Food Justice in US and Global Contexts

Bringing Theory and Practice Together

Author: Ian Werkheiser

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 319

View: 488

This book offers fresh perspectives on issues of food justice. The chapters emerged from a series of annual workshops on food justice held at Michigan State University between 2013 and 2015, which brought together a wide variety of interested people to learn from and work with each other. Food justice can be studied from such diverse perspectives as philosophy, anthropology, economics, gender and sexuality studies, geography, history, literary criticism, philosophy and sociology as well as the human dimensions of agricultural and environmental sciences. As such, interdisciplinary workshops are a much-needed vehicle to improve our understanding of the subject, which is at the center of a vibrant and growing discourse not only among academics from a wide range of disciplines but also among policy makers and community activists. The book includes their perspectives, offering a wide range of approaches to and conceptions of food justice in a variety of contexts. This invaluable work requires readers to cross boundaries and be open to new ideas based on different assumptions.

Consumer Perception of Food Attributes

Consumer Perception of Food Attributes

Author: Shigeru Matsumoto

Publisher: CRC Press

ISBN:

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 298

View: 806

Food credence attributes are food features that are difficult to verify even after consumption. Consumers, today, are concerned about many food credence attributes, including animal rights, contamination risk, fair trade practice, genetic modification, geographical origin, and organic farming. For the past several decades, many scholars have analyzed the value consumers place on credence attributes and have reported that consumers will pay a premium for foods with these desirable properties. In addition, their studies reveal that individual consumers place greater importance on some credence attributes than others. For example, some are seriously concerned about animal welfare, while others are solely concerned about food safety. One of the objectives of this book is to summarize recent empirical findings from scholarly works on how consumers value food credence attributes. Such knowledge would benefit producers, processors, retailers, and policy makers. Another objective of this book is to discuss the effectiveness of the programs that have been introduced to strengthen the relationship between producers and consumers. Many programs have been developed to more effectively inform consumers regarding food production processes.

Social Work in a Global Context

Issues and Challenges

Author: George Palattiyil

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 332

View: 528

Social Work in a Global Context engages with, and critically explores, key issues that inform social work practice around the world. Social work can take many forms, and is differently understood in different parts of the world. However, at base, it can be seen as a profession which strives to advance the causes of the vulnerable and marginalised with the aim of promoting social justice, equality, and human rights. This text provides examples of social work in a wide range of countries, informing our understanding of what social work is. It looks at how practice changes or stays the same, and at the impact of policy, as experienced by service users as well as by practitioners working in challenging circumstances. It also meaningfully reflects on the strengths and challenges that are enabled by diversity. Divided into four parts, this wide-ranging text discusses: - what social work means in four different countries -some examples of the impact social and political context can have on social work practice - how social workers see and work with the vulnerable - the future for social work, from disaster work to involving service users. Social Work in a Global Context is the first truly international book for all those interested in comparative and cross-cultural understandings of social work.

International Environmental Law and the Global South

Author: Shawkat Alam

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page:

View: 823

The unprecedented degradation of the planet's vital ecosystems is among the most pressing issues confronting the international community. Despite the proliferation of legal instruments to combat environmental problems, conflicts between rich and poor nations (the North-South divide) have compromised international environmental law, leading to deadlocks in environmental treaty negotiations and noncompliance with existing agreements. This volume examines both the historical origins of the North-South divide in European colonialism as well as its contemporary manifestations in a range of issues including food justice, energy justice, indigenous rights, trade, investment, extractive industries, human rights, land grabs, hazardous waste, and climate change. Born out of the recognition that global inequality and profligate consumerism present threats to a sustainable planet, this book makes a unique contribution to international environmental law by emphasizing the priorities and perspectives of the global South.

Routledge International Handbook of Green Criminology

Author: Nigel South

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 700

View: 281

The Routledge International Handbook of Green Criminology was the first comprehensive and international anthology dedicated to green criminology. It presented green criminology to an international audience, described the state of the field, offered a description of a range of environmental issues of regional and global importance, and argued for continued criminological attention to environmental crimes and harms, setting an agenda for further study. In the six years since its publication, the field has continued to grow and thrive. This revised and expanded second edition of the Handbook reflects new methodological orientations, new locations of study such as Asia, Canada and South America, and new responses to environmental harms. While a number of the original chapters have been revised, the second edition offers a range of fresh chapters covering new and emerging areas of study, such as: conservation criminology, eco-feminism, environmental victimology, fracking, migration and eco-rights, and e-waste. This handbook continues to define and capture the field of green criminology and is essential reading for students and researchers engaged in green crime and environmental harm.

