Dvorák and His World

Author: Michael Beckerman

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 296

View: 592

Antonin Dvorák made his famous trip to the United States one hundred years ago, but despite an enormous amount of attention from scholars and critics since that time, he remains an elusive figure. Comprising both interpretive essays and a selection of fascinating documents that bear on Dvorák's career and music, this volume addresses fundamental questions about the composer while presenting an argument for a radical reappraisal. The essays, which make up the first part of the book, begin with Leon Botstein's inquiry into the reception of Dvorák's work in German-speaking Europe, in England, and in America. Commenting on the relationship between Dvorák and Brahms, David Beveridge offers the first detailed portrait of perhaps the most interesting artistic friendship of the era. Joseph Horowitz explores the context in which the "New World" Symphony was premiered a century ago, offering an absorbing account of New York musical life at that time. In discussing Dvorák as a composer of operas, Jan Smaczny provides an unexpected slant on the widely held view of him as a "nationalist" composer. Michael Beckerman further investigates this view of Dvorák by raising the question of the role nationalism played in music of the nineteenth century. The second part of this volume presents Dvorák's correspondence and reminiscences as well as unpublished reviews and criticism from the Czech press. It includes a series of documents from the composer's American years, a translation of the review of Rusalka's premiere with the photographs that accompanied the article, and Janácek's analyses of the symphonic poems. Many of these documents are published in English for the first time.

Janácek and His World

Author: Michael Beckerman

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 320

View: 170

Once thought to be a provincial composer of only passing interest to eccentrics, Leos Janácek (1854-1928) is now widely acknowledged as one of the most powerful and original creative figures of his time. Banned for all purposes from the Prague stage until the age of 62, and unable to make it even out of the provincial capital of Brno, his operas are now performed in dynamic productions throughout the globe. This volume brings together some of the world's foremost Janácek scholars to look closely at a broad range of issues surrounding his life and work. Representing the latest in Janácek scholarship, the essays are accompanied by newly translated writings by the composer himself. The collection opens with an essay by Leon Botstein who clarifies and amplifies how Max Brod contributed to Janácek 's international success by serving as "point man" between Czechs and Germans, Jews and non-Jews. John Tyrrell, the dean of Janácek scholars, distills more than thirty years of research in "How Janácek Composed Operas," while Diane Paige considers Janácek's liason with a married woman and the question of the artist's muse. Geoffrey Chew places the idea of the adulterous muse in the larger context of Czech fin de siècle decadence in his thoroughgoing consideration of Janácek's problematic opera Osud. Derek Katz examines the problems encountered by Janácek's satirically patriotic "Excursions of Mr. Broucek" in the post-World War I era of Czechoslovak nationalism, while Paul Wingfield mounts a defense of Janácek against allegations of cruelty in his wife's memoirs. In the final essay, Michael Beckerman asks how much true history can be culled from one of Janácek's business cards. The book then turns to writings by Janácek previously unpublished in English. These not only include fascinating essays on Naturalism, opera direction, and Tristan and Isolde, but four impressionistic chronicles of the "speech melodies" of daily life. They provide insight into Janácek's revolutionary method of composition, and give us the closest thing we will ever have to the "heard" record of a Czech pre-war past-or any past, for that matter.

Max Bruch in Sondershausen (1867-1870)

musikwissenschaftliches Symposium am 14./15. Juni 2001 in Sondershausen anlässlich des Ersten Max Bruch Festes

Author: Peter Larsen

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 232

View: 558

A Basic Guide to Decathlon

Author: United States Olympic Committee

Publisher: Gareth Stevens Pub

ISBN:

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 150

View: 245

Briefly traces the history of the decathlon, describes each of the ten events, and offers advice for getting started in the sport, training, and competing.

KPFA Folio

Author: KPFA (Radio station : Berkeley, Calif.)

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Radio

Page:

View: 589

The World of Music

Author: Kjell Bloch Sandved

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 1516

View: 977

Gives information on popular and classical American performers and topics.

Musica Aeterna

Program Notes for 1967-1971

Author: Josef Braunstein

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 296

View: 921

Dvorak

His Life and Music

Author: Neil Wenborn

Publisher: Naxos Audio Books

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 224

View: 139

Looks at the life and career of the Czech composer in a work accompanied by two sound discs with excerpts of his best-known works.

Free World

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: World War, 1939-1945

Page:

View: 134

MacUser

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Macintosh (Computer)

Page:

View: 703

PC World

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Electronic digital computers

Page:

View: 248