Ecology and Literatures in English

Writing to Save the Planet

Author: Françoise Besson

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Nature

Page: 545

View: 934

In all latitudes, writers hold out a mirror, leading the reader to awareness by telling real or imaginary stories about people of good will who try to save what can be saved, and about animals showing humans the way to follow. Such tales argue that, in spite of all destructions and tragedies, if we are just aware of, and connected to, the real world around us, to the blade of grass at our feet and the star above our heads, there is hope in a reconciliation with the Earth. This may start with the emergence, or, rather, the return, of a nonverbal language, restoring the connection between human beings and the nonhuman world, through a form of communication beyond verbalization. Through a journey in Anglophone literature, with examples taken from Aboriginal, African, American, English, Canadian and Indian works, this book shows the role played by literature in the protection of the planet. It argues that literature reveals the fundamental idea that everything is connected and that it is only when most people are aware of this connection that the world will change. Exactly as a tree is connected with all the animal life in and around it, texts show that nothing should be separated. From Shakespeare’s theatre to ecopoetics, from travel writing to detective novels, from children’s books to novels, all literary genres show that literature responds to the violence destroying lands, men and nonhuman creatures, whose voices can be heard through texts.

An Ecology of World Literature

From Antiquity to the Present Day

Author: Alexander Beecroft

Publisher: Verso Books

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 320

View: 380

What constitutes a nation’s literature? How do literatures of different countries interact with one another? In this groundbreaking study, Alexander Beecroft develops a new way of thinking about world literature. Drawing on a series of examples and case studies, the book ranges from ancient epic to the contemporary fiction of Roberto Bolaño and Amitav Ghosh. Moving across literary ecologies of varying sizes, from small societies to the planet as a whole, the environments in which literary texts are produced and circulated, An Ecology of World Literature places in dialogue scholarly perspectives on ancient and modern, western and non-western texts, navigating literary study into new and uncharted territory.

The Ecology of the English Outlaw in Medieval Literature

From Fen to Greenwood

Author: Sarah Harlan-Haughey

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 241

View: 992

Arguing that outlaw narratives become particularly popular and poignant at moments of national ecological and political crisis, Sarah Harlan-Haughey examines the figure of the outlaw in Anglo-Saxon poetry and Old English exile lyrics such as Beowulf, works dealing with the life and actions of Hereward, the Anglo-Norman romance of Fulk Fitz Waryn, the Robin Hood ballads, and the Tale of Gamelyn. Although the outlaw's wilderness shelter changed dramatically from the menacing fens and forests of Anglo-Saxon England to the bright, known, and mapped greenwood of the late outlaw romances and ballads, Harlan-Haughey observes that the outlaw remained strongly animalistic, other, and liminal. His brutality points to a deep literary ambivalence towards wilderness and the animal, at the same time that figures such as the Anglo-Saxon resistance fighter Hereward, the brutal yet courtly Gamelyn, and Robin Hood often represent a lost England imagined as pristine and forested. In analyzing outlaw literature as a form of nature writing, Harlan-Haughey suggests that it often reveals more about medieval anxieties respecting humanity's place in nature than it does about the political realities of the period.

Ecology and Literature

Ecocentric Personification from Antiquity to the Twenty-first Century

Author: B. Moore

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 247

View: 557

Employing a groundbreaking rhetorical and ecocritical approach, this volume advances personification/anthropomorphism as a means of representing the natural world and arguing for its worth outside of human use.

The Ecological Modernisation Reader

Environmental Reform in Theory and Practice

Author: Arthur P.J. Mol

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 542

View: 400

Structural environmental reform by firms and industries, governmental and intergovernmental agencies, non-governmental organisations (NGOs), and others is a worldwide phenomenon and the focus of this definitive collection. Includes a comprehensive introduction to and overview of Ecological Modernisation Theory; original, state-of-the-art review essays by distinguished international scholars; a selection of the best published works and debates from a quarter-century of related social science scholarship; an emphasis on environmental issues in Asian and other emerging economies; and an agenda for continued scholarship, policymaking, and practice. Accessible to students, policymakers, professionals, executives, and others interested in deeply understanding contemporary environmental issues and taking effective action for environmental solutions. Rigorous and sophisticated for use in graduate and advanced studies. Appropriate for courses in Sociology, Political Science, Policy Studies, Geography, Environmental Studies, Environmental Planning, Business, Economics, Asian Studies, Development Studies, and other fields.

