Essex Institute Historical Collections

Author: Essex Institute

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Page: 350

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This is a reproduction of the original artefact. Generally these books are created from careful scans of the original. This allows us to preserve the book accurately and present it in the way the author intended. Since the original versions are generally quite old, there may occasionally be certain imperfections within these reproductions. We're happy to make these classics available again for future generations to enjoy!

The Essex Institute Historical Collections (Volume Xliii) 1907

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Page: 408

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This book has been considered by academicians and scholars of great significance and value to literature. This forms a part of the knowledge base for future generations. So that the book is never forgotten we have represented this book in a print format as the same form as it was originally first published. Hence any marks or annotations seen are left intentionally to preserve its true nature.

The Essex Institute Historical Collections (Volume Xlvi) 1910

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Page: 436

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This book has been considered by academicians and scholars of great significance and value to literature. This forms a part of the knowledge base for future generations. So that the book is never forgotten we have represented this book in a print format as the same form as it was originally first published. Hence any marks or annotations seen are left intentionally to preserve its true nature.

Essex Institute Historical Collections (Volume XLIX) 1913

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Page: 430

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This book has been considered by academicians and scholars of great significance and value to literature. This forms a part of the knowledge base for future generations. So that the book is never forgotten we have represented this book in a print format as the same form as it was originally first published. Hence any marks or annotations seen are left intentionally to preserve its true nature.

Essex Institute Historical Collections; Volume 38

Author: Essex Institute

Publisher: Wentworth Press

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Page: 484

View: 171

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

The Essex Institute Historical Collections, 1913, Vol. 49 (Classic Reprint)

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Publisher: Forgotten Books

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Category: Reference

Page: 428

View: 640

Excerpt from The Essex Institute Historical Collections, 1913, Vol. 49 Mar. 1. Went to Cambridge with Joseph. Harry Appleton is returned from Sea, and I saw him at Pick man's Chamber. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

The Essex Institute Historical Collections, 1927, Vol. 63

Issued Quarterly (Classic Reprint)

Author: Essex Institute

Publisher: Forgotten Books

ISBN:

Category: Reference

Page: 480

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Excerpt from The Essex Institute Historical Collections, 1927, Vol. 63: Issued Quarterly On the other hand, some approved the policy of giving bounties. One writes, The returns to Great Britain have far exceeded any expense from the support of colonies. Bounties have been often given but for the purpose chiefly of freeing England from dependence upon foreign nations. The savings have exceeded the bounties.9 Another, Every advantage accruing to the colonies by their connec tion with the mother country is amply, dearly paid for, by the benefits derived to her from them - Those benefits have been allowed by the best writers to be immense and consist in the various employment and the support they afi'ord her people.' 0 These quotations Show, however, that the bounties were given as a farmer feeds his turkeys in October, - that they may weigh more at Thanksgiving. The colonies were helped that they might give England more in return. Between the liberals who would let America get rich as best she could and the restrictionists who would first try to make England rich and then attempt to force America to grow rich in the manner they thought best, was a mid dle class who would let the colonists conduct any trade until they competed directly with England; who might pass severe laws and permit a judicious violation of the same. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

Essex Institute Historical Collections, 1874, Vol. 12 (Classic Reprint)

Author: Essex Institute

Publisher: Forgotten Books

ISBN:

Category: Reference

Page: 318

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Excerpt from Essex Institute Historical Collections, 1874, Vol. 12 The Journal of the Rev. John Cleaveland, by N. Cleaveland (continued), The One Hundredth Anniversary of the Destruction of Tea in Boston Harbor, communicated by james kimball, Inscriptions from the burial-grounds of Marblehead, Mass., collected by perley derby (continued. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

The Essex Institute Historical Collections, 1909, Vol. 45 (Classic Reprint)

Author: Essex Institute

Publisher: Forgotten Books

ISBN:

Category: Reference

Page: 408

View: 445

Excerpt from The Essex Institute Historical Collections, 1909, Vol. 45 The story of the American War of Independence has been told many times. Its important diplomatic events and great battles are recorded in every school history of the nation and its famous statesmen and military heroes are well known. Historians have preserved in much de tail the exploits of the Continental Army, but concerning the operations of the Americans upon the sea, during the Revolution, they seem to have known and certainly to have said but very little. With the exception of John Paul Jones the name of no American naval hero of the Revolu tion is familiar today, although it is safe to say that but for the energy and enterprise of the Continental seamen the result of the Revolution would have been far different. Without doubt the reason for this neglect 'on the part of historians is due to the fact that our early naval records are far from complete, and thus a certain veil of mystery shrouds our sailor heroes. Many important engagements and captures took place of which we know little or noth ing, for the larger number of our fighting craft were priv ateers and their exploits are not to be found in the nava archives. It is this very lack of definite facts together with the romance that always surrounds tales of rich prizes, daring adventures, and crews armed to the teeth. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.