Water, Governance, and Crime Issues

Author: Katja Eman

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 245

View: 914

This book provides an overview of crimes involving water, including pollution, illegal dumping, and supply chain disruption from a criminological perspective. It examines a multifaceted issue from a comparative policy perspective supplemented with individual case studies to provide insights on the magnitude of the problem as well as possible solutions and policy recommendations. As growing populations and economic sectors continue to put unprecedented pressures on water supplies, the book aims to contribute to a better understanding of the problem in order to ensure the sustainability, long-term viability, and equitable use of this essential resource. The first part of the volume examines criminological and policy perspectives, including an overview of regulatory approaches, privatization of water resources, and the scope of the criminal problem in this area. The second part presents informative case studies from a variety of different regional and social contexts. Finally, the editors present an outlook in policy and enforcement improvements. This work will be of interest to researchers in criminology, criminal justice, public policy, and comparative law, as well as those studying environmental regulations and sustainability. Water, Governance and Crime Issues is a much needed addition to the growing original contributions of green criminology. This volume captures the complex landscape of water crimes, including the numerous disparities and inequalities of there being too much water in some places and too little in others amongst the many complexities. The edited collection also covers conceptual issues (i.e. water as a human right) as well as practical hurdles (i.e. the challenges in keeping statistics on offences) and real world examples. Many of the chapters are likely to introduce readers to new issues and the interplay with a myriad of traditional problems – corruption, organised crime, privatisation, and terrorism. I agree with the editors and authors that water crime issues deserve further scientific study and this provides a solid starting point. -Dr. Tanya Wyatt, University of Northumbria Population growth and urbanization, more frequent droughts due to climate change, the privatization of and unequal access to water resources and increasing water pollution are just some of the contemporary and future challenges relating to water crimes. Water, Governance and Crime Issues speaks to the scientific relevance of water for (green) criminology as well as the policy implications of water crimes. Several of the cases in this edited book refer to countries and regions we do not usually hear about and yet are perfect illustrations of the challenges faced in governing and studying water crimes. -Dr. Lieselot Bisschop, Erasmus School of Law

Ethics in Practice

An Anthology

Author: Hugh LaFollette

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 760

View: 285

The bestselling and field-defining textbook which has introduced generations of students to the field of practical ethics, now in a new fully-revised fifth edition For more than twenty years, Ethics in Practice has paved the way for students to confront the difficult ethical questions they will, must, or do already face. Accessible to introductory students yet sufficiently rigorous for those pursuing advanced study, this celebrated collection encourages and guides readers to explore ethical dimensions of important, controversial topics such as euthanasia, environmental action, economic injustice, discrimination, incarceration, abortion, and torture. In combining new and revised modern texts with works of classic scholarship, Ethics in Practice equips readers to consider wide-ranging ideas in practical ethics and to understand the historical basis for contemporary developments in ethical theory. Revisions and updates to the new edition of Ethics in Practice focus on covering pressing global issues and adding depth to key sections. Many sections have been expanded to offer more thorough coverage of topics in ethical theory. Edited by Hugh LaFollette, highly regarded for his contributions in the field of practical ethics, this important volume: Explores the connections between ethical theory and divisive contemporary debates Includes general and section introductions which map the conceptual terrain, making it easy for students to understand and discuss the theoretical and practical dimensions of the issues Offers up-to-date incisive discussion global, local, and personal ethical issues Provides original essays, new perspectives, and revisions of key critical texts Enables instructors to discuss specific practical issues, broader groupings of topics, and common themes that connect major areas in ethics Already a market-leading text for introductory and applied ethics courses, the latest edition of Ethics in Practice: An Anthology continues to bean essential resource for instructors and students in philosophy departments around the world.

Green Criminology

Author: Bill McClanahan

Publisher: MDPI

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 94

View: 841

In the past three decades, a stream of criminological inquiry has emerged which explores, measures, and theorizes crimes and harms to the environment at the micro-, mezzo-, and macro-levels. This “green criminology”, as it has come to be known, has widened the criminological gaze to consider crimes and harms committed against air, land (from forests to wetlands), nonhuman animals, and water in local, regional, national, and international areas or arenas. Accordingly, green criminology has endeavored to understand the causes and consequences of air and water pollution, biodiversity loss, climate change, corporate environmental crime (e.g., illegal waste disposal), food production and distribution, resource extraction and exploitation, and wildlife trade and trafficking, while also exploring potential responses to these issues. This book seeks to introduce the green criminological perspective to a broader social science audience. Recognizing that green criminology is not the first social science to explore the phenomena and harms at the intersections of humanity and ecology, this book offers an introduction to some of the unique insights developed over nearly 30 years of green criminological thought and scholarship to students, professors, researchers, and practitioners working in the fields of anthropology, economics, environmental humanities, environmental sociology, geography, history, and political ecology. This book contains contributions from researchers in green criminology from around the world, including early- and mid-career scholars, as well as more established voices in the field—all of whom are dedicated to exposing, understanding, and ultimately hoping to thwart further environmental degradation and despoliation.

