Extending the Linear Model with R

Generalized Linear, Mixed Effects and Nonparametric Regression Models, Second Edition

Author: Julian J. Faraway

Publisher: CRC Press

ISBN:

Category: Mathematics

Page: 399

View: 878

Start Analyzing a Wide Range of Problems Since the publication of the bestselling, highly recommended first edition, R has considerably expanded both in popularity and in the number of packages available. Extending the Linear Model with R: Generalized Linear, Mixed Effects and Nonparametric Regression Models, Second Edition takes advantage of the greater functionality now available in R and substantially revises and adds several topics. New to the Second Edition Expanded coverage of binary and binomial responses, including proportion responses, quasibinomial and beta regression, and applied considerations regarding these models New sections on Poisson models with dispersion, zero inflated count models, linear discriminant analysis, and sandwich and robust estimation for generalized linear models (GLMs) Revised chapters on random effects and repeated measures that reflect changes in the lme4 package and show how to perform hypothesis testing for the models using other methods New chapter on the Bayesian analysis of mixed effect models that illustrates the use of STAN and presents the approximation method of INLA Revised chapter on generalized linear mixed models to reflect the much richer choice of fitting software now available Updated coverage of splines and confidence bands in the chapter on nonparametric regression New material on random forests for regression and classification Revamped R code throughout, particularly the many plots using the ggplot2 package Revised and expanded exercises with solutions now included Demonstrates the Interplay of Theory and Practice This textbook continues to cover a range of techniques that grow from the linear regression model. It presents three extensions to the linear framework: GLMs, mixed effect models, and nonparametric regression models. The book explains data analysis using real examples and includes all the R commands necessary to reproduce the analyses.

Generalized Linear Mixed Models

Modern Concepts, Methods and Applications

Author: Walter W. Stroup

Publisher: CRC Press

ISBN:

Category: Mathematics

Page: 555

View: 617

Generalized Linear Mixed Models: Modern Concepts, Methods and Applications presents an introduction to linear modeling using the generalized linear mixed model (GLMM) as an overarching conceptual framework. For readers new to linear models, the book helps them see the big picture. It shows how linear models fit with the rest of the core statistics curriculum and points out the major issues that statistical modelers must consider. Along with describing common applications of GLMMs, the text introduces the essential theory and main methodology associated with linear models that accommodate random model effects and non-Gaussian data. Unlike traditional linear model textbooks that focus on normally distributed data, this one adopts a generalized mixed model approach throughout: data for linear modeling need not be normally distributed and effects may be fixed or random. With numerous examples using SAS® PROC GLIMMIX, this book is ideal for graduate students in statistics, statistics professionals seeking to update their knowledge, and researchers new to the generalized linear model thought process. It focuses on data-driven processes and provides context for extending traditional linear model thinking to generalized linear mixed modeling. See Professor Stroup discuss the book.

Nonparametric Methods in Statistics with SAS Applications

Author: Olga Korosteleva

Publisher: CRC Press

ISBN:

Category: Mathematics

Page: 195

View: 493

Designed for a graduate course in applied statistics, Nonparametric Methods in Statistics with SAS Applications teaches students how to apply nonparametric techniques to statistical data. It starts with the tests of hypotheses and moves on to regression modeling, time-to-event analysis, density estimation, and resampling methods. The text begins with classical nonparametric hypotheses testing, including the sign, Wilcoxon sign-rank and rank-sum, Ansari-Bradley, Kolmogorov-Smirnov, Friedman rank, Kruskal-Wallis H, Spearman rank correlation coefficient, and Fisher exact tests. It then discusses smoothing techniques (loess and thin-plate splines) for classical nonparametric regression as well as binary logistic and Poisson models. The author also describes time-to-event nonparametric estimation methods, such as the Kaplan-Meier survival curve and Cox proportional hazards model, and presents histogram and kernel density estimation methods. The book concludes with the basics of jackknife and bootstrap interval estimation. Drawing on data sets from the author’s many consulting projects, this classroom-tested book includes various examples from psychology, education, clinical trials, and other areas. It also presents a set of exercises at the end of each chapter. All examples and exercises require the use of SAS 9.3 software. Complete SAS codes for all examples are given in the text. Large data sets for the exercises are available on the author’s website.

Introduction to Probability with R

Author: Kenneth Baclawski

Publisher: Chapman and Hall/CRC

ISBN:

Category: Design

Page: 363

View: 637

Based on a popular course taught by the late Gian-Carlo Rota of MIT, with many new topics covered as well, Introduction to Probability with R presents R programs and animations to provide an intuitive yet rigorous understanding of how to model natural phenomena from a probabilistic point of view. Although the R programs are small in length, they are just as sophisticated and powerful as longer programs in other languages. This brevity makes it easy for students to become proficient in R. This calculus-based introduction organizes the material around key themes. One of the most important themes centers on viewing probability as a way to look at the world, helping students think and reason probabilistically. The text also shows how to combine and link stochastic processes to form more complex processes that are better models of natural phenomena. In addition, it presents a unified treatment of transforms, such as Laplace, Fourier, and z; the foundations of fundamental stochastic processes using entropy and information; and an introduction to Markov chains from various viewpoints. Each chapter includes a short biographical note about a contributor to probability theory, exercises, and selected answers. The book has an accompanying website with more information.

Stochastic Processes

An Introduction, Second Edition

Author: Peter Watts Jones

Publisher: Chapman and Hall/CRC

ISBN:

Category: Mathematics

Page: 221

View: 280

This text begins with a review of relevant fundamental probability. It then covers several basic gambling problems, random walks, and Markov chains. The authors go on to develop random processes continuous in time, including Poisson, birth and death processes, and general population models.

Bayesian Ideas and Data Analysis

An Introduction for Scientists and Statisticians

Author: Ronald Christensen

Publisher: CRC Press

ISBN:

Category: Mathematics

Page: 516

View: 763

Emphasizing the use of WinBUGS and R to analyze real data, Bayesian Ideas and Data Analysis: An Introduction for Scientists and Statisticians presents statistical tools to address scientific questions. It highlights foundational issues in statistics, the importance of making accurate predictions, and the need for scientists and statisticians to collaborate in analyzing data. The WinBUGS code provided offers a convenient platform to model and analyze a wide range of data. The first five chapters of the book contain core material that spans basic Bayesian ideas, calculations, and inference, including modeling one and two sample data from traditional sampling models. The text then covers Monte Carlo methods, such as Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulation. After discussing linear structures in regression, it presents binomial regression, normal regression, analysis of variance, and Poisson regression, before extending these methods to handle correlated data. The authors also examine survival analysis and binary diagnostic testing. A complementary chapter on diagnostic testing for continuous outcomes is available on the book’s website. The last chapter on nonparametric inference explores density estimation and flexible regression modeling of mean functions. The appropriate statistical analysis of data involves a collaborative effort between scientists and statisticians. Exemplifying this approach, Bayesian Ideas and Data Analysis focuses on the necessary tools and concepts for modeling and analyzing scientific data. Data sets and codes are provided on a supplemental website.