Between Woman and Nation

Nationalisms, Transnational Feminisms, and the State

Author: etc.

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 407

View: 898

An examination of nationalism and gender.

No Nation for Women

Ground Reportage on Rape from the World's Largest Democracy

Author: Priyanka Dubey

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 320

View: 219

Numbers convey, in part, why India is referred to as one of the world's rape capitals--one woman is raped every fifteen minutes; and in fifty years, there has been a staggering rise of 873 per cent in sexual crimes against girls. Yet numbers reveal only a part of the truth. Beyond statistics, there are stories, often unreported--of women in Damoh, Madhya Pradesh, who are routinely raped if they spurn the advances of men; of girls from de-notified tribes in Central India who have no recourse to justice if sexually violated; of victimized lower-caste girls in small-town Baduan, Uttar Pradesh. There are also stories of custodial rape, non-consensual incest and trafficking. Priyanka Dubey travels through large swathes of India, over a period of six years, to uncover the accounts of disenfranchised women who are caught in the grip of patriarchy. Equally, she asks if after the globally-reported December 2012 gang-rape of Nirbhaya in New Delhi, India's gender narrative has shifted--and if it hasn't, what needs to be done to make this a nation worthy of its intrepid girls.

No Nation for Women

Reportage on Rape from India, the World's Largest Democracy

Author: Priyanka Dubey

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 320

View: 768

No Nation for Women takes a hard, close look at what makes India unsafe for its women — from custodial rapes and honour killings to rapes of minors and trafficking — the author uncovers many unpalatable truths behind what we are familiar with as newspaper headlines only... Numbers convey, in part, why India is referred to as one of the world’s rape capitals — one woman is raped every 15 minutes; and, in 50 years, there has been a staggering rise of 873 per cent in sexual crimes against girls. And beyond the numbers and statistics, there are stories, often unreported — of women in Damoh, Madhya Pradesh, who are routinely raped if they spurn the advances of men; of girls from de-notified tribes in central India who have no recourse to justice if sexually violated; of victimized lower-caste girls in small-town Baduan, Uttar Pradesh; of frequent dislocation faced by survivor families in West Bengal; of political wrath turning into rape in Tripura. Priyanka Dubey travels through large swathes of India, over a period of six years, to uncover the accounts of disenfranchised women who are caught in the grip of patriarchy and violence. She asks if, after the globally reported December 2012 gang-rape of ‘Nirbhaya’ in New Delhi, India’s gender narrative has shifted — and, if it hasn’t, what needs to be done to make this a nation worthy of its women.

Women of the Nation

Author: Jamillah Ashira Karim

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN:

Category: HISTORY

Page: 276

View: 905

With vocal public figures such as Malcolm X, Elijah Muhammad, and Louis Farrakhan, the Nation of Islam often appears to be a male-centric religious movement, and over 60 years of scholarship have perpetuated that notion. Yet, women have been pivotal in the NOI's development, playing a major role in creating the public image that made it appealing and captivating. Women of the Nation draws on oral histories and interviews with approximately 100 women across several cities to provide an overview of women's historical contributions and their varied experiences of the NOI, including both its continuing community under Farrakhan and its offshoot into Sunni Islam under Imam W.D. Mohammed. The authors examine how women have interpreted and navigated the NOI's gender ideologies and practices, illuminating the experiences of African-American, Latina, and Native American women within the NOI and their changing roles within this patriarchal movement. The book argues that the Nation of Islam experience for women has been characterized by an expression of Islam sensitive to American cultural messages about race and gender, but also by gender and race ideals in the Islamic tradition. It offers the first exhaustive study of womenOCOs experiences in both the NOI and the W.D. Mohammed community."

The Promise of Patriarchy

Women and the Nation of Islam

Author: Ula Yvette Taylor

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

View: 466

The patriarchal structure of the Nation of Islam (NOI) promised black women the prospect of finding a provider and a protector among the organization's men, who were fiercely committed to these masculine roles. Black women's experience in the NOI, however, has largely remained on the periphery of scholarship. Here, Ula Taylor documents their struggle to escape the devaluation of black womanhood while also clinging to the empowering promises of patriarchy. Taylor shows how, despite being relegated to a lifestyle that did not encourage working outside of the home, NOI women found freedom in being able to bypass the degrading experiences connected to labor performed largely by working-class black women and in raising and educating their children in racially affirming environments. Telling the stories of women like Clara Poole (wife of Elijah Muhammad) and Burnsteen Sharrieff (secretary to W. D. Fard, founder of the Allah Temple of Islam), Taylor offers a compelling narrative that explains how their decision to join a homegrown, male-controlled Islamic movement was a complicated act of self-preservation and self-love in Jim Crow America.

