The Collected Stories of Eudora Welty

Author: Eudora Welty

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 640

View: 172

This complete collection includes all the published stories of Eudora Welty. There are forty-one stories in all, including the earlier collections A Curtain of Green, The Wide Net, The Golden Apples, and The Bride of the Innisfallen, as well as previously uncollected stories. With a Preface written by the Author especially for this edition.

Eudora Welty

The Contemporary Reviews

Author: Pearl Amelia McHaney

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 420

View: 256

Pulitzer Prize-winning author Eudora Welty's writing and photography were the subject of more than one thousand reviews, of which over two hundred are collected here. From the first, reviewers loved Welty's language and disparaged her lack of plot. Their eager anticipation for the next book is rarely diminished by the shock of reading entirely different styles of writing. Her work was admired even as it challenged its readers. The reviews selected for reprinting here represent the diversity of Welty's reception and assessment. Reviews from small towns, urban centers, noted fiction writers, professional reviewers, academics, and everyday readers are included. The comments of reviewing rivals such as the New York Times and the New York Herald Tribune, Nation and New Yorker, when read side by side, reveal the nuances both of the reviewers and of the work of this important Southern writer.

Eudora Welty

A Biography

Author: Suzanne Marrs

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 672

View: 443

Eudora Welty's works are treasures of American literature. When her first short-story collection was published in 1941, it heralded the arrival of a genuinely original writer who over the decades wrote hugely popular novels, novellas, essays, and a memoir, One Writer's Beginnings, that became a national bestseller. By the end of her life, Welty (who died in 2001) had been given nearly every literary award there was and was all but shrouded in admiration. In this definitive and authoritative account, Suzanne Marrs restores Welty's story to human proportions, tracing Welty's life from her roots in Jackson, Mississippi, to her rise to international stature. Making generous use of Welty's correspondence-particularly with contemporaries and admirers, including Katherine Anne Porter, E. M. Forster, and Elizabeth Bowen-Marrs has provided a fitting and fascinating tribute to one of the finest writers of the twentieth century.

The Late Novels of Eudora Welty

Author: Jan Nordby Gretlund

Publisher: Univ of South Carolina Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 200

View: 960

The Late Novels of Eudora Welty offers readings of two of the works considered to be Welty's most exciting both in innovative technique and postmodern existential statement. Fourteen new essays by internationally distinguished critics of Southern literature provide focused appraisals of Welty's last two novels: Losing Battles (1970), a provocative experiment in narration, and Pulitzer Prize-winning The Optimist's Daughter (1972), a profound comment on our time.

Eudora Welty's Delta Wedding

Author: Reine Dugas Bouton

Publisher: Rodopi

ISBN:

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 193

View: 933

Presenting the first full-length collection of essays on Eudora Welty's novel, Delta Wedding (1946), this volume is the fourth book in Rodopi Press'sDialogue Series. Within these pages, emerging and experienced literary critics engage in an exciting dialogue about Welty's noted novel, presenting a wide range of scholarship that focuses on feminist concerns, pays tribute to the rhetoric of exclusion and empowerment, examines the role of outsider and boundaries, explores meaning-making, and highlights the novel's humor and musicality. This volume will no doubt be of interest to Welty aficianados as well as southern studies and feminist scholars and to those who are interested in the craft of writing fiction.

Understanding Eudora Welty

Author: Michael Kreyling

Publisher: Univ of South Carolina Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 262

View: 902

Kreyling instead reveals the dynamic growth in the depth and complexity of Welty's vision and literary technique over the course of her career."--BOOK JACKET.

Conversations with Eudora Welty

Author: Eudora Welty

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 356

View: 809

In a series of interviews, Eudora Welty discusses her life in Mississippi, her literary career, and her novels and short stories

More Conversations with Eudora Welty

Author: Eudora Welty

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 304

View: 691

Collections of interviews with notable modern writers

Eudora Welty

Author: Harold Bloom

Publisher: Infobase Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 176

View: 403

Presents a biography and critical views of the works of Eudora Welty.

