Fear on Trial

Author: John Henry Faulk

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 278

View: 413

John Henry Faulk was a popular radio and television personality during the McCarthy era. He was host of his own radio program on WCBS in New York when he publicly challenged AWARE, Inc., an ultrapatriotic group engaged in the systematic blacklisting of entertainment personalities. In response, an AWARE bulletin accused Faulk himself of subversive associations. Angry and frightened by this accusation, Faulk brought suit against AWARE, charging conspiracy to libel him and to destroy his career. Thus began one of the great civil rights cases of this century. John Henry Faulk recounts the story of this harrowing time in Fear on Trial, the dramatic account of his six years on the "blacklist"—an exile that began with the AWARE bulletin and ended with his vindication by a jury award of $3,500,000—the largest libel award in U.S. history at that time. The heart of the book is the trial of Faulk's libel action against AWARE, in which attorney Louis Nizer relentlessly exposed the blacklist for what it was—a cynical disdain of elementary decency couched in the rhetoric of patriotism. Many of the people involved in the Faulk case were and are famous: attorneys Nizer and Roy Cohn; Edward R. Murrow and Charles Collingwood; Myrna Loy, Kim Hunter, Tony Randall, and Lee Grant; J. Frank Dobie; Ed Sullivan, David Susskind, and Mark Goodson. But the hero is Faulk himself, a man who—in the words of Studs Terkel—"faced the bastards and beat them down."

Trial by Fear

Author: David Pennington

Publisher: Xulon Press

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 240

View: 945

Ryan Pennington became ensnared by a whirlwind of paralyzing fear as he began to weigh in his mind his standing with God. He began to believe that at any moment he could die and go to hell. Tormented with this thought, he gradually became totally depleted physically, mentally, emotionally, and spiritually. God in His amazing grace brought Ryan back to a place of faith and confidence in his standing with God. Learn from this book the ten elements that any potential trial presents and how to deal with them biblically.

Trial by Fear

Author: Jonathan Mycroft

Publisher: iUniverse

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 312

View: 434

Simon Jacks is an idealistic young attorney with a prestigious Chicago law firm, about to start the most important case of his career, defending the accused in a series of grisly sex slayings dubbed The Toolbox Murders. But in a moment of stress Simon throws a punch at another attorney and is ordered to take some time off. Retreating to a secluded island cabin in northern Michigan with his family and friends, Simon hopes for a relaxing vacation. Instead he encounters conflicting ideologies, jealousy, and betrayal. And more. Someone is stalking them. Soon, childish pranks turn deadly in an episode of terror. To survive, Simon may have to sacrifice his most precious conviction: that everyone deserves a fair trial.

Trial By Fear

Author: Bruce E. Arrington

Publisher: Pipe Dream Books

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 140

View: 367

A defeated kingdom. A forgotten prince. A powerful resurrection. Imagine what your life would be like if you were raised by goblins. Forced into slavery, abused without mercy, and never having enough food to eat. Your worldview warps to the point of no return. In a despairing act of self-preservation, a young teen named Beon escapes his post. But he pays the ultimate price as ruthless goblins hunt him down. The kindness of a stranger with great powers gifts Beon with a new life, one with a promising future. But although Beon's body is restored, his ability to cope with challenges is not. This potential for a future is threatened if he can’t control that which has crippled his ability to function normally: his fears.

Without Fear

The Life and Trial of Bhagat Singh

Author: Kuldip Nayar

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: India

Page: 244

View: 538

Pluralism in International Criminal Law

Author: Elies van Sliedregt

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 410

View: 436

Despite the growth in international criminal courts and tribunals, the majority of cases concerning international criminal law are prosecuted at the domestic level. This means that both international and domestic courts have to contend with a plethora of relevant, but often contradictory, judgments by international institutions and by other domestic courts. This book provides a detailed investigation into the impact this pluralism has had on international criminal law and procedure, and examines the key problems which arise from it. The work identifies the various interpretations of the concept of pluralism and discusses how it manifests in a broad range of aspects of international criminal law and practice. These include substantive jurisdiction, the definition of crimes, modes of individual criminal responsibility for international crimes, sentencing, fair trial rights, law of evidence, truth-finding, and challenges faced by both international and domestic courts in gathering, testing and evaluating evidence. Authored by leading practitioners and academics in the field, the book employs pluralism as a methodological tool to advance the debate beyond the classic view of 'legal pluralism' leading to a problematic fragmentation of the international legal order. It argues instead that pluralism is a fundamental and indispensable feature of international criminal law which permeates it on several levels: through multiple legal regimes and enforcement fora, diversified sources and interpretations of concepts, and numerous identities underpinning the law and practice. The book addresses the virtues and dangers of pluralism, reflecting on the need for, and prospects of, harmonization of international criminal law around a common grammar. It ultimately brings together the theories of legal pluralism, the comparative law discourse on legal transplants, harmonization, and convergence, and the international legal debate on fragmentation to show where pluralism and divergence will need to be accepted as regular, and even beneficial, features of international criminal justice.

