For the Thrill of It

Leopold, Loeb, and the Murder That Shocked Jazz Age Chicago

Author: Simon Baatz

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 560

View: 539

It was a crime that shocked the nation: the brutal murder in Chicago in 1924 of a child by two wealthy college students who killed solely for the thrill of the experience. Nathan Leopold and Richard Loeb were intellectuals—too smart, they believed, for the police to catch them. When they were apprehended, state's attorney Robert Crowe was certain that no defense could save the ruthless killers from the gallows. But the families of the confessed murderers hired Clarence Darrow, entrusting the lives of their sons to the most famous lawyer in America in what would be one of the most sensational criminal trials in the history of American justice. Set against the backdrop of the 1920s—a time of prosperity, self-indulgence, and hedonistic excess in a lawless city on the brink of anarchy—For the Thrill of It draws the reader into a world of speakeasies and flappers, of gangsters and gin parties, with a spellbinding narrative of Jazz Age murder and mystery.

Life Stories

Exploring Issues in Educational History Through Biography

Author: Linda C. Morice

Publisher: IAP

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 291

View: 720

Life Stories: Exploring Issues in Educational History Through Biography consists of 13 essays, each of which offers perspective on one of four key questions that have long drawn scholarly attention: What should schools teach? Who gets to decide? How should educators adapt to a changing world to provide opportunity for all students? How should educators’ experiences be interpreted for future audiences? The book is written to commemorate the thirtieth anniversary of the International Society for Educational Biography and its journal, Vitae Scholasticae. All of the essays have appeared in the journal, and they are set in a variety of educational environments that span 174 years. Taken together, the essays demonstrate the important contributions that biography can make to educational history. Life Stories would be of interest to educational biographers and historians for use in their own scholarly work. Instructors might also consider assigning Life Stories as a required text in educational history courses.

American Jewry

A New History

Author: Eli Lederhendler

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page:

View: 532

Understanding the history of Jews in America requires a synthesis of over 350 years of documents, social data, literature and journalism, architecture, oratory, and debate, and each time that history is observed, new questions are raised and new perspectives found. This book presents a readable account of that history, with an emphasis on migration patterns, social and religious life, and political and economic affairs. It explains the long-range development of American Jewry as the product of 'many new beginnings' more than a direct evolution leading from early colonial experiments to latter-day social patterns. This book also shows that not all of American Jewish history has occurred on American soil, arguing that Jews, more than most other Americans, persist in assigning crucial importance to international issues. This approach provides a fresh perspective that can open up the practice of minority-history writing, so that the very concepts of minority and majority should not be taken for granted.

Ugly Prey

An Innocent Woman and the Death Sentence That Scandalized Jazz Age Chicago

Author: Emilie Le Beau Lucchesi

Publisher: Chicago Review Press

ISBN:

Category: True Crime

Page: 336

View: 666

Ugly Prey tells the riveting story of poor Italian immigrant Sabella Nitti, the first woman ever sentenced to hang in Chicago, in 1923, for the alleged murder of her husband. Journalist Emilie Le Beau Lucchesi leads readers through the case, showing how, with no evidence and no witnesses, Nitti was the target of an obsessed deputy sheriff and the victim of a faulty legal system. She was also—to the men who convicted her and reporters fixated on her—ugly. For that unforgiveable crime, the media painted her as a hideous, dirty, and unpredictable immigrant, almost an animal. Featuring two other fascinating women—the ambitious and ruthless journalist who helped demonize Sabella through her reports and the brilliant, beautiful, 23-year-old lawyer who helped humanize her with a jailhouse makeover—Ugly Prey is not just a page-turning courtroom drama but also a thought-provoking look at the intersection of gender, ethnicity, and class within the American justice system.

Jewish American Chronology: Chronologies of the American Mosaic

Chronologies of the American Mosaic

Author: Mark K. Bauman

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 155

View: 178

This comprehensive and analytical history of American Jews and Judaism from the Colonial Era to the present explores the impact of America on Jews and of Jews on America. • Hundreds of entries, organized chronologically, explain and analyze America's impact on Judaism and Jews, and Jews' impact on America • Photographs of individuals, businesses, synagogues, and orphans' homes, striking workers, suffragettes, and statuary with explanatory labels • Dozens of glossary entries that define and clarify key terms from "anti-Semitism" to "Zionism," as well as historical jargon like "colonial charters" and "established churches" • A select bibliography of books, journals, and web pages guides the reader in further study

The Girl on the Velvet Swing

Sex, Murder, and Madness at the Dawn of the Twentieth Century

Author: Simon Baatz

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN:

Category: True Crime

Page: 400

View: 220

From New York Times bestselling author Simon Baatz, the first comprehensive account of the murder that shocked the world. In 1901 Evelyn Nesbit, a chorus girl in the musical Florodora, dined alone with the architect Stanford White in his townhouse on 24th Street in New York. Nesbit, just sixteen years old, had recently moved to the city. White was forty-seven and a principal in the prominent architectural firm McKim, Mead & White. As the foremost architect of his day, he was a celebrity, responsible for designing countless landmark buildings in Manhattan. That evening, after drinking champagne, Nesbit lost consciousness and awoke to find herself naked in bed with White. Telltale spots of blood on the bed sheets told her that White had raped her. She told no one about the rape until, several years later, she confided in Harry Thaw, the millionaire playboy who would later become her husband. Thaw, thirsting for revenge, shot and killed White in 1906 before hundreds of theatergoers during a performance in Madison Square Garden, a building that White had designed. The trial was a sensation that gripped the nation. Most Americans agreed with Thaw that he had been justified in killing White, but the district attorney expected to send him to the electric chair. Evelyn Nesbit's testimony was so explicit and shocking that Theodore Roosevelt himself called on the newspapers not to print it verbatim. The murder of White cast a long shadow: Harry Thaw later attempted suicide, and Evelyn Nesbit struggled for many years to escape an addiction to cocaine. The Girl on the Velvet Swing, a tale of glamour, excess, and danger, is an immersive, fascinating look at an America dominated by men of outsize fortunes and by the women who were their victims.