Fragile Diplomacy

Author: Maureen Cassidy-Geiger

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN:

Category: Antiques & Collectibles

Page: 369

View: 868

While imported Chinese porcelain had become a valuable commodity in Europe in the seventeenth century, local attempts to produce porcelain long remained unsuccessful. At last the secret of hard-paste porcelain was uncovered, and in 1710 the first European porcelain was manufactured in Saxony. Meissen porcelain, still manufactured today, soon ranked in value with silver and gold. This thorough and lavishly illustrated volume explores the early years of Meissen porcelain and how the princes of Saxony came to use highly prized porcelain pieces as diplomatic gifts for presentation to foreign courts. An eminent team of international contributors examines the trade of Meissen with other nations, from England to Russia. They also investigate the cultural ambience of the Dresden Court, varying tastes of the markets, the wide range of porcelain objects, and their designers and makers. Individual chapters are devoted to gifts to Denmark, other German courts, the Holy Roman Empire, Italy, France, and other nations. For every Meissen collector or enthusiast, this book will be not only a treasured handbook but also a source of visual delight.

Diplomacy, Development and Defense: A Paradigm for Policy Coherence

A Comparative Analysis of International Strategies

Author: Stefani Weiss

Publisher: Verlag Bertelsmann Stiftung

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 366

View: 351

The end of the Cold War radically changed both classic policies of national and collective security and international strategies for conflict management and the stabilization of precarious states. The threat of Islamic extremism and the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq have shattered any illusions of a peace dividend and have given strategies against state failure a new urgency. The growing awareness of the complex and intertwined problems of human security, socioeconomic underdevelopment and governance deficits as root causes of precarious statehood made policy coherence the new mantra for Western national governments and international organizations. Henceforth, it was envisaged to relinquish the existing division between diplomacy, development and defense in favour of the new comprehensive "3D"-approach. This book is an attempt to assess the extent to which both international organizations and states have lived up to the new insights of the "3D" continuum and adopted strategies corresponding institutional settings and policy instruments to provide the necessary culture of policy coherence for tackling the problems of precarious statehood and the international security challenges those states pose. On the national level, the cases studied are the United States, the United Kingdom, Germany and the Netherlands. On the international level, the United Nations and the European Union were examined. It is hoped, that the lessons learned from whole-of-government approaches and the recommendations drawn from this survey will help both governments and international organizations to excel in dealing with precarious states, thereby making policy coherence a reality in risk assessment, decision-making and policy implementation.

Fragile Diplomacy

Meissen Porcelain for European Courts Ca. 1710-63

Author: Maureen Cassidy-Geiger

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 369

View: 920

The Failure of Economic Diplomacy

Britain, Germany, France and the United States, 1931-36

Author: P. Clavin

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 279

View: 895

Based on new archival research, this is the first comprehensive study of the failure of international co-operation to combat the Great Depression. The book explores the impact of protectionism, reparations and war debts, as well as the more well known disagreements on monetary issues which, together, helped to prolong the most profound economic depression of the twentieth century. The economic and diplomatic lessons drawn from this period by the major powers - particularly German intelligence as to the deep divisions in Anglo-American economic relations - also provide an important contribution to understanding the origins of the Second World War and the diplomatic and economic order created in its aftermath.

Emanuel Swedenborg, Secret Agent on Earth and in Heaven

Jacobites, Jews and Freemasons in Early Modern Sweden

Author: Marsha Keith Schuchard

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 824

View: 371

Drawing on unpublished diplomatic and Masonic archives, this study reveals the career of Emanuel Swedenborg as a secret intelligence agent for Louis XV and the pro-French, pro-Jacobite party of “Hats” in Sweden. Utilizing Kabbalistic meditation techniques, he sought political intelligence on earth and in heaven.