Educational Dimensions of School Lunch

Critical Perspectives

Author: Suzanne Rice

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 212

View: 472

School lunch is often regarded as a necessary but inconvenient distraction from the real work of education. Lunch, in this view, is about providing students the nourishment they need in order to attend to academic content and the tests that assess whether content has been learned. In contrast, the central purpose of this collection is to examine school lunch as an educational phenomenon in its own right. Contributing authors—drawing from a variety of disciplinary traditions, including philosophy, sociology, and anthropology—examine school lunch policies and practices, social and cultural aspects of food and eating, and the relation among school food, the environment, and human and non-human animal well-being. The volume also addresses how school lunch might be more widely conceptualized and practiced as an educational undertaking.

Water, Crime and Security in the Twenty-First Century

Too Dirty, Too Little, Too Much

Author: Avi Brisman

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 236

View: 571

Water, Crime and Security in the Twenty-First Century represents criminology’s first book-length contribution to the study of water and water-related crimes, harms and security. The chapters cover topics such as: water pollution, access to fresh water in the Global North and Global South, water and climate change, the commodification of water and privatization, water security and pacification, and activism and resistance surrounding issues of access and pollution. With examples ranging from Rio de Janeiro to Flint, Michigan to the Thames River, this original study offers a comprehensive criminological overview of the contemporary and historical relationship between water and crime. Coinciding with the International Decade for Action, “Water for Sustainable Development,” 2018–2028, this timely volume will be of particular relevance to students and scholars of green criminology, as well as those interested in critical geography, environmental anthropology, environmental sociology, political ecology, and the study of corporate crime and state crime.

Land Justice: Re-imagining Land, Food, and the Commons

Author: Justine M. Williams

Publisher: Food First Books

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 345

View: 722

In recent decades, the various strands of the food movement have made enormous strides in calling attention the many shortcomings and injustices of our food and agricultural system. Farmers, activists, scholars, and everyday citizens have also worked creatively to rebuild local food economies, advocate for food justice, and promote more sustainable, agroecological farming practices. However, the movement for fairer, healthier, and more autonomous food is continually blocked by one obstacle: land access. As long as land remains unaffordable and inaccessible to most people, we cannot truly transform the food system. The term land-grabbing is most commonly used to refer to the large-scale acquisition of agricultural land in Asian, African, or Latin American countries by foreign investors. However, land has and continues to be “grabbed” in North America, as well, through discrimination, real estate speculation, gentrification, financialization, extractive energy production, and tourism. This edited volume, with chapters from a wide range of activists and scholars, explores the history of land theft, dispossession, and consolidation in the United States. It also looks at alternative ways forward toward democratized, land justice, based on redistributive policies and cooperative ownership models. With prefaces from leaders in the food justice and family farming movements, the book opens with a look at the legacies of white-settler colonialism in the southwestern United States. From there, it moves into a collectively-authored section on Black Agrarianism, which details the long history of land dispossession among Black farmers in the southeastern US, as well as the creative acts of resistance they have used to acquire land and collectively farm it. The next section, on gender, explores structural and cultural discrimination against women landowners in the Midwest and also role of “womanism” in land-based struggles. Next, a section on the cross-border implications of land enclosures and consolidations includes a consideration of what land justice could mean for farm workers in the US, followed by an essay on the challenges facing young and aspiring farmers. Finally, the book explores the urban dimensions of land justice and their implications for locally-autonomous food systems, and lessons from previous struggles for democratized land access. Ultimately, the book makes the case that to move forward to a more equitable, just, sustainable, and sovereign agriculture system, the various strands of the food movement must come together for land justice.

