Foundations of Anglican Evangelicalism in Victoria

Four Elements for Continuity, 1847-1937

Author: Wei-Han Kuan

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 302

View: 123

For more than half a century, the Anglican Diocese of Melbourne was unquestionably the most rigorously evangelical and missions-oriented diocese in Australia. The Diocese of Sydney, in that same period, was decidedly broader in theological and liturgical practice. How and why did Melbourne move in one direction, while Sydney in the other? This study suggests that the answers are to be found in four vital contributors: local churches, evangelical societies, theological colleges, and diocesan bishops. For three broad periods of history between 1847 and 1937, the presence of these four contributors is uncovered, described, and evaluated for the Diocese of Melbourne. Evangelical activism, theological reflection, and leadership are each shown in their contemporary contexts to help us understand how people with gospel passion sought to respond faithfully to their times. This is the question of vision, leadership, and strategy at the heart of this study: “What makes for long-term evangelical continuity over a hundred-year period?”

Foundations of Anglican Evangelicalism in Victoria

Four Elements for Continuity, 1847–1937

Author: Wei-Han Kuan

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 302

View: 266

For more than half a century, the Anglican Diocese of Melbourne was unquestionably the most rigorously evangelical and missions-oriented diocese in Australia. The Diocese of Sydney, in that same period, was decidedly broader in theological and liturgical practice. How and why did Melbourne move in one direction, while Sydney in the other? This study suggests that the answers are to be found in four vital contributors: local churches, evangelical societies, theological colleges, and diocesan bishops. For three broad periods of history between 1847 and 1937, the presence of these four contributors is uncovered, described, and evaluated for the Diocese of Melbourne. Evangelical activism, theological reflection, and leadership are each shown in their contemporary contexts to help us understand how people with gospel passion sought to respond faithfully to their times. This is the question of vision, leadership, and strategy at the heart of this study: "What makes for long-term evangelical continuity over a hundred-year period?"

Evangelicals and Science

Author: Michael B. Roberts

Publisher: Greenwood

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 303

View: 866

Portrays the relationship between evangelical Christians and science.

The Call to Seriousness

The Evangelical Impact on the Victorians

Author: Ian C. Bradley

Publisher: Jonathan Cape

ISBN:

Category: England

Page: 224

View: 379

The Character of Evangelism in Colonial Melbourne

Activism, Initiative, and Leadership

Author: Darrell Neil Paproth

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Christianity

Page: 228

View: 784

"Chapter 1 sets the context by pointing out two contradictory contentions about the Christian history of C olonial Melbourne: the contention that Christianity has been of minimal or no significance; the tradition that Christianity is of fundamental importance to the history, and the civilisation of Melbourne. This thesis highlights a significant part of the tradition: evangelism. -- The second chapter, states the thesis: the Character of Evangelism in Colonial Melbourne was distinguished by (1) activism; the evangelicals were energetic and intentional. (2) It lacked nothing in initiative. (3) Both of these characteristics were due to outstanding leadership among the evangelical men of Melbourne who earnestly longed for, worked for, and saw, revival. The chapters that follow argue this by focusing on key individuals and events that were the evangelistic responses to the perceived challenges of the age. -- The Port Phillip Era (1835-1850) saw the Religious Foundations of Colonial Melbourne laid. The faith of the early men of Melbourne - orthodox, creedal and theist - was foundational to the nascent civilisation. Evangelism, mainly by the Methodists, was present from the beginning. -- The 1850s, the gold rush years, saw much evangelism, mainly by the Methodists. The Melbourne City Mission, which combined evangelistic fervour and social care, was founded. The world-wide 1858-60 revival was felt in Melbourne. The independent evangelist Henry Varley is introduced. -- The 1860s was a decade of continued enthusiasm. The other churches pulled their weight, but the Methodists continued in the van. -- The 1870s was a decade of initiative. The Anglican Hussey Burgh Macartney engaged in and facilitated evangelism and overseas missions, introduced the deeper-life movement to mainland Australia, and began The Missionary at Home and Abroad. The Methodist W H Fitchett began the Southern Cross. Henry Varley returned, and the Melbourne United Evangelistic Association was formed. -- Evangelism flourished in the 'Marvellous Melbourne' Decade (the 1880s), highlighted by the Evangelisation Society of Victoria, the 1888 Centennial Mission, and Varley's third visit. -- The crowning moments of 1890-1903 were the Rev John MacNeil and the (prayer) Band, the visit of Hudson Taylor, the Rev George Grubb and the Geelong Convention, the 1902 Torrey-Alexander Mission, and the 1903 visit of John R Mott. -- The concluding chapter summarizes the argument under the heads: the religious culture of Melbourne, the evangelical men of Melbourne, the evangelists, their methods, and their motivation." -- summary.

Evangelical Anglicans in a Revolutionary Age, 1789-1901

Author: Nigel Scotland

Publisher: Paternoster Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 457

View: 621

The nineteenth century has often been termed a "revolutionary age" on account of the rapid and radical changes which took place in industry and transport, housing and public health, science and technology, education and social life. Religion also played an important part in this revolutionary age. In particular evangelical Christianity shaped the Victorian years. From Parliament where they were represented by William Wilberforce, the Clapham Sect, Lord Shaftesbury and an increasing number of bishops, right down to the poor on whose behalf they campaigned unceasingly, evangelicals began to influence every level of society.Despite the significance of this age for evangelical Anglicans, surprisingly little has been written. Evangelical Anglicans in a Revolutionary Age seeks to restore the balance. Based on a wide range of primary sources—sermons, tracts, private correspondence, newspapers, and journals—Nigel Scotland presents an extensive study of life in this era. Evangelical Anglicans and social action, theology, education, culture, politics, and mission are dealt with. Particular attention is also given to prominent individuals such as Charles Simeon, John Sumner, Spencer Perceval, and Josephine Butler in this extensive study that celebrates the rising number of Evangelical Anglicans in the revolutionary age.

The Foundation 1000, 2002-2003

In-Depth Profiles of the 1000 Largest U.S. Foundations

Author: Foundation Center

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Reference

Page: 2848

View: 197