En-Gendering India

Woman and Nation in Colonial and Postcolonial Narratives

Author: Sangeeta Ray

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 198

View: 967

DIVExplores the relation of gender and nation in postcolonial writing about India./div

Mothers of the Nation

Women's Political Writing in England, 1780-1830

Author: Anne Kostelanetz Mellor

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 172

View: 790

Mellor contests the notion that women occupied a separate private sphere in England during the Romantic Era. Instead, women writers participated in the public sphere, shaping public opinion & promoting a new concept of British national identity.

Women and the Irish Nation

Gender, Culture and Irish Identity, 1890-1914

Author: J. MacPherson

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 214

View: 132

At the turn of the twentieth century women played a key role in debates about the nature of the Irish nation. Examining women's participation in nationalist and rural reform groups, this book is an important contribution to our understanding of Irish identity in the prelude to revolution and how it was shaped by women.

Aristocratic Women and the Literary Nation, 1832-1867

Author: M. O'Cinneide

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 241

View: 549

Aristocratic women flourished in the Victorian literary world, their combination of class privilege and gendered exclusion generating distinctively socialized modes of participation in cultural and political activity. Their writing offers an important trope through which to consider the nature of political, private and public spheres.

The Women's Movement in Postcolonial Indonesia

Gender and Nation in a New Democracy

Author: Elizabeth Martyn

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 280

View: 754

This book examines women's activism in the early years of independent Indonesia when new attitudes to gender, nationalism, citizenship and democratization were forming. It questions the meaning of democratization for women and their relationship to national sovereignty within the new Indonesian state, and discusses women's organizations and their activities; women's social and economic roles; and the different cultural, regional and ethnic attitudes towards women, while showing the failure of political change to fully address women's gender interests and needs. The author argues that both the role of nationalism in defining gender identity and the role of gender in defining national identity need equal recognition.

The Great Upheaval

Women and Nation in Postwar Nigeria

Author: Judith A. Byfield

Publisher: New African Histories

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 276

View: 266

Description forthcoming.

Women of the Nation

Between Black Protest and Sunni Islam

Author: Dawn-Marie Gibson

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

View: 554

With vocal public figures such as Malcolm X, Elijah Muhammad, and Louis Farrakhan, the Nation of Islam often appears to be a male-centric religious movement, and over 60 years of scholarship have perpetuated that notion. Yet, women have been pivotal in the NOI's development, playing a major role in creating the public image that made it appealing and captivating. Women of the Nation draws on oral histories and interviews with approximately 100 women across several cities to provide an overview of women's historical contributions and their varied experiences of the NOI, including both its continuing community under Farrakhan and its offshoot into Sunni Islam under Imam W.D. Mohammed. The authors examine how women have interpreted and navigated the NOI's gender ideologies and practices, illuminating the experiences of African-American, Latina, and Native American women within the NOI and their changing roles within this patriarchal movement. The book argues that the Nation of Islam experience for women has been characterized by an expression of Islam sensitive to American cultural messages about race and gender, but also by gender and race ideals in the Islamic tradition. It offers the first exhaustive study of women’s experiences in both the NOI and the W.D. Mohammed community.

Visualizing the Nation

Gender, Representation, and Revolution in Eighteenth-Century France

Author: Joan B. Landes

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 478

Popular images of women were everywhere in revolutionary France. Although women's political participation was curtailed, female allegories of liberty, justice, and the republic played a crucial role in the passage from old regime to modern society. In her lavishly illustrated and gracefully written book, Joan B. Landes explores this paradox within the workings of revolutionary visual culture and traces the interaction between pictorial and textual political arguments. Landes highlights the widespread circulation of images of the female body, notwithstanding the political leadership's suspicions of the dangers of feminine influence and the seductions of visual imagery. The use of caricatures and allegories contributed to the destruction of the masculinized images of hierarchic absolutism and to forging new roles for men and women in both the intimate and public arenas. Landes tells the fascinating story of how the depiction of the nation as a desirable female body worked to eroticize patriotism and to bind male subjects to the nation-state. Despite their political subordination, women too were invited to identify with the project of nationalism. Recent views of the French Revolution have emphasized linguistic concerns; in contrast, Landes stresses the role of visual cognition in fashioning ideas of nationalism and citizenship. Her book demonstrates as well that the image is often a site of contestation, as individual viewers may respond to it in unexpected, even subversive, ways.