Introduction to the US Food System

Public Health, Environment, and Equity

Author: Roni Neff

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Medical

Page: 576

View: 395

A public health approach to the US food system Introduction to the US Food System: Public Health,Environment, and Equity is a comprehensive and engagingtextbook that offers students an overview of today's US foodsystem, with particular focus on the food system'sinterrelationships with public health, the environment, equity, andsociety. Using a classroom-friendly approach, the text covers thecore content of the food system and provides evidence-basedperspectives reflecting the tremendous breadth of issues and ideasimportant to understanding today's US food system. The book is richwith illustrative examples, case studies, activities, anddiscussion questions. The textbook is a project of the Johns Hopkins Center for aLivable Future (CLF), and builds upon the Center's educationalmission to examine the complex interrelationships between diet,food production, environment, and human health to advance anecological perspective in reducing threats to the health of thepublic, and to promote policies that protect health, the globalenvironment, and the ability to sustain life for futuregenerations. Issues covered in Introduction to the US Food Systeminclude food insecurity, social justice, community and workerhealth concerns, food marketing, nutrition, resource depletion, andecological degradation. Presents concepts on the foundations of the US food system,crop production, food system economics, processing and packaging,consumption and overconsumption, and the environmental impacts offood Examines the political factors that influence food and how itis produced Ideal for students and professionals in many fields, includingpublic health, nutritional science, nursing, medicine, environment,policy, business, and social science, among others Introduction to the US Food System presents a broad viewof today's US food system in all its complexity and providesopportunities for students to examine the food system's stickiestproblems and think critically about solutions.

The New Food Activism

Opposition, Cooperation, and Collective Action

Author: Alison Alkon

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 344

View: 229

"New and exciting forms of food activism are emerging as supporters of sustainable agriculture increasingly recognize the need for a broader, more strategic and more politicized food politics that engages with questions of social, racial, and economic justice. This book highlights examples of campaigns to restrict industrial agriculture's use of pesticides and other harmful technologies, struggles to improve the pay and conditions of workers throughout the food system, and alternative projects that seek to de-emphasize notions of individualism and private ownership. Grounded in over a decade of scholarly critique of food activism, this volume seeks to answer the question of "what next," inspiring scholars, students, and activists toward collective, cooperative, and oppositional struggles for change."--Provided by publisher.

Zemiology

Reconnecting Crime and Social Harm

Author: Avi Boukli

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 287

View: 512

This book challenges the given dichotomies between crime and harm, and criminology and zemiology. The main aim of the volume is to highlight the inexorable interconnectedness between systemically induced social harm and the corrosive flows of everyday crime both perpetrated and endured by those victimised by the capitalist system and its hegemonic vicissitudes. Drawing attention not only to various structurally imbedded harms, the chapters also outline the wider consequences of such harms, as they extend beyond immediate victims and contribute towards the further perpetuation of criminogenic and zemiogenic conditions. Comprising two parts, the first explores the relationship between crime and harm and criminology and zemiology, and the second explores the intersections of crime and harm through various lenses, including those trained on probation; global mobility; sexuality and gender; war and gendered violence; fashion counterfeiting; and the harms of the service economy. An exciting and wide-reaching volume written by world-renowned scholars, this collection is a must-read for students, academics, and policy makers in the fields of law, criminology, sociology, social policy, criminal justice, and social justice.

Black Food Matters

Racial Justice in the Wake of Food Justice

Author: Hanna Garth

Publisher: U of Minnesota Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 256

View: 742

An in-depth look at Black food and the challenges it faces today For Black Americans, the food system is broken. When it comes to nutrition, Black consumers experience an unjust and inequitable distribution of resources. Black Food Matters examines these issues through in-depth essays that analyze how Blackness is contested through food, differing ideas of what makes our sustenance “healthy,” and Black individuals’ own beliefs about what their cuisine should be. Primarily written by nonwhite scholars, and framed through a focus on Black agency instead of deprivation, the essays here showcase Black communities fighting for the survival of their food culture. The book takes readers into the real world of Black sustenance, examining animal husbandry practices in South Carolina, the work done by the Black Panthers to ensure food equality, and Black women who are pioneering urban agriculture. These essays also explore individual and community values, the influence of history, and the ongoing struggle to meet needs and affirm Black life. A comprehensive look at Black food culture and the various forms of violence that threaten the future of this cuisine, Black Food Matters centers Blackness in a field that has too often framed Black issues through a white-centric lens, offering new ways to think about access, privilege, equity, and justice. Contributors: Adam Bledsoe, U of Minnesota; Billy Hall; Analena Hope Hassberg, California State Polytechnic U, Pomona; Yuson Jung, Wayne State U; Kimberly Kasper, Rhodes College; Tyler McCreary, Florida State U; Andrew Newman, Wayne State U; Gillian Richards-Greaves, Coastal Carolina U; Monica M. White, U of Wisconsin–Madison; Brian Williams, Mississippi State U; Judith Williams, Florida International U; Psyche Williams-Forson, U of Maryland, College Park; Willie J. Wright, Rutgers U.

