Euripides: Phoenissae

Author: Euripides

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 673

View: 533

This volume provides a thorough philological and dramatic commentary on Euripides' Phoenissae, the first detailed commentary in English since 1911. An introduction surveys the play, its possible date, features of the original production, the background of Theban myth, the general problem of interpolation, and the textual tradition. The commentary treats the constitution of the text, noteworthy features of diction and style, dramatic technique and structure, and the controversies over possible later additions to the text.

Narrative, Intertext, and Space in Euripides' "Phoenissae"

Author: Anna A. Lamari

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter

ISBN:

Category: Drama

Page: 259

View: 705

This book applies the basic principles of narratology to an ancient Greek tragedy, namely Euripides’ Phoenissae. In a play with an exceptionally rich plot, a narratological study yields interesting interpretive results regarding the use of myth, narrators, narrative levels, time and space, as well as the relation of the Phoenissae with previous treatments of the Theban mythical saga.

Euripides: Phoenician Women

Author: Thalia Papadopolou

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 140

View: 532

"Phoenician Women", one of Euripides' later tragedies, is an intriguing play that arguably displays some of his finest dramatic technique. Rich in cast and varied in incident, it is an example of Euripides' experimentation with structure. It dramatises the most fertile mythical tradition of the city of Thebes and its doomed royal family, focusing in particular on the conflict between Eteocles and Polyneices as a result of their father Oedipus' curse, which eventually leads to mutual fratricide. The play was very popular throughout antiquity, and became part of the so-called "Byzantine Triad" (along with "Hecuba" and "Orestes"), of plays studied in the school curriculum.Thalia Papadopoulou here offers a thorough survey of the play in its historical context, against the background of Athenian tragedy and Euripidean dramaturgy. Employing various critical approaches, she investigates the literary tradition and the dynamics of intertextuality, Euripidean dramatic technique, the use of rhetoric, characterisation, gender, the function of the Chorus, aspects of performance and the reception of the play from antiquity to modern times.

Greed and Injustice in Classical Athens

Author: Ryan K. Balot

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 312

View: 903

In this original and rewarding combination of intellectual and political history, Ryan Balot offers a thorough historical and sociological interpretation of classical Athens centered on the notion of greed. Integrating ancient philosophy, poetry, and history, and drawing on modern political thought, the author demonstrates that the Athenian discourse on greed was an essential component of Greek social development and political history. Over time, the Athenians developed sophisticated psychological and political accounts of acquisitiveness and a correspondingly rich vocabulary to describe and condemn it. Greed figures repeatedly as an object of criticism in authors as diverse as Solon, Thucydides, and Plato--all of whom addressed the social disruptions caused by it, as well as the inadequacy of lives focused on it. Because of its ethical significance, greed surfaced frequently in theoretical debates about democracy and oligarchy. Ultimately, critiques of greed--particularly the charge that it is unjust--were built into the robust accounts of justice formulated by many philosophers, including Plato and Aristotle. Such critiques of greed both reflected and were inextricably knitted into economic history and political events, including the coups of 411 and 404 B.C. Balot contrasts ancient Greek thought on distributive justice with later Western traditions, with implications for political and economic history well beyond the classical period. Because the belief that greed is good holds a dominant position in modern justifications of capitalism, this study provides a deep historical context within which such justifications can be reexamined and, perhaps, found wanting.

Seneca's Phoenissae

Introduction and Commentary

Author: M. Frank

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page:

View: 443

The introduction tackles knotty problems: the structure and unity of the work, Seneca's literary purpose and treatment of the Theban legend, the absence of an ending and of choral lyrics, staging difficulties, etc. The commentary, primarily a literary analysis of the text, also elucidates textual, metrical, and grammatical problems.

The Gorgon's Severed Head

Studies in Alcestis, Electra and Phoenissae

Author: Cecelia Eaton Luschnig

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 271

View: 408

The book provides interpretations of three plays of Euripides in the areas of generic innovation, representation of women, and the use of the traditional stories.

Brill's Companion to the Reception of Euripides

Author:

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 679

View: 691

Brill's Companion to the Reception of Euripides offers a comprehensive account of the reception of Euripides’ plays over the centuries, across cultures and within a range of different fields, such as literature, intellectual history, visual arts, music, dance, stage and cinema.

Brill's Companion to Euripides (2 vols)

Author: Andreas Markantonatos

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 1228

View: 559

Brill’s Companion to Euripides, as well as presenting a comprehensive and authoritative guide to understanding Euripides and his masterworks, provides scholars and students with compelling fresh perspectives upon a broad range of issues in the field of Euripidean studies.

Euripides and the Language of Craft

Author: Mary C. Stieber

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 520

View: 378

This first in-depth account of Euripides' relationship with the visual arts demonstrates how frequently the tragedian used language to visual effect, whether through allusion or actual references to objects, motifs built around real or imaginary objects, or the use of technical terminology.

Orestes and Other Plays

Author: Euripides,

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN:

Category: Drama

Page: 288

View: 836

This is the fourth volume of Euripides plays in new translation. The four plays it contains, Ion, Orestes, The Phoenician Women and The Suppliant Women, explore ethical and political themes, contrasting the claims of patriotism with family loyalty, pragmatism with justice, the idea that 'might is right' with the ideal of clemency.