Finding Wisdom in East Asian Classics

Author: William Theodore De Bary

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 418

View: 350

Finding Wisdom in East Asian Classics is an essential, all-access guide to the core texts of East Asian civilization and culture. Essays address frequently read, foundational texts in Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and Vietnamese, as well as early modern fictional classics and nonfiction works of the seventeenth century. Building strong links between these writings and the critical traditions of Confucianism, Buddhism, and Daoism, this volume shows the vital role of the classics in the shaping of Asian history and in the development of the humanities at large. Wm. Theodore de Bary focuses on texts that have survived for centuries, if not millennia, through avid questioning and contestation. Recognized as perennial reflections on life and society, these works represent diverse historical periods and cultures and include the Analects of Confucius, Mencius, Laozi, Xunxi, the Lotus Sutra, Tang poetry, the Pillow Book, The Tale of Genji, and the writings of Chikamatsu and Kaibara Ekken. Contributors explain the core and most commonly understood aspects of these works and how they operate within their traditions. They trace their reach and reinvention throughout history and their ongoing relevance in modern life. With fresh interpretations of familiar readings, these essays inspire renewed appreciation and examination. In the case of some classics open to multiple interpretations, de Bary chooses two complementary essays from different contributors. Expanding on debates concerning the challenges of teaching classics in the twenty-first century, several pieces speak to the value of Asia in the core curriculum. Indispensable for early scholarship on Asia and the evolution of global civilization, Finding Wisdom in East Asian Classics helps one master the major texts of human thought.

The Great Civilized Conversation

Education for a World Community

Author: Wm. Theodore de Bary

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 432

View: 622

Having spent decades teaching and researching the humanities, Wm. Theodore de Bary is well positioned to speak on its merits and reform. Believing a classical liberal education is more necessary than ever, he outlines in these essays a plan to update existing core curricula by incorporating classics from both Eastern and Western traditions, thereby bringing the philosophy and moral values of Asian civilizations to American students and vice versa. The author establishes a concrete link between teaching the classics of world civilizations and furthering global humanism. Selecting texts that share many of the same values and educational purposes, he joins Islamic, Indian, Chinese, Japanese, and Western sources into a revised curriculum that privileges humanity and civility. He also explores the tradition of education in China and its reflection of Confucian and Neo-Confucian beliefs. He reflects on historyÕs great scholar-teachers and what their methods can teach us today, and he dedicates three essays to the power of The Analects of Confucius, The Tale of Genji, and The Pillow Book of Sei Shonagon in the classroom.

Trade - The Engine of Growth in East Asia

Author: Peter C. Y. Chow

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 184

View: 101

The New Industrializing Countries (NICs) of the Pacific Basin--Taiwan, South Korea, Hong Kong, and Singapore--differ in many ways such as their languages, cultures, political and economic systems. What is interesting is what economic characteristic they hold in common. Each has succeeded in defying in what Chow and Kellman define as a "vicious circle of poverty" following World War II. They provide a comprehensive analysis of the economic factors which fueled the "engine of growth." The authors combine a detailed body of empirical data with an unusually broad theoretical framework to highlight the factors in each industry and market which contributed to the success of these countries. The work examines and forecasts potential competition from the surrounding geographic area in specific markets. It contrasts the development of the NICs with Japan, with "next tier NICs," and with each other in markets, including those of the United States and the forthcoming united Europe. Using modern economic theory and sophisticated quantitative techniques, Trade - The Engine of Growth in East Asia will clearly help scholars, students, policymakers, and professionals in understanding these East Asian models of growth.

The East Asian World-System

Climate and Dynastic Change

Author: Eugene N. Anderson

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Electronic books

Page: 248

View: 108

This book studies the East Asian world-system and its dynastic cycles as they were influenced by climate and demographic change, diseases, the expansion of trade, and the rise of science and technology. By studying the history of East Asia until the beginning of the 20th century and offering a comparative perspective on East Asian countries, including China, Japan and Korea, it describes the historical evolution of the East Asian world-system as being the result of good or poor management of the respective populations and environments. Lastly, the book discusses how the East Asian regions have become integrated into a single world-system by a combination of trade, commerce, and military action. Given its scope, the book will appeal to scholars of history, sociology, political science and environmental studies, and to anyone interested in learning about the effects of climate change on the dynamic development of societies.

Human rights in East Asia

a cultural perspective

Author: James Chieh Hsiung

Publisher: Washington Inst Pr

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 165

View: 966

The Oxford Handbook of Buddhist Ethics

Author: Daniel Cozort

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 704

View: 559

Many forms of Buddhism, divergent in philosophy and style, emerged as Buddhism filtered out of India into other parts of Asia. Nonetheless, all of them embodied an ethical core that is remarkably consistent. Articulated by the historical Buddha in his first sermon, this moral core is founded on the concept of karma--that intentions and actions have future consequences for an individual--and is summarized as Right Speech, Right Action, and Right Livelihood, three of the elements of the Eightfold Path. Although they were later elaborated and interpreted in a multitude of ways, none of these core principles were ever abandoned. The Oxford Handbook of Buddhist Ethics provides a comprehensive overview of the field of Buddhist ethics in the twenty-first century. The Handbook discusses the foundations of Buddhist ethics focusing on karma and the precepts looking at abstinence from harming others, stealing, and intoxication. It considers ethics in the different Buddhist traditions and the similarities they share, and compares Buddhist ethics to Western ethics and the psychology of moral judgments. The volume also investigates Buddhism and society analysing economics, environmental ethics, and Just War ethics. The final section focuses on contemporary issues surrounding Buddhist ethics, including gender, sexuality, animal rights, and euthanasia. This groundbreaking collection offers an indispensable reference work for students and scholars of Buddhist ethics and comparative moral philosophy.