East Liverpool

Author: Cathy Hester Seckman

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 797

Once known as the "Pottery Capital of the World," East Liverpool boasted some 300 potteries in its heyday, along with many ancillary industries. When British immigrant Thomas Bennett found promising clay deposits along the riverfront, he opened the city's first one-kiln pottery in 1839. From that humble beginning, the industry burgeoned, eventually spreading up the hills and across the river. Besides sturdy kitchenware, hotel china, toilet ware, and ceramic doorknobs and insulators, the potteries produced such elegant designs as Lotus Ware, Lu-Ray, and Fiesta Ware. The men, women, and children who worked in the potteries also built a town with a busy and complex social life. Churches, schools, cultural and service organizations, theaters, and restaurants filled the downtown area. East Liverpool struggled after the collapse of the pottery industry in the second half of the 20th century but has persevered into the 21st century with hope for the future.

The Grove Encyclopedia of American Art

Author: Joan M. Marter

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 2608

View: 365

Where is American art in the new millennium? At the heart of all cultural developments is diversity. Access through recent technology engenders interaction with artists from around the world. The visual arts in the United States are bold and pulsating with new ideas.

Handbook of Community Movements and Local Organizations

Author: Ram A. Cnaan

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 436

View: 641

Although the way associations and the organization of local social life are intertwined is one of the oldest approaches to community study, the way citizens and residents come together informally to act and solve problems has rarely been a primary focus. Associations are central to important and developing areas of social theory and social action. This handbook takes voluntary associations as the starting point for making sense of communities. It offers a new perspective on voluntary organizations and gives an integrated, yet diverse, theoretical understanding of this important aspect of community life.

The American Midwest

An Interpretive Encyclopedia

Author: Andrew R. L. Cayton

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 1916

View: 633

This first-ever encyclopedia of the Midwest seeks to embrace this large and diverse area, to give it voice, and help define its distinctive character. Organized by topic, it encourages readers to reflect upon the region as a whole. Each section moves from the general to the specific, covering broad themes in longer introductory essays, filling in the details in the shorter entries that follow. There are portraits of each of the region's twelve states, followed by entries on society and culture, community and social life, economy and technology, and public life. The book offers a wealth of information about the region's surprising ethnic diversity -- a vast array of foods, languages, styles, religions, and customs -- plus well-informed essays on the region's history, culture and values, and conflicts. A site of ideas and innovations, reforms and revivals, and social and physical extremes, the Midwest emerges as a place of great complexity, signal importance, and continual fascination.

Salem, Ohio

Author: Dale E. Shaffer

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 941

With more than 230 historic photographs, Salem, Ohio provides an excellent visual image of what the past was like in a little Quaker town called Salem. Covering the time period from 1850 to 1956, this book offers a glimpse of the downtown of yesteryear, with photos of the old buildings, businesses, trolley cars, and homes. The people of Salem are also shown as they looked, worked, and played in earlier times. Every photo in Salem, Ohio is a conversation piece with a unique story to tell, which represents a small part of the city's history. Salem has always been seen as a quiet, traditional, and peaceful city--largely because it was founded by Quakers. In fact, the name Salem, which comes from the word "Jerusalem," literally means "City of Peace." The city has many claims to fame, including its active role in the Underground Railroad and the Anti-Slavery Movement. Salem was also the site of Ohio's first Women's Suffrage Convention in 1850. Salem has long been the industrial manufacturing center of the area, providing jobs for thousands of workers from miles around. Product names like Mullins, Deming, Silver, Eljer, American Standard, and Bliss have been an important part of both the Salem and world economies for many years.

Weirdo World

Author: Cathy Seckman

Publisher: CreateSpace

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 156

View: 756

When lightning strikes, you never know where you'll end up . . . or when. They say it's rare for a person to survive a lightning strike, but that's exactly what happened when Hunter shoved a time card into an antique punch clock. Not only did he survive the hit, he was sent back in time to 1963. Hunter finds himself trapped in a strange new place, where computers and cell phones don't exist, people don't realize that cigarettes will kill you, and Tarzan is the biggest superhero. Hunter's new friends in weirdo world, Bobby, Eddie, Davey, and Roy, agree to let him hide out in their treehouse, teach him to ride an actual bicycle, and get him to join their pickup baseball team. The only hitch to his new life is that he misses his home. Hunter must convince the guys that he really is from the year 2010 before they'll help him figure out a way to get home.