Literature as Cultural Ecology

Sustainable Texts

Author: Hubert Zapf

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 288

View: 605

Drawing on the latest debates in ecocritical theory and sustainability studies, Literature as Cultural Ecology: Sustainable Texts outlines a new approach to the reading of literary texts. Hubert Zapf considers the ways in which literature operates as a form of cultural ecology, using language, imagination and critique to challenge and transform cultural narratives of humanity's relationship to nature. In this way, the book demonstrates the important role that literature plays in creating a more sustainable way of life. Applying this approach to works by writers such as Emily Dickinson, Edgar Allan Poe, Herman Melville, William Faulkner, Toni Morrison, Zakes Mda, and Amitav Ghosh, Literature as Cultural Ecology is an essential contribution to the contemporary environmental humanities.

Ecological Literature and the Critique of Anthropocentrism

Author: Bryan L. Moore

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 273

View: 898

This book is an analysis of literary texts that question, critique, or subvert anthropocentrism, the notion that the universe and everything in it exists for humans. Bryan Moore examines ancient Greek and Roman texts; medieval to twentieth-century European texts; eighteenth-century French philosophy; early to contemporary American texts and poetry; and science fiction to demonstrate a historical basis for the questioning of anthropocentrism and contemplation of responsible environmental stewardship in the twenty-first century and beyond. Ecological Literature and the Critique of Anthropocentrism is essential reading for ecocritics and ecofeminists. It will also be useful for researchers interested in the relationship between science and literature, environmental philosophy, and literature in general.

British Qualifications

A Complete Guide to Educational, Technical, Professional and Academic Qualifications in Britain

Author: Kogan Page

Publisher: Kogan Page Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Degrees, Academic

Page: 942

View: 760

In a single volume, the new edition of this guide gives comprehensive coverage of the developments within the fast-changing field of professional, academic and vocational qualifications.;Fully indexed, it provides details on all university awards and over 200 career fields, their professional and accrediting bodies, levels of membership and qualifications, and is a one-stop guide for careers advisors, students and parents. It should also enable human resource managers to verify the qualifications of potential employees.

Ecology and the Literature of the British Left

The Red and the Green

Author: H. Gustav Klaus

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 316

View: 928

Premised on the belief that a social and an ecological agenda are compatible, this collection offers readings in the ecology of left and radical writing from the Romantic period to the present. While early ecocriticism tended to elide the bitter divisions within and between societies, recent practitioners of ecofeminism, environmental justice, and social ecology have argued that the social, the economic and the environmental have to be seen as part of the same process. Taking up this challenge, the contributors trace the origins of an environmental sensibility and of the modern left to their roots in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, charting the ways in which the literary imagination responds to the political, industrial and agrarian revolutions. Topics include Samuel Taylor Coleridge's credentials as a green writer, the interaction between John Ruskin's religious and political ideas and his changing view of nature, William Morris and the Garden City movement, H. G. Wells and the Fabians, the devastated landscapes in the poetry and fiction of the First World War, and the leftist pastoral poetry of the 1930s. In historicizing and connecting environmentally sensitive literature with socialist thought, these essays explore the interactive vision of nature and society in the work of writers ranging from William Wordsworth and John Clare to John Berger and John Burnside.

National Character in South African English Children's Literature

Author: Elwyn Jenkins

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 240

View: 974

This is the first full-length study of South African English youth literature to cover the entire period of its publication, from the late nineteenth century to the early twenty-first century. Jenkins' book focuses on what made the subsequent literature essentially South African and what aspects of the country and its society authors concentrated on. What gives this book particular strength is its coverage of literature up to the 1960s, which has until now received almost no scholarly attention. Not only is this earlier literature a rewarding subject for study in itself, but it also throws light on subsequent literary developments. Another exceptional feature is that the book follows the author’s previous work in placing children’s literature in the context of adult South African literature and South African cultural history (e.g. cinema). He also makes enlightening comparisons with American, Canadian and Australian children’s literature.