Art Criticism Online

A History

Author: Charlotte Frost

Publisher: Gylphi Limited

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 339

View: 440

The mainstream press often celebrates the ‘tweeting’, ‘facebooking’ and ‘gramming’ of art commentary. Yet online forms of art criticism have a much longer and more varied history than we think. Far preceding the art discussions happening on the likes of Twitter and Facebook. Before art discussions took place on social media, there were networked art projects and art critical Bulletin Board Systems, email discussion lists and blogs. Art Criticism Online: A History provides the first in-depth history of art criticism following the Internet. The book considers the core stages of development and considers where critical practice is heading in the future. Charlotte Frost's Art Criticism Online provides a much needed account and indispensable survey of the ways in which Western art criticism has been profoundly affected and changed by the online environment. Building on the history of networked and participatory criticism predating the Internet, Frost traces three different phases of online art criticism unfolding in early discussion groups, on listservs, and within today's blogosphere and social media platforms. The book expertly captures nuanced transformations in art criticism's content, form and style, analyzing how approaches have shifted in response to the evolution of the art world terrain. Art Criticism Online successfully manages to provide readers with a map of the dynamic expressions of today's critical culture. --Christiane Paul, Adjunct Curator of Digital Art, Whitney Museum, Director/Chief Curator, Sheila C. Johnson Design Center, Parsons/The New School So what happened to art criticism, anyway? This lively history is a vital resource for anyone interested in this question. Drawing on a half-century of examples, the book discusses the new, experimental writing practices the internet has made possible, and its destructive effects, making a persuasive case that art criticism hasn't gone away it's just changed radically. --Michael Connor, Artistic Director, Rhizome

Supercommunity

Diabolical Togetherness Beyond Contemporary Art

Author: E-Flux

Publisher: Verso Books

ISBN:

Category: Art and society

Page: 480

View: 414

"Invited to exhibit at the 56th Venice Biennale, e-flux journal produced a single issue over a four-month span, publishing an article a day both online and on site from Venice. In essays, poems, short stories, and plays, artists and theorists trace the negative collective that is the subject of contemporary life, in which art, the internet, and globalization have shed their utopian guises but persist as naked power, in the face of apocalyptic ecological disaster and against the claims of the social commons."--Back cover.

Multidisciplinarity

Projects for Social Change in Art and Culture

Author: Luisa Santos

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 132

View: 681

In Manifesto for an Independent Revolutionary Art André Breton and Diego Rivera, under the effects of German fascism and Russian Stalinism in society, argued that art can only impact society and be revolutionary if it becomes independent of any social constructs. Almost six decades later, in the rise of what became known as "relational aesthetics", the field of multidisciplinarity is expanding and many artistic projects for social change claim to be multidisciplinarity. However, such projects show that we are still far from a broad discourse of multidisciplinarity. Multidisciplinarity takes a step towards a down-to-earth discussion of the relation between disciplinary discourses and grand narratives in three different projects, focusing mainly on its artistic, cultural and management aspects. Indeed, drawing from the eclectic construction of these three multidisciplinary projects, this volume serves to bridge the gap between the theoretical debates of disciplinary discourses and the harshness of everyday life in communities where projects for social change are being implemented. Presenting a panoptical view that places academic research side by side with daily life, Multidisciplinarity unveils the bigger picture of both projects and interdisciplinary discourses. This insightful volume will appeal to students and researchers interested in fields such as Project Management, Multidisciplinarity, Culture Studies and Organisational Studies.

Censoring Art

Silencing the Artwork

Author: Roisin Kennedy

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 208

View: 482

Art is continuously subjected to insidious forms of censorship. This may be by the Church to guard against moral degeneration, by the State to promote a specific political agenda or by the art market, to elevate one artist above another. Now, and in the last century, artwork that touches on ethnic, religious, sexual, national or institutional sensitivities is liable to be destroyed or hidden away, ignored or side-lined. Drawing from new research into historical and contemporary case-studies, Censoring Art: Silencing the Artwork provides diverse ways of understanding the purpose and mechanisms of art censorship across distinct geopolitical and cultural contexts from Iran, Japan, and Uzbekistan to Britain, Ireland, Canada, Macedonia, Soviet Russia, and Cyprus. Its contributions uncover the impact of this silent control of the production and exhibition of art and consider how censorship has affected art practice and public perceptions of artworks.