Eudora Welty

A Writer's Life

Author: Ann Waldron

Publisher: Anchor

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 432

View: 430

Eudora Welty is a beloved institution of Southern fiction and American literature, whose closely guarded privacy has prevented a full-scale study of her life and work--until now. A significant contribution to the world of letters, Ann Waldron's biography chronicles the history and achievements of one of our greatest living authors, from a Mississippi childhood to the sale of her first short story, from her literary friendships with Katherine Anne Porter and Elizabeth Bowen to her rivalry with Carson McCullers. Elegant and authoritative, this first biography to chart the life of a national treasure is a must-have for Welty fans and scholars everywhere.

Eudora Welty

The Contemporary Reviews

Author: Pearl Amelia McHaney

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page:

View: 882

Pulitzer Prize-winning author Eudora Welty's writing and photography were the subject of more than one thousand reviews, of which over two hundred are collected here. From the first, reviewers loved Welty's language and disparaged her lack of plot. Their eager anticipation for the next book is rarely diminished by the shock of reading entirely different styles of writing. Her work was admired even as it challenged its readers. The reviews selected for reprinting here represent the diversity of Welty's reception and assessment. Reviews from small towns, urban centers, noted fiction writers, professional reviewers, academics, and everyday readers are included. The comments of reviewing rivals such as the New York Times and the New York Herald Tribune, Nation and New Yorker, when read side by side, reveal the nuances both of the reviewers and of the work of this important Southern writer.

Eudora Welty

Thirteen Essays

Author: Peggy W. Prenshaw

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN:

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 262

View: 500

This collection of essays about the writings of Eudora Welty reflects a range of Welty criticism. Themes, forms, and stylistic features in her work are given careful consideration by some of the most notable scholars on her work: John Alexander Allen, J.A. Bryant, Jr., Daniel Curley, Julia L. Demmin, Albert J. Devlin, Chester E. Eisinger, Warren French, Seymour Gross, John Edward Hardy, Robert B. Heilman, Michael Kreyling, Barbara McKenzie, Daniele Pitavy-Souques, and Ruth M. Vande Kieft. This edition, selected from the twenty-seven essays published in 1979 as Eudora Welty: Critical Essays, retains the breadth of subject and approach that marked the earlier volume.

Eudora Welty as Photographer

Author: Pearl Amelia McHaney

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN:

Category: Photography

Page: 96

View: 215

A centennial consideration of the great author's vision as expressed in her renowned photography

Eudora Welty and Walker Percy

The Concept of Home in Their Lives and Literature

Author: Marion Montgomery

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 220

View: 668

Eudora Welty and Walker Percy were friends but very different writers, even though both were from the Deep South and intensely interested in the relation of place to their fiction. This work explores in each the concept of home and the importance of home to the homo viator ("man on his way"), and anti-idealism and anti-romanticism. The differences between Welty and Percy and in their fiction were revealed in the habits of their lives. Welty spent her life in Jackson, Mississippi, and was very much a member of the community. Percy was a wanderer who finally settled in Covington, Louisiana, because it was, as he called it, a "noplace." The author also asserts that Percy somewhat envied Welty and her stability in Jackson, and that for him, place was such a nagging concern that it became a personal problem to him as homo viator.

Eudora Welty

Author:

Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 183

View: 841

Eudora Welty and Surrealism

Author: Stephen M. Fuller

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 267

View: 298

Eudora Welty and Surrealism surveys Welty’s fiction during the most productive period of her long writing life. The study shows how the 1930s witnessed surrealism’s arrival in the United States largely through the products of its visual artists. Welty, a frequent traveler to New York City, where the surrealists exhibited, and a keen reader of magazines and newspapers that disseminated their work, absorbed and unconsciously appropriated surrealism’s perspective in her writing. In fact, Welty’s first solo exhibition of her photographs in 1936 took place next door to New York’s premier venue for surrealist art. In a series of readings that collectively examine A Curtain of Green and Other Stories, The Wide Net and Other Stories, Delta Wedding, The Golden Apples, and The Bride of the Innisfallen and Other Stories, the book reveals how surrealism profoundly shaped Welty’s striking figurative literature. Yet the influence of the surrealist movement extends beyond questions of style. The study’s interpretations also foreground how her writing refracted surrealism as a historical phenomenon. Scattered throughout her stories are allusions to personalities allied with the movement in the United States, including figures such as Salvador Dalí, Elsa Schiaparelli, Caresse Crosby, Wallace Simpson, Cecil Beaton, Helena Rubinstein, Elizabeth Arden, Joseph Cornell, and Charles Henri Ford. Individuals such as these and others whom surrealism seduced often lead unorthodox and controversial lives that made them natural targets for moral opprobrium. Eschewing such parochialism, Welty borrowed the idiom of surrealism to develop modernized depictions of the South, a literary strategy that revealed not only cultural farsightedness but great artistic daring.

Eudora Welty, Whiteness, and Race

Author: Harriet Pollack

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 288

View: 720

Faced with Eudora Welty's preference for the oblique in literary performances, some have assumed that Welty was not concerned with issues of race, or even that she was perhaps ambivalent toward racism. This collection counters those assumptions as it examines Welty's handling of race, the color line, and Jim Crow segregation and sheds new light on her views about the patterns, insensitivities, blindness, and atrocities of whiteness. Contributors to this volume show that Welty addressed whiteness and race in her earliest stories, her photography, and her first novel, Delta Wedding. In subsequent work, including The Golden Apples, The Optimist's Daughter, and her memoir, One Writer's Beginnings, she made the color line and white privilege visible, revealing the gaping distances between lives lived in shared space but separated by social hierarchy and segregation. Even when black characters hover in the margins of her fiction, they point readers toward complex lives, and the black body is itself full of meaning in her work. Several essays suggest that Welty represented race, like gender and power, as a performance scripted by whiteness. Her black characters in particular recognize whiteface and blackface as performances, especially comical when white characters are unaware of their role play. Eudora Welty, Whiteness, and Race also makes clear that Welty recognized white material advantage and black economic deprivation as part of a cycle of race and poverty in America and that she connected this history to lives on either side of the color line, to relationships across it, and to an uneasy hierarchy of white classes within the presumed monolith of whiteness. Contributors: Mae Miller Claxton, Susan V. Donaldson, Julia Eichelberger, Sarah Ford, Jean C. Griffith, Rebecca Mark, Suzanne Marrs, Donnie McMahand, David McWhirter, Harriet Pollack, Keri Watson, Patricia Yaeger.

New Essays on Eudora Welty, Class, and Race

Author: Harriet Pollack

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 246

View: 552

Contributions by Jacob Agner, Susan V. Donaldson, Sarah Gilbreath Ford, Stephen M. Fuller, Jean C. Griffith, Ebony Lumumba, Rebecca Mark, Donnie McMahand, Kevin Murphy, Harriet Pollack, Christin Marie Taylor, Annette Trefzer, and Adrienne Akins Warfield The year 2013 saw the publication of Eudora Welty, Whiteness, and Race, a collection in which twelve critics changed the conversation on Welty’s fiction and photography by mining and deciphering the complexity of her responses to the Jim Crow South. The thirteen diverse voices in New Essays on Eudora Welty, Class, and Race deepen, reflect on, and respond to those seminal discussions. These essays freshly consider such topics as Welty’s uses of African American signifying in her short stories and her attention to public street performances interacting with Jim Crow rules in her unpublished photographs. Contributors discuss her adaptations of gothic plots, haunted houses, Civil War stories, and film noir. And they frame Welty’s work with such subjects as Bob Dylan’s songwriting, the idea and history of the orphan in America, and standup comedy. They compare her handling of whiteness and race to other works by such contemporary writers as William Faulkner, Richard Wright, Toni Morrison, Chester Himes, and Alice Walker. Discussions of race and class here also bring her masterwork The Golden Apples and her novel Losing Battles, underrepresented in earlier conversations, into new focus. Moreover, as a group these essays provide insight into Welty as an innovative craftswoman and modernist technician, busily altering literary form with her frequent, pointed makeovers of familiar story patterns, plots, and genres.