Beginning to End Hunger

Food and the Environment in Belo Horizonte, Brazil, and Beyond

Author: M. Jahi Chappell

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 272

View: 696

Beginning to End Hunger presents the story of Belo Horizonte, home to 2.5 million people and the site of one of the world’s most successful city-run food security programs. Since its Municipal Secretariat of Food and Nutritional Security was founded in 1993, Belo Horizonte has sharply reduced malnutrition, leading it to serve as an inspiration for Brazil’s renowned Zero Hunger programs. The secretariat’s work with local family farmers shows how food security, rural livelihoods, and healthy ecosystems can be supported together. While inevitably imperfect, Belo Horizonte offers a vision of a path away from food system dysfunction, unsustainability, and hunger. In this convincing case study, M. Jahi Chappell establishes the importance of holistic approaches to food security, suggests how to design successful policies to end hunger, and lays out strategies for enacting policy change. With these tools, we can take the next steps toward achieving similar reductions in hunger and food insecurity elsewhere in the developed and developing worlds.

Food Insecurity

A Matter of Justice, Sovereignty, and Survival

Author: Tamar Mayer

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 236

View: 394

This book explores the experiences, causes, and consequences of food insecurity in different geographical regions and historical eras. It highlights collective and political actions aimed at food sovereignty as solutions to mitigate suffering. Despite global efforts to end hunger, it persists and has even increased in some regions. This book provides interdisciplinary and historical perspectives on the manifestations of food insecurity, with case studies illustrating how people coped with violations of their rights during the war-time deprivation in France; the neoliberal incursions on food supply in Turkey, Greece, and Nicaragua; as well as the consequences of radioactive contamination of farmland in Japan. This edited collection adopts an analytical approach to understanding food insecurity by examining how the historical and political situations in different countries have resulted in an unfolding dialectic of food insecurity and resistance, with the most marginalized people—immigrants, those in refugee camps, poor peasants, and so forth—consistently suffering the worst effects, yet still maintaining agency to fight back. The book tackles food insecurity on a local as well as a global scale and will thus be useful for a broad range of audiences, including students, scholars, and the general public interested in studying food crises, globalization, and current global issues.

Critical Perspectives on Food Sovereignty

Global Agrarian Transformations

Author: Marc Edelman

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 370

View: 829

This volume is a pioneering contribution to the study of food politics and critical agrarian studies, where food sovereignty has emerged as a pivotal concept over the past few decades, with a wide variety of social movements, on-the-ground experiments, and policy innovations flying under its broad banner. Despite its large and growing popularity, the history, theoretical foundations, and political program of food sovereignty have only occasionally received in-depth analysis and critical scrutiny. This collection brings together both longstanding scholars in critical agrarian studies, such as Philip McMichael, Bina Agarwal, Henry Bernstein, Jan Douwe van der Ploeg, and Marc Edelman, as well as a dynamic roster of early- and mid-career researchers. The ultimate aim is to advance this important frontier of research and organizing, and put food sovereignty on stronger footing as a mobilizing frame, a policy objective, and a plan of action for the human future. This volume was published as part one of the special double issue celebrating the 40th anniversary of the Journal of Peasant Studies.

Religion and Politics: New Developments Worldwide

Author: Roy C. Amore

Publisher: MDPI

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 194

View: 940

Religion and Politics: New Developments Worldwide features ten articles about recent developments in the interaction of Religion and Politics in various countries of Asia, Africa, Europe, and both North and South America. Most articles focus on one country, and including China, South Korea, India, Nigeria, Malaysia, France, and Cuba. Others address issues across regions such as Latin America, Southeast Asia, or the Middle East. The fifteen contributors are scholars from diverse disciplines as well as diverse regions of Asia, Europe, Africa, and the Americas. Subjects include the Indian government’s favoritism for Hinduism over rival religions; the way the Sikhs of India avoid the religion–politics divide; the way the Western media fails to fully understand the Chinese government’s policies on religious minorities; the aftermath of the Charlie Hebdo demonstrations in France; religious attitudes toward tax politics in South Korea as well as among Christians compared to Muslims; how to lessen the radicalization of Muslims in Southeast Asia; whether Nigeria should encourage its Muslims to be active in the Organisation of Islamic Cooperation; the spiritual role played by the permaculture movement in Cuba; and how the former tendency of scholars to polarize religion and politics is no longer viable, especially in Latin America.