Epistemic Injustice

Power and the Ethics of Knowing

Author: Miranda Fricker

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 188

View: 549

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Overcoming Epistemic Injustice

Social and Psychological Perspectives

Author: Benjamin R. Sherman

Publisher: Collective Studies in Knowledge and Society

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 334

View: 110

This volume draws together cutting edge research from the social sciences to find ways of overcoming the unconscious prejusice that is present in our everyday decisions, a phenomenon coined by the philosopher Miranda Fricker as 'epistemic injustice'.

The Routledge Handbook of Epistemic Injustice

Author: Ian James Kidd

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 438

View: 875

In the era of information and communication, issues of misinformation and miscommunication are more pressing than ever. Epistemic injustice - one of the most important and ground-breaking subjects to have emerged in philosophy in recent years - refers to those forms of unfair treatment that relate to issues of knowledge, understanding, and participation in communicative practices. The Routledge Handbook of Epistemic Injustice is an outstanding reference source to the key topics, problems and debates in this exciting subject. The first collection of its kind, it comprises over thirty chapters by a team of international contributors, divided into five parts: Core Concepts Liberatory Epistemologies and Axes of Oppression Schools of Thought and Subfields within Epistemology Socio-political, Ethical, and Psychological Dimensions of Knowing Case Studies of Epistemic Injustice. As well as fundamental topics such as testimonial and hermeneutic injustice and epistemic trust, the Handbook includes chapters on important issues such as social and virtue epistemology, objectivity and objectification, implicit bias, and gender and race. Also included are chapters on areas in applied ethics and philosophy, such as law, education, and healthcare. The Routledge Handbook of Epistemic Injustice is essential reading for students and researchers in ethics, epistemology, political philosophy, feminist theory, and philosophy of race. It will also be very useful for those in related fields, such as cultural studies, sociology, education and law.

Epistemic Injustice

Understanding Across Difference

Author: Marisa Laila Webster

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 250

View: 300

ABSTRACT: Miranda Fricker argues that powerless social groups may be subject to a unique form of injustice: hermeneutical injustice. On her account, deficiencies in the shared tools of interpretation may render the experiences of powerless social groups (for instance, women prior to the era of second wave feminism) both incomprehensible and incommunicable. In this thesis, I argue that Fricker has mischaracterized hermeneutical injustice and the silence of marginalized social groups: rather than lacking understanding, powerless groups are often denied rational authority with respect to their own social experiences or choose to self-silence. For this reason, I argue that many of the cases of hermeneutical injustice offered by Fricker collapse into cases of testimonial injustice. This mischaracterization has led Fricker to propose solutions to hermeneutical injustice that are inadequate; in response, I offer a solution that prescribes self-reflexive awareness of the ways that power and privilege shape our interpretive frameworks.

Wagadu Volume 15

Epistemic Injustice in Practice

Author: Franziska Dübgen

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 180

View: 487

Epistemic injustice points to experiences that we struggle to articulate due to the injuries of hegemonic speech. Detecting such injuries enables social philosophers and activists alike to name injustices, which have not been previously addressed as such. By looking at epistemic injustice in practice, this special issue seeks to analyze epistemologies of marginalized groups, pointing to hidden practices of power as well as silenced subject positions. The published articles investigate the workings of epistemic injustice in the fields of transgender identities, racial discrimination, legal mechanisms of retribution, disability, global social inequalities, and in theorizing justice.

The Epistemology of Resistance

Gender and Racial Oppression, Epistemic Injustice, and the Social Imagination

Author: José Medina

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 332

View: 161

This book explores the epistemic side of oppression, focusing on racial and sexual oppression and their interconnections. It elucidates how social insensitivities and imposed silences prevent members of different groups from interacting epistemically in fruitful ways-from listening to each other, learning from each other, and mutually enriching each other's perspectives. Medina's epistemology of resistance offers a contextualist theory of our complicity with epistemic injustices and a social connection model of shared responsibility for improving epistemic conditions of participation in social practices. Through the articulation of a new interactionism and polyphonic contextualism, the book develops a sustained argument about the role of the imagination in mediating social perceptions and interactions. It concludes that only through the cultivation of practices of resistance can we develop a social imagination that can help us become sensitive to the suffering of excluded and stigmatized subjects. Drawing on Feminist Standpoint Theory and Critical Race Theory, this book makes contributions to social epistemology and to recent discussions of testimonial and hermeneutical injustice, epistemic responsibility, counter-performativity, and solidarity in the fight against racism and sexism.

Overcoming the Epistemic Injustice of Colonialism

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 644

Abstract: In this article I consider the epistemic injustice of colonialism. I define epistemic injustice as a form of cultural injustice that occurs when the concepts and categories by which a people understand themselves and their world is replaced or adversely affected by the concepts and categories of the colonizers. A deep problem today for the sufferers of epistemic injustice is that western categories both have an undeniable universal potential and they are fully intermingled with the specificity of western practices; worse, they bear a deep imprint of western domination and hegemony. I thus argue that we can neither ignore western ideas nor fully show how they can be rescued from the pernicious effects of their own imperial imprint. Abstract : A deep problem today for the sufferers of epistemic injustice is that Western categories have both an undeniable universal potential and that they are fully intermingled with the specificity of Western practices, and worse, possess a deep imprint of Western domination and hegemony.

Vulnerability of Individuals With Mental Disorders to Epistemic Injustice in Both Clinical and Social Domains

Author:

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View: 856

Abstract : Many individuals who have mental disorders often report negative experiences of a distinctively epistemic sort, such as not being listened to, not being taken seriously, or not being considered credible because of their psychiatric conditions. In an attempt to articulate and interpret these reports we present Fricker's concepts of epistemic injustice (Fricker, 2007, p. 1) and then focus on testimonial injustice and hermeneutic injustice as it applies to individuals with mental disorders. The clinical impact of these concepts on quality of care is discussed. Within the clinical domain, we contrast epistemic injustice with epistemic privilege and authority. We then argue that testimonial and hermeneutic injustices also affect individuals with mental disorders not only when communicating with their caregivers but also in the social context as they attempt to reintegrate into the general society and assume responsibilities as productive citizens. Following the trend of the movement of mental health care to the community, the testimonies of people with mental disorders should not be restricted to issues involving their own personal mental states.