Ohio Valley Pottery Towns

Author: Pamela Lee Gray

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Antiques & Collectibles

Page: 128

View: 194

The Land Act of 1796 opened the gates for a flood of settlers into the lands of the Upper Ohio River Valley. The natural clay soils of the valley, coupled with an abundance of salt for glazing and the Ohio River as a nearby source for transportation, laid the foundation for what would become the pottery capital of the United States. Naming their new towns for those they left behind-Liverpool, Chester, Newell-English and Irish entrepreneurs established factories for making crockery. The industry boomed and, by the turn of the twentieth century, Ohio Valley pottery was being exported throughout the world. The story of pottery production is more than a list of manufacturers; the towns that grew around these factories and the lifestyles of the people who worked in them provide the social fabric of the Ohio Valley. From the early pioneer villages of the "hand-thrown" period to the towns with bustling shops and regular trolley service, residents built homes, schools, and churches, creating thriving communities.

Sebring, Ohio

Author: Craig S. Bara

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 931

The Sebring family came from the Netherlands and moved to Pennsylvania. George E. and Elizabeth Larkins Sebring eventually settled in East Liverpool, where they ran a grocery business and lived with their ten children. The Sebrings then decided to find property and build a pottery town, as they had been involved in potteries in East Liverpool and East Palestine. They settled on 200 acres of farmland near the Mahoning River, with the railroad running through the property. After a great deal of work in starting the new town, the Articles of Incorporation were filed in 1899. Potteries and homes were constructed, and Sebring became a flourishing town, at one point considered the pottery center of the world.

Atlas of Slavery

Author: James Walvin

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 160

View: 435

Slavery transformed Africa, Europe and the Americas and hugely-enhanced the well-being of the West but the subject of slavery can be hard to understand because of its huge geographic and chronological span. This book uses a unique atlas format to present the story of slavery, explaining its historical importance and making this complex story and its geographical setting easy to understand.

Victorian Prose

An Anthology

Author: Rosemary J. Mundhenk

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 504

View: 550

This engaging, informative collection of Victorian nonfiction prose juxtaposes classic texts and canonical writers with more obscure writings and authors in order to illuminate important debates in nineteenth-century Britain—inviting modern readers to see the age anew. The collection represents the voices of a broad scope of women and men on a range of nineteenth-century cultural issues and in various forms—from periodical essays to travel accounts, letters to lectures, and autobiographies to social surveys. With its fifty-six substantial selections, Victorian Prose reaches beyond the work of Carlyle, Newman, Mill, Arnold, and Ruskin to uncover an array of lesser-known voices of the era. Women writers are given full attention—writings by Mary Prince, Dinah M. Craik, Florence Nightingale, Frances P. Cobbe, and Lucie Duff Gordon are among the entries. Excerpts cover such topics of the age as British imperialism, the crisis of religious faith, and debates about gender. On the issue of colonial expansion, opinions range from Benjamin Disraeli's celebration of empire-building as evidence of Britain's glory to David Livingstone's promotion of commerce with Africa as a way to retard the slave trade and make it unprofitable. Views on "the woman question" extend from John Stuart Mill's defense of women's rights to Mrs. Humphry Ward's opposition to women's franchise and Sarah Ellis's support for the domestic ideal. This invaluable resource features: attention to important noncanonical writers—including a generous selection of women writers; a wide range of written forms, including periodical essays, travel accounts, letters, lectures, autobiographies, and social surveys; both chronological and thematic tables of contents—the latter encompassing subject areas such as England at home and abroad, the new sciences, religion, and the status of women; selections drawn from the original nineteenth-century editions; and annotations to each text that aid nonspecialists in understanding unfamiliar names, terms, and cultural debates.