Contemporary Concert Diplomacy

A New Mechanism for Great Power Crisis Management in the Post-Cold War World

Author: Jung Karsten

Publisher: Tectum Wissenschaftsverlag

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 856

View: 870

Two centuries after the Congress of Vienna formed the 'Concert of Europe', the great powers of the world once again assembled in Austria's capital in June 2015: This time they were negotiating an end to the nuclear standoff with Iran. These so-called EU-3+3 negotiations signify a broader trend: From Iran to North Korea, from the former Yugoslavia to Israel and Palestine, the great powers increasingly opt for exclusive and informal ad hoc formats in crisis management. Though lacking in aristocratic grandeur and festive surroundings, these context-specific, self-selected forums for policy-coordination in many ways resemble the nineteenth-century 'Concert of Europe'. Why do the key actors in the contemporary international system consciously shun the standards of accountability and legitimacy represented by the post-war liberal institutional order? Why are they in favor of a more casual form of diplomacy that is not constrained by an inclusive membership, strict rules of procedure, and modern standards of transparency? This study rationalizes the popularity and assesses the viability of Contemporary Concert Diplomacy as a means for crisis management in the post-Cold War world. Drawing on a system-level analysis as well as four extensive case studies (the Yugoslavia Contact Group, the Middle East Quartet, the Six Party Talks with North Korea, and the EU-3+3 negotiations with Iran), it examines and explains the emergence, operation, and outcomes of Contemporary Concert Diplomacy. In doing so, it sheds light on a highly significant – but vastly understudied – instrument of crisis management. It thus proves valuable to both, the student and practitioner of international affairs.

Re-inventing Ovid’s Metamorphoses

Pictorial and Literary Transformations in Various Media, 1400–1800

Author: Karl A.E. Enenkel

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 504

View: 511

This volume explores early modern recreations of Ovid’s Metamorphoses, focusing on the creative ingenium of artists and writers who freely handled the original text so as to adapt it to different artistic media and genres.

Gender and Political Culture in Early Modern Europe, 1400-1800

Author: James Daybell

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 258

View: 418

Gender and Political Culture in Early Modern Europe investigates the gendered nature of political culture across early modern Europe by exploring the relationship between gender, power, and political authority and influence. This collection offers a rethinking of what constituted ‘politics’ and a reconsideration of how men and women operated as part of political culture. It demonstrates how underlying structures could enable or constrain political action, and how political power and influence could be exercised through social and cultural practices. The book is divided into four parts - diplomacy, gifts and the politics of exchange; socio-economic structures; gendered politics at court; and voting and political representations – each of which looks at a series of interrelated themes exploring the ways in which political culture is inflected by questions of gender. In addition to examples drawn from across Europe, including Austria, the Dutch Republic, the Italian States and Scandinavia, the volume also takes a transnational comparative approach, crossing national borders, while the concluding chapter, by Merry Wiesner-Hanks, offers a global perspective on the field and encourages comparative analysis both chronologically and geographically. As the first collection to draw together early modern gender and political culture, this book is the perfect starting point for students exploring this fascinating topic.

FDR's Ambassadors and the Diplomacy of Crisis

From the Rise of Hitler to the End of World War II

Author: David Mayers

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page:

View: 482

What effect did personality and circumstance have on US foreign policy during World War II? This incisive account of US envoys residing in the major belligerent countries – Japan, Germany, Italy, China, France, Great Britain, USSR – highlights the fascinating role played by such diplomats as Joseph Grew, William Dodd, William Bullitt, Joseph Kennedy and W. Averell Harriman. Between Hitler's 1933 ascent to power and the 1945 bombing of Nagasaki, US ambassadors sculpted formal policy – occasionally deliberately, other times inadvertently – giving shape and meaning not always intended by Franklin D. Roosevelt or predicted by his principal advisors. From appeasement to the Holocaust and the onset of the Cold War, David Mayers examines the complicated interaction between policy, as conceived in Washington, and implementation on the ground in Europe and Asia. By so doing, he also sheds needed light on the fragility, ambiguities and enduring urgency of diplomacy and its crucial function in international politics.

Ceramics and Modernity in Japan

Author: Meghen Jones

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 230

View: 200

Ceramics and Modernity in Japan offers a set of critical perspectives on the creation, patronage, circulation, and preservation of ceramics during Japan’s most dramatic period of modernization, the 1860s to 1960s. As in other parts of the world, ceramics in modern Japan developed along the three ontological trajectories of art, craft, and design. Yet, it is widely believed that no other modern nation was engaged with ceramics as much as Japan—a "potter’s paradise"—in terms of creation, exhibition, and discourse. This book explores how Japanese ceramics came to achieve such a status and why they were such significant forms of cultural production. Its medium-specific focus encourages examination of issues regarding materials and practices unique to ceramics, including their distinct role throughout Japanese cultural history. Going beyond descriptive historical treatments of ceramics as the products of individuals or particular styles, the closely intertwined chapters also probe the relationship between ceramics and modernity, including the ways in which ceramics in Japan were related to their counterparts in Asia and Europe. Featuring contributions by leading international specialists, this book will be useful to students and scholars of art history, design, and Japanese studies.