FIGHT BACK

PUNK, POLITICS AND RESISTANCE

Author: The Subcultures Network

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 336

View: 747

Fight back examines the different ways punk - as a youth/subculture - may provide space for political expression and action. Bringing together scholars from a range of academic disciplines (history, sociology, cultural studies, politics, English, music), it showcases innovative research into the diverse ways in which punk may be used and interpreted. The essays are concerned with three main themes: identity, locality and communication. These, in turn, cover subjects relating to questions of class, age and gender; the relationship between punk, locality and socio-political context; and the ways in which punk's meaning has been expressed from within the subculture and reflected by the media. Jon Savage, the foremost commentator and curator of punk's cultural legacy, provides an afterword on punk's impact and dissemination from the 1970s to the present day.

Exam Prep for: Fight Back Punk, Politics and Resistance

Author: David Mason

Publisher: Rico Publications

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 800

View: 154

Political science is a social science which deals with systems of governance, and the analysis of political activities, political thoughts, and political behavior. This book provides over 2,000 Exam Prep questions and answers to accompany the text Fight Back Punk, Politics and Resistance Items include highly probable exam items: Military, case studies, Federalism, Rechtsstaat, Town meeting, Sedition, Tradition, Energy policy, Alien, Same-sex marriage, Consumer product, Due process, Eisenhower, and more.

No Future

Punk, Politics and British Youth Culture, 1976–1984

Author: Matthew Worley

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 310

View: 729

An innovative history of British youth culture during the 1970s and 1980s, charting the full spectrum of punk's cultural development.

Post-Punk, Politics and Pleasure in Britain

Author: David Wilkinson

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 228

View: 656

As the Sex Pistols were breaking up, Britain was entering a new era. Punk’s filth and fury had burned brightly and briefly; soon a new underground offered a more sustained and constructive challenge. As future-focused, independently released singles appeared in the wake of the Sex Pistols, there were high hopes in magazines like NME and the DIY fanzine media spawned by punk. Post-Punk, Politics and Pleasure in Britain explores how post-punk’s politics developed into the 1980s. Illustrating that the movement’s monochrome gloom was illuminated by residual flickers of countercultural utopianism, it situates post-punk in the ideological crossfire of a key political struggle of the era: a battle over pleasure and freedom between emerging Thatcherism and libertarian, feminist and countercultural movements dating back to the post-war New Left. Case studies on bands including Gang of Four, The Fall and the Slits and labels like Rough Trade move sensitively between close reading, historical context and analysis of who made post-punk and how it was produced and mediated. The book examines, too, how the struggles of post-punk resonate down to the present.

Sounds French

Globalization, Cultural Communities and Pop Music, 1958-1980

Author: Jonathyne Briggs

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 248

View: 404

Sounds French examines the history of popular music in France between the arrival of rock and roll in 1958 and the collapse of the first wave of punk in 1980, and the connections between musical genres and concepts of community in French society. During this period, scholars have tended to view the social upheavals associated with postwar reconstruction as part of debates concerning national identity in French culture and politics, a tendency that developed from political figures' and intellectuals' concerns with French national identity. In this book, author Jonathyne Briggs reorients the scholarship away from an exclusive focus on national identity and instead towards an investigation of other identities that develop as a result of the increased globalization of culture. Popular music, at once individual and communal, fixed and plastic, offers an illuminating window into such transformations in social structures through the ways in which musicians, musical consumers, and critical intermediaries re-imagined themselves as part of novel cultural communities, whether local, national, or supranational in nature. Briggs argues that national identity was but one of a panoply of identities in flux during the postwar period in France, demonstrating that the development of hybridized forms of popular music provided the French with a method for expressing and understanding that flux. Drawing upon an array of printed and aural sources, including music publications, sound recordings, record sleeves, biographies, and cultural criticism, Sounds French is an essential new look at popular music in postwar France.

White Riot

Punk Rock and the Politics of Race

Author: Stephen Duncombe

Publisher: Verso Books

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 336

View: 109

From the Clash to Los Crudos, skinheads to afro-punks, the punk rock movement has been obsessed by race. And yet the connections have never been traced in a comprehensive way. White Riot is a definitive study of the subject, collecting first-person writing, lyrics, letters to zines, and analyses of punk history from across the globe. This book brings together writing from leading critics such as Greil Marcus and Dick Hebdige, personal reflections from punk pioneers such as Jimmy Pursey, Darryl Jenifer and Mimi Nguyen, and reports on punk scenes from Toronto to Jakarta.

Culture Jamming

Activism and the Art of Cultural Resistance

Author: Marilyn DeLaure

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 464

View: 453

A collaboration of political activism and participatory culture seeking to upend consumer capitalism, including interviews with The Yes Men, The Guerrilla Girls, among others. Coined in the 1980s, “culture jamming” refers to an array of tactics deployed by activists to critique, subvert, and otherwise “jam” the workings of consumer culture. Ranging from media hoaxes and advertising parodies to flash mobs and street art, these actions seek to interrupt the flow of dominant, capitalistic messages that permeate our daily lives. Employed by Occupy Wall Street protesters and the Russian feminist punk band Pussy Riot alike, culture jamming scrambles the signal, injects the unexpected, and spurs audiences to think critically and challenge the status quo. The essays, interviews, and creative work assembled in this unique volume explore the shifting contours of culture jamming by plumbing its history, mapping its transformations, testing its force, and assessing its efficacy. Revealing how culture jamming is at once playful and politically transgressive, this accessible collection explores the degree to which culture jamming has fulfilled its revolutionary aims. Featuring original essays from prominent media scholars discussing Banksy and Shepard Fairey, foundational texts such as Mark Dery’s culture jamming manifesto, and artwork by and interviews with noteworthy culture jammers including the Guerrilla Girls, The Yes Men, and Reverend Billy, Culture Jamming makes a crucial contribution to our understanding of creative resistance and participatory culture.

What We Want Is Free

Generosity and Exchange in Recent Art

Author: Ted Purves

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 184

View: 370

Examines the way recent artists have incorporated concepts of generosity into their work.

Resistance

A Radical Political and Social History of the Lower East Side

Author: Clayton Patterson

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 624

View: 767

A ground-level political history of New York's Lower East Side.