U+29DC aka Documento Continuo

Author: Enrico Boccioletti

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN:

Category: Reference

Page: 268

View: 995

U+29DC aka Documento Continuo is an artist book and a research into that contemporary zeitgeist that has been labeled "post internet." Originally conceived as a MA thesis, Documento Continuo is a textual and visual collage strongly relying on appropriation as the only possible way to draw your own path through the information overload. Written in Italian but mostly in "International Art English," it focuses on issues like awareness, creolization, the crisis of the European Union, dematerialization and materiality, globalization, performance, identity, FOMO, and how to be an artist in the age of "always on." Enrico Boccioletti (born 1984 in Pesaro, Italy) is an artist and performer based in Milan. His practice develops at the threshold between digital gauziness and physical materiality. He is interested in incompleteness and circularity, duplication, strata, waste, layering, shifts in context, forgery, faux-real.

What's Love (or Care, Intimacy, Warmth, Affection) Got to Do with It?

Author: E-Flux Journal

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Interpersonal relations

Page: 360

View: 724

It is often said that we no longer have an addressee for our political demands. But that's not true. We have each other. What we can no longer get from the state, the party, the union, the boss, we ask for from one another. And we provide. Lacan famously defined love as giving something you don't have to someone who doesn't want it. But love is more than a YouTube link or a URL. Love's joy is not to be found in fulfillment, it is to be found in recognition: even though I can never return what was taken away from you, I may be the only person alive who knows what it is. In our present times--post-human, post-reality, or maybe pre-internet, post-it, pre-collapse, pre-fabricated by algorithms--what does love have to do with it? Since 2009, need and care and desire and admiration have been cross-examined, called as witness, put on parole, and made the subject of caring inquiry by e-flux journal authors. These writings have now been collected to form this comprehensive volume. Contributors Paul Chan, Keti Chukhrov, Cluster, Antke Engel, Hu Fang, Brian Kuan Wood, Lee Mackinnon, Chus Martínez, Tavi Meraud, Fred Moten and Stefano Harney, Elizabeth A. Povinelli and Kim Turcot DiFruscia, Paul B. Preciado, Martha Rosler, Virginia Solomon, Jalal Toufic, Jan Verwoert, Slavoj Zizek Series edited by Julieta Aranda, Brian Kuan Wood, Kaye Cain-Nielsen, Stephen Squibb, Anton Vidokle

9.5 Theses on Art and Class

Author: Ben Davis

Publisher: Haymarket Books

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 224

View: 588

9.5 Theses on Art and Class seeks to show how a clear understanding of class makes sense of what is at stake in a broad number of contemporary art's most persistent debates, from definitions of political art to the troubled status of "outsider" and street art to the question of how we maintain faith in art itself. Ben Davis currently lives and works in New York City where he is Executive Editor at Artinfo.

The Lumière Galaxy

Seven Key Words for the Cinema to Come

Author: Francesco Casetti

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 304

View: 252

Francesco Casetti believes new media technologies are producing an exciting new era in cinema aesthetics. Whether we experience film in the theater, on our hand-held devices, in galleries and museums, onboard and in flight, or up in the clouds in the bits we download, cinema continues to alter our habits and excite our imaginations. Casetti travels from the remote corners of film history and theory to the most surprising sites on the internet and in our cities to prove the ongoing relevance of cinema. He does away with traditional notions of canon, repetition, apparatus, and spectatorship in favor of new keywords, including expansion, relocation, assemblage, and performance. The result is an innovative understanding of cinema's place in our lives and culture, along with a critical sea-change in the study of the art. The more the nature of cinema transforms, the more it discovers its own identity, and Casetti helps readers realize the galaxy of possibilities embedded in the medium.

from estranger to e-stranger

Author: Annie Abrahams

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 100

View: 202

This book is a compilation of the 77 posts Annie Abrahams wrote for her (e)stranger website between April and August 2014. Some of these are personal, others go back to literature, art works or are more theoretical. Abrahams plays creatively with ideas of what it means to be an (e)stranger. She researches its possibilities, beyond it's handicapping proprieties and touches upon themes as different as the use of Latin in church to questions about the relation between code and emotions. PastMono, research, collage, bricolage, assemblage. An (e)stranger is invisible, exotic, unidentifiable, rude, hybrid, blurry, deformed, subversive, incomprehensible, complex, pliable, lonely, abject, harder and more fragile at the same time ... they are more resilient, more inventive, know how to protect themselves, are good observers, look around a lot, see and ask questions about things that seem to be self-evident ...