Encyclopedia of Latin American Popular Music

Author: George Torres

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 484

View: 401

This comprehensive survey examines Latin American music, focusing on popular—as opposed to folk or art—music and containing more than 200 entries on the concepts and terminology, ensembles, and instruments that the genre comprises. • Roughly 200 entries on concepts and terminology, ensembles, genres, and instruments • 37 biographical sidebars of significant musicians and performers • A chronology for Latin American popular music

Pop Culture in Latin America and the Caribbean

Author: Elizabeth Gackstetter Nichols Ph.D.

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 402

View: 372

This insightful book introduces the most important trends, people, events, and products of popular culture in Latin America and the Caribbean. • Explores controversial issues like censorship, gender, cultural imperialism, and globalization • Allows for cross-cultural comparisons between Latin America, the Caribbean, and the United States • Enables quick access to areas of interest through well-organized entries and helpful topic introductions • Features a discussion on the influence of modern technologies—the Internet, social media, and video games—in Latin American cultures • Provides substantial citations and references on each element of popular culture

Encyclopedia of Contemporary Latin American and Caribbean Cultures

Author: Daniel Balderston

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Reference

Page: 1800

View: 619

This vast three-volume Encyclopedia offers more than 4000 entries on all aspects of the dynamic and exciting contemporary cultures of Latin America and the Caribbean. Its coverage is unparalleled with more than 40 regions discussed and a time-span of 1920 to the present day. "Culture" is broadly defined to include food, sport, religion, television, transport, alongside architecture, dance, film, literature, music and sculpture. The international team of contributors include many who are based in Latin America and the Caribbean making this the most essential, authoritative and authentic Encyclopedia for anyone studying Latin American and Caribbean studies. Key features include: * over 4000 entries ranging from extensive overview entries which provide context for general issues to shorter, factual or biographical pieces * articles followed by bibliographic references which offer a starting point for further research * extensive cross-referencing and thematic and regional contents lists direct users to relevant articles and help map a route through the entries * a comprehensive index provides further guidance.

Historical Dictionary of Popular Music

Author: Norman Abjorensen

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 694

View: 145

The Historical Dictionary of Popular Music contains a chronology, an introduction, an appendix, and an extensive bibliography. The dictionary section has over 1000 cross-referenced entries on major figures across genres, definitions of genres, technical innovations and surveys of countries and regions.

Continuum Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World Part 2 Locations (5 Vol Set)

Volumes III to VII

Author: John Shepherd

Publisher: Bloomsbury Academic

ISBN:

Category: Reference

Page: 1824

View: 975

"EPMOW lives music. Put another way, it does for popular music what Grove has done for classical" David Brackett ‘Excellent, readable and thoroughly useful...While some previous single-volume and multivolume works have addressed the development and current state of popular music, none has done so with this work's depth of scholarship and global reach. Scholarly, clearly written, and well indexed, it is an ideal reference set.' Library Journal Continuum Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World's five-volume work ‘Locations' is the most authoritative reference work on the history and current practice of popular music ever published. The five volumes on ‘Locations' that form Part 2 of this multi-volume work follow on from the two volumes of Part 1: Media, Industry and Society (Volume I) and Performance and Production (Volume II) . They cover over 200 nation states and are organized according to continental regions: Volume III: Caribbean and Latin America Volume IV: North America Volume V: Asia and Oceania Volume VI: Africa and the Middle East Volume VII: Europe Each discusses the history, development and current practice of popular music in cities, districts, cross-border regions, nation states and diasporic communities around the world. Includes coverage of:- The historical, geographical, demographical, political, economic and cultural context- Genres for which the location is known or which have been important to the development and current practice of its popular music- Significant venues such as theatres, dance halls, clubs and bars- The role of the industry: music publishers, record companies/labels, recording studios, radio and TV- The role of the state and government regulatory bodies- The teaching and research of popular music in educational institutions- Songs associated with the location- Notable performers and other practitioners such as producers, engineers, technological innovators, record company heads, journalists, critics and scholars, songwriters, composers and lyricists. 250 leading popular music scholars and practitioners have contributed over 500 entries. They include Rafael José de Menezes Bastos on Brazil, Peter Manuel on India and the Caribbean Islands, John Collins on Ghana, Moya Aliya Malamusi on Malawi, Tôru Mitsui on Japan, Motti Regev on Israel, Martin Stokes on Turkey, Richard Peterson on Nashville, Amy Ku'uleialoha Stillman on Hawai'I, Bruce Johnson on Australia, Paolo Prato on Italy, Svanibor Pettan on Croatia and Alf Björnberg on Sweden. For more information please visit: www.continuumpopmusic.com

A Latin American Music Reader

Views from the South

Author: Javier F Leon

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 496

View: 326

Javier F. León and Helena Simonett curate a collection of essential writings from the last twenty-five years of Latin American music studies. Chosen as representative, outstanding, and influential in the field, each article appears in English translation. A detailed new introduction by León and Simonett both surveys and contextualizes the history of Latin American ethnomusicology, opening the door for readers energized by the musical forms brought and nurtured by immigrants from throughout Latin America. Contributors: Marina Alonso Bolaños, José Jorge de Carvalho, Maria Ignêz Cruz Mello, Gonzalo Camacho Díaz, Claudio F. Díaz, Rodrigo Cantos Savelli Gomes, Juan Pablo González, Javier F. León, Rubén López Cano, Angela Lühning, Jorge Martínez Ulloa, Julio Mendívil, Carlos Miñana Blasco, Raúl R. Romero, Iñigo Sánchez Fuarros, Carlos Sandroni, Carolina Santamaría Delgado, Helena Simonett, Rodrigo Torres Alvarado, and Alejandro Vera.

Designed for Dancing

How Midcentury Records Taught America to Dance

Author: Janet Borgerson

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN:

Category: Design

Page: 552

View: 720

When Americans mamboed in the kitchen, waltzed in the living room, polkaed in the pavilion, and tangoed at the club; with glorious, full-color record cover art. In midcentury America, eager dancers mamboed in the kitchen, waltzed in the living room, Watusied at the nightclub, and polkaed in the pavilion, instructed (and inspired) by dance records. Glorious, full-color record covers encouraged them: Let’s Cha Cha Cha, Dance and Stay Young, Dancing in the Street!, Limbo Party, High Society Twist. In Designed for Dancing, vinyl record aficionados and collectors Janet Borgerson and Jonathan Schroeder examine dance records of the 1950s and 1960s as expressions of midcentury culture, identity, fantasy, and desire. Borgerson and Schroeder begin with the record covers—memorable and striking, but largely designed and created by now-forgotten photographers, scenographers, and illustrators—which were central to the way records were conceived, produced, and promoted. Dancing allowed people to sample aspirational lifestyles, whether at the Plaza or in a smoky Parisian café, and to affirm ancestral identities with Irish, Polish, or Greek folk dancing. Dance records featuring ethnic music of variable authenticity and appropriateness invited consumers to dance in the footsteps of the Other with “hot” Latin music, Afro-Caribbean rhythms, and Hawaiian hulas. Bought at a local supermarket, department store, or record shop, and listened to in the privacy of home, midcentury dance records offered instruction in how to dance, how to dress, how to date, and how to discover cool new music—lessons for harmonizing with the rest of postwar America.