The Fear Within

Spies, Commies, and American Democracy on Trial

Author: Scott Martelle

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 881

Sixty years ago political divisions in the United States ran even deeper than today's name-calling showdowns between the left and right. Back then, to call someone a communist was to threaten that person's career, family, freedom, and, sometimes, life itself. Hysteria about the "red menace" mushroomed as the Soviet Union tightened its grip on Eastern Europe, Mao Zedong rose to power in China, and the atomic arms race accelerated. Spy scandals fanned the flames, and headlines warned of sleeper cells in the nation's midst--just as it does today with the "War on Terror." In his new book, The Fear Within, Scott Martelle takes dramatic aim at one pivotal moment of that era. On the afternoon of July 20, 1948, FBI agents began rounding up twelve men in New York City, Chicago, and Detroit whom the U.S. government believed posed a grave threat to the nation--the leadership of the Communist Party-USA. After a series of delays, eleven of the twelve "top Reds" went on trial in Manhattan's Foley Square in January 1949. The proceedings captivated the nation, but the trial quickly dissolved into farce. The eleven defendants were charged under the 1940 Smith Act with conspiring to teach the necessity of overthrowing the U.S. government based on their roles as party leaders and their distribution of books and pamphlets. In essence, they were on trial for their libraries and political beliefs, not for overt acts threatening national security. Despite the clear conflict with the First Amendment, the men were convicted and their appeals denied by the U.S. Supreme Court in a decision that gave the green light to federal persecution of Communist Party leaders--a decision the court effectively reversed six years later. But by then, the damage was done. So rancorous was the trial the presiding judge sentenced the defense attorneys to prison terms, too, chilling future defendants' access to qualified counsel. Martelle's story is a compelling look at how American society, both general and political, reacts to stress and, incongruously, clamps down in times of crisis on the very beliefs it holds dear: the freedoms of speech and political belief. At different points in our history, the executive branch, Congress, and the courts have subtly or more drastically eroded a pillar of American society for the politics of the moment. It is not surprising, then, that The Fear Within takes on added resonance in today's environment of suspicion and the decline of civil rights under the U.S. Patriot Act.

The Preparation and Trial of Medical Malpractice Cases

Author: Richard E. Shandell

Publisher: Law Journal Press

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 754

View: 811

The Preparation and Trial of Medical Malpractice Cases treats a case as a continuous process, from interviewing the client to closing argument. It offers comprehensive coverage of the questions surrounding health maintenance organizations, including case law on the right to sue an HMO as well as its participating physicians. You'll find discussion of: how to recognize a meritorious case; the doctrine of alternative liability; the evidentiary value of FDA approval or non-approval; the continuing treatment doctrine; state statutes regarding motion practice; malpractice liability of alternative medical practitioners; the admissibility of evidence comparing physicians' risk statistics to those of other physicians; use of expert testimony to establish res ipsa loquitur in negligence; the modified standard of proximate cause when a physician's negligence exacerbates a patient's existing condition; violation of the duty to disclose information; contributory negligence in informed consent; distinguishing between medical malpractice and ordinary negligence; liability of nurses; and more. Appendices demonstrate how to analyze a medical brief, depose and examine the defendant physician, and elicit testimony from your own expert witness. Also included are a sample Bill of Particulars, a sample jury charge and a list of Web sites to assist your medical research.

Fear and Loathing in Ancient Athens

Religion and Politics During the Peloponnesian War

Author: Alexander Rubel

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 316

View: 415

Athens at the time of the Peloponnesian war was the arena for a dramatic battle between politics and religion in the hearts and minds of the people. Fear and Loathing in Ancient Athens, originally published in German but now available for the first time in an expanded and revised English edition, sheds new light on this dramatic period of history and offers a new approach to the study of Greek religion. The book explores an extraordinary range of events and topics, and will be an indispensable study for students and scholars studying Athenian religion and politics.