The Tin Man

Author: Dale Brown

Publisher: Bantam

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 464

View: 156

The master of military adventure creates the ultimate one-man army.... New York Times bestselling author Dale Brown pits men and technology against impossible odds, in vividly realized stories. Now, in his eleventh novel, he brings aerial combat hero Patrick McLanahan out of retirement and plunges him into the most personal war he's ever fought. His old enemy Gregory Townsend has come to America to ignite a reign of terror that will sweep across the nation. The police and the government seem powerless to stop him. And one of the first casualties in this war is a rookie cop--McLanahan's brother. McLanahan has plenty of experience in war. And so does arms expert Jon Masters. Using Masters's deadliest weapon yet, McLanahan becomes a one-man army, known on the streets as the Tin Man. But this time, technology is a double-edged sword--and his war of revenge may destroy McLanahan himself... and everything he stands for. From the Paperback edition.

The Lab Rat Chronicles

Author: George Burro's

Publisher: iUniverse

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 720

View: 209

How do you communicate with your government? When do you trade your values for theirs? What is the trade off for the American Dream? This is one person's account of his struggle to substantiate the realities he has experienced; to those that would expect him to submit to theirs.

The Sea and Civilization

A Maritime History of the World

Author: Lincoln Paine

Publisher: Atlantic Books Ltd

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 300

View: 480

A monumental, wholly accessible work of scholarship that retells human history through the story of mankind's relationship with the sea. An accomplishment of both great sweep and illuminating detail, The Sea and Civilization is a stunning work of history that reveals in breathtaking depth how people first came into contact with one another by ocean and river, and how goods, languages, religions, and entire cultures spread across and along the world's waterways. Lincoln Paine takes us back to the origins of long-distance migration by sea with our ancestors' first forays from Africa and Eurasia to Australia and the Americas. He demonstrates the critical role of maritime trade to the civilizations of ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, and the Indus Valley. He reacquaints us with the great seafaring cultures of antiquity like those of the Phoenicians and Greeks, as well as those of India, Southeast and East Asia who parlayed their navigational skills, shipbuilding techniques, and commercial acumen to establish vibrant overseas colonies and trade routes in the centuries leading up to the age of European overseas expansion. His narrative traces subsequent developments in commercial and naval shipping through the post-Cold War era. Above all, Paine makes clear how the rise and fall of civilizations can be traced to the sea.