Twentieth-century Fiction by Irish Women

Nation and Gender

Author: Heather Ingman

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 200

View: 806

Heather Ingman's study argues that reading twentieth-century Irish women's fiction in the light of Kristeva's theories of nationhood places Irish women at the heart of writing about the nation and demonstrates that the political dimension of their fiction has often been underestimated. Her book is an important contribution to the study of gender in Irish writing that changes the way we view Irish women's writing.

Gender and Nation

SAGE Publications

Author: Nira Yuval-Davis

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 168

View: 487

Nira Yuval-Davis provides an authoritative overview and critique of writings on gender and nationhood, presenting an original analysis of the ways gender relations affect and are affected by national projects and processes. In Gender and Nation Yuval-Davis argues that the construction of nationhood involves specific notions of both `manhood' and `womanhood'. She examines the contribution of gender relations to key dimensions of nationalist projects - the nation's reproduction, its culture and citizenship - as well as to national conflicts and wars, exploring the contesting relations between feminism and nationalism. Gender and Nation is an important contribution to the debates on citizenship, gender and nationhood. It will be essential reading for academics and students of women's studies, race and ethnic studies, sociology and political science.

For Women and the Nation

Funmilayo Ransome-Kuti of Nigeria

Author: Cheryl Johnson-Odim

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 198

View: 501

Funmilayo Ransome-Kuti was a Nigerian activist who fought for suffrage and equal rights for her countrywomen long before the second wave of the women's movement in the United States. Her involvement in international women's organizations led her to travel the world in the period following World War II. She championed the causes of the poor and downtrodden of both sexes as she joined the anticolonial movement struggling for Nigeria's independence. For Women and the Nation is the story of this courageous woman. One of a handful of full-length biographies of African women, let alone of African women activists, it will be welcomed by students of women's studies, African history, and biography, as well as by those interested in exploring the historical background of Nigeria.

Sex, Gender, and the Politics of ERA

A State and the Nation

Author: Donald G. Mathews

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 257

Sex, Gender, and the Politics of ERA is the most profound and sensitive discussion to date of the way in which women responded to feminism. Drawing on extensive research and interviews, Mathews and De Hart explore the fate of the ERA in North Carolina--one of the three states targeted by both sides as essential to ratification--to reveal the dynamics that stunned supporters across America. The authors insightfully link public discourse and private feelings, placing arguments used throughout the nation in the personal contexts of women who pleaded their cases for and against equality. Beginning with a study of woman suffrage, the book shows how issues of sex, gender, race, and power remained potent weapons on the ERA battlefield. The ideas of such vocal opponents as Phyllis Schlafly and Senator Sam Ervin set the perfect stage for mothers to confess their terror at the violation of their daughters in a post-ERA world, while the prospect of losing ratification to this terror impelled supporters to shed the white gloves of genteel lobbying for the combat boots of political in-fighting. In the end, the efforts of ERA supporters could neither outweigh the symbolic actions of its opponents nor weaken the resistance of those same legislators to further federal guarantees of equality. Ultimately, opponents succeeded in making equality for women seem dangerous. In thus explaining the ERA controversy, the authors brilliantly illuminate the many meanings of feminism for the American people.

Lebanese Women at the Crossroads

Caught Between Sect and Nation

Author: Nelia Hyndman-Rizk

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 166

View: 718

Thirty years after the end of the civil war, Lebanese women are still struggling for gender equality. This study builds on recent scholarship on women's activism in the Arab world, in the context of the Arab Spring. It examines how discourses of secularism and equal civil rights have informed the contemporary Lebanese women's movement in their campaigns for a domestic violence law, women's nationality rights, a women's quota in parliament, the reform of personal status law and the recognition of civil marriage. This book argues that women are caught between sect and nation, due to Lebanon's plural legal system, which makes a division between religious and civil law. While both jurisdictions allocate women relational rights, guided by the logic of patrilineal descent, women's inequality is central to the reproduction of sectarian difference and patriarchal control within the confessional political system, as a whole.

All the Single Ladies

Unmarried Women and the Rise of an Independent Nation

Author: Rebecca Traister

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 339

View: 662

"Today, only twenty percent of Americans are wed by age twenty-nine, compared to nearly sixty percent in 1960. The Population Reference Bureau calls it a 'dramatic reversal.' [This book presents a] portrait of contemporary American life and how we got here, through the lens of the single American woman, covering class, race, [and] sexual orientation, and filled with ... anecdotes from ... contemporary and historical figures"--