increasingly, everyday life. This book discerns the resistance to the frames of war in the context of the images from Abu Ghraib, the poetry from Guantanamo, recent European policy on immigration and Islam, and debates on normativity and non-violence. In this urgent response to ever more dominant methods of coercion, violence and racism, Butler calls for a re-conceptualization of the Left, one that brokers cultural difference and cultivates resistance to the illegitimate and arbitrary effects of state violence and its vicissitudes.

Frames Of Justice

Implications For Social Policy

Author: Leroy H. Pelton

Publisher: Transaction Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 222

View: 377

This work is devoted to analyzing three major frames of justice--group justice, individual desert, and life affirmation--and their implications for social policy as well as their reflections in contemporary social policies.Pelton finds that all three frames of justice are reflected in the Bible and, later, the Koran. He contends that there is no evidence in the Bible of a genesis or development from one frame of justice to another. Rather, a sense of justice has existed in the human mind from time immemorial, with the three frames coexisting and manifesting themselves in both inter- and intra-group relations. The prominence of one frame over another at any particular point in history or in a particular geographical location is influenced by a variety of factors, though it is ultimately open to human choice. Pelton compares and contrasts the philosophies of nonviolence and liberalism in regard to the frames, and explores the relationships between principle, sentiment, reason, justice, and policy. He discusses social science's problematic relationship to justice in policymaking--for instance, how scholars have focused more on the effectiveness of policies, largely in terms of statistical outcomes reflecting aggregate data analyses, than on their justice. He goes on to explore in depth how frames of justice give direction to social policies, including those of genocide. Frames of Justice is an outstanding work that analyzes the question of justice and social policy, while simultaneously exploring the notion of desert in religion, philosophy, and legislation--especially within the context of the moral question of the relationship between means and ends--and contrasting it with the principle of life affirmation. Leroy H. Pelton is a professor in and former director of the School of Social Work, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, and professor emeritus of the School of Social Work, Salem State College, Massachusetts. He is the author of The Psychology of Nonviolence, For Reasons of Poverty: A Critical Analysis of the Public Child Welfare System in the United States, and Doing Justice: Liberalism, Group Constructs, and Individual Realities, and the editor of The Social Context of Child Abuse and Neglect. He has also written numerous journal articles on psychology, social work, child welfare, and social policy.

The Visual Politics of Wars

Author: Ibrahim Saleh

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 227

View: 390

This collection, part of a series entitled Visual Politics of War, presents some of the key approaches to war reporting and suggests trajectories for further critical research into media visualisation of conflict. Ever since the Vietnam War, media globalisation has made conflict a part of everyone’s life in the modern world. This is where war reporters play the crucial role of mediators, to bring us stories covering the various dimensions of war from some of the most vulnerable places on Earth. This volume will explore the visual culture of conflict, specifically the war on terror that is grounded in the conceptual claim that images are central to contemporary geopolitics.

Fictions of the War on Terror

Difference and the Transnational 9/11 Novel

Author: D. O'Gorman

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 217

View: 925

This book argues that there are a number of contemporary novels that challenge the reductive 'us and them' binaries that have been prevalent not only in politics and the global media since 9/11, but also in many works within the emerging genre of '9/11 fiction' itself.

The Philosophy of War Films

Author: David LaRocca

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 538

View: 188

Wars have played a momentous role in shaping the course of human history. The ever-present specter of conflict has made it an enduring topic of interest in popular culture, and many movies, from Hollywood blockbusters to independent films, have sought to show the complexities and horrors of war on-screen. In The Philosophy of War Films, David LaRocca compiles a series of essays by prominent scholars that examine the impact of representing war in film and the influence that cinematic images of battle have on human consciousness, belief, and action. The contributors explore a variety of topics, including the aesthetics of war as portrayed on-screen, the effect war has on personal identity, and the ethical problems presented by war. Drawing upon analyses of iconic and critically acclaimed war films such as Saving Private Ryan (1998), The Thin Red Line (1998), Rescue Dawn (2006), Restrepo (2010), and Zero Dark Thirty (2012), this volume's examination of the genre creates new ways of thinking about the philosophy of war. A fascinating look at the manner in which combat and its aftermath are depicted cinematically, The Philosophy of War Films is a timely and engaging read for any philosopher, filmmaker, reader, or viewer who desires a deeper understanding of war and its representation in popular culture.

Precarious Life

The Powers of Mourning and Violence

Author: Judith Butler

Publisher: Verso

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 168

View: 450

An appraisal of post-September 11 America presents the U.S. government's decision to attack Afghanistan and Iraq as a response to loss and grief, arguing that the vulnerability being experienced in the western world is posing an opportunity to imagine a global political community without violence. Reprint.

Edinburgh Companion to Twentieth-Century British and American War Literature

Author: Adam Piette

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 600

View: 113

The first reference book to deal so fully and incisively with the cultural representations of war in 20th-century English and US literature and film. The volume covers the two World Wars as well as specific conflicts that generated literary and imaginativ

Cultural Movements and Collective Memory

Christopher Columbus and the Rewriting of the National Origin Myth

Author: T. Kubal

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 261

View: 879

This book uses political process theory to examine three cultural movements around Christopher Columbus. The author examines the religious, ethnic and anti-colonial movements most successful at rewriting national origin myth, demonstrating the political process model while telling the story of how a powerless public mobilized to rewrite its past.