Dutch Painters of the 19th Century

Author: Marius

Publisher: Antique Collectors Club Limited

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 307

View: 790

Aandacht voor o.a. de Haagse School, de romantici, de landschapschilders en genreschilders.

Dutch Painting in the Nineteenth Century

Author: Gerarda Hermina Marius

Publisher: Theclassics.Us

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 52

View: 397

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1908 edition. Excerpt: ...Israels in the lives of the fishermen was the natural manner in which these unpolished people displayed their little joys, their sufferings, their fears, against the majestic background of the sea, the source alike of their livelihood and their affliction. A painter, he beheld in them picturesque figures in harmonious surroundings filled with atmosphere and with that incalculable light which is but seldom to be found in a solid, square interior fashioned of bricks and wood; he saw the children playing freely in the pools left behind by the retreating tide; he saw the mothers lulling their children to sleep; he saw death striking at the household; he saw the fishermen in touch with the sea. And his art is great even outside these subjects; and, without speaking of his portraits, which come so near to life, we admire the same breadth of view, the same expressiveness, the same poetry, whether he paints himself under the light of a lamp, or a harpist seated at her instrument, or a fashionable woman at her window, or a woman bathing. Even in his Sexton, that great pendant of the psychological interiors, that remarkable piece which, in its soberness, of all Israels' mighty work perhaps approaches nearest to Rembrandt and, at the same time, is allied to the greatness of our little masters: even here there is not a vestige of what we may call Tendenz. One who did not know Israels and who judged him only by his works could readily picture him as a melancholy man, burdened and bent with the suffering which he reproduces in his paintings. Nothing is farther from the truth. He sees the suffering; he penetrates into the loneliness, the poverty, the very being of forlorn humanity; he has the imagination necessary to exalt his single figures into types, ..

Dutch Painting in the Nineteenth Century - Primary Source Edition

Author: G. Hermine Marius

Publisher: Nabu Press

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 490

View: 347

This is a reproduction of a book published before 1923. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book.

The Poetry of Reality

Dutch Painters of the Nineteenth Century

Author: Maurice Boom

Publisher: W Books

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 215

View: 904

"The artistic work produced in the Netherlands a hundred years ago is characterized by enormous variety. Impressionism was still a strong influence, but young artists were exploring numerous other avenues as well. Some turned to new sources of inspiration such as Japanese art and symbolism, while others were pushing stylization to its limits. International schools were followed closely by the Dutch artists, many of whom stayed for months at a time in Paris, the South of France or London to study the new trends at close range. These developments, which roughly spanned the period 1885-1915, began with Van Gogh, and ended with Mondrian...This book explores the significance of this period of art on paper...The selection gives an excellent impression of the range of work produced on paper in the period around 1900."--back cover

Dutch Painting in the Nineteenth Century with a Photogravure and 130 Reproductions in Half-Tone

Author: G Hermine Marius

Publisher: Palala Press

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 159

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

The Poetry of Reality

Dutch Painters of the Nineteenth Century

Author: Marjan van Heteren

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Painting, Dutch

Page: 215

View: 148

Notes on Aesthetic Relationships Between 17th-century Dutch Painting and 19th-century Photography

Author: Carl Chiarenza

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Painting, Dutch

Page: 32

View: 456

"The approach of the nineteenth-century photographer and that of the seventh-century Dutch painter were similar. The nineteenth-century genre photograph was often posed in the studio, or it was a combination print ... made up of several negatives which the photographer later integrated into a single picture. The result was not documentary. Nor were most seventeenth-century Dutch paintings, which were often made up of several sketches ... incorporated into a single picture."--Leaf 23

American Painting of the Nineteenth Century

Realism, Idealism, and the American Experience

Author: Barbara Novak

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 306

In this distinguished work, which Hilton Kramer in The New York Times Book Review called "surely the best book ever written on the subject," Barbara Novak illuminates what is essentially American about American art. She highlights not only those aspects that appear indigenously in our art works, but also those features that consistently reappear over time. Novak examines the paintings of Washington Allston, Thomas Cole, Asher B. Durand, Fitz H. Lane, William Sidney Mount, Winslow Homer, Thomas Eakins, and Albert Pinkham Ryder. She draws provocative and original conclusions about the role in American art of spiritualism and mathematics, conceptualism and the object, and Transcendentalism and the fact. She analyzes not only the paintings but nineteenth-century aesthetics as well, achieving a unique synthesis of art and literature. Now available with a new preface and an updated bibliography, this lavishly illustrated volume--featuring more than one hundred black-and-white illustrations and sixteen full-color plates--remains one of the seminal works in American art history.

The Mirror of Reality

19th-Century Painting in the Netherlands

Author: Jenny Reynaerts

Publisher: Mercatorfonds

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 400

View: 663

A beautifully designed and lavishly illustrated survey of 19th-century paintings in the Netherlands This comprehensive overview is the first book in more than 60 years on the underexplored history of painting in the Netherlands in the 19th century. Jenny Reynaerts, an acclaimed specialist in 19th-century Dutch art, takes a close look at works from famous canvases by Vincent van Gogh to lesser-known works and even recently discovered paintings. Offering a synthesis of numerous focused studies from the past 50 years, Reynaerts pays special attention to the stylistic developments, the contemporary art market, and the relationships that Dutch artists at the time had with the international art world. The book boasts 500 illustrations by artists including Van Gogh, Ary Scheffer, Lawrence Alma-Tadema, Barend Cornelis Koekkoek, Jacob and Matthijs Maris, and many more. Designed by renowned Dutch designer Irma Boom, this book will serve as the authoritative text on 19th-century painting in the Netherlands.

Art of the Everyday

Dutch Painting and the Realist Novel

Author: Ruth Bernard Yeazell

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 252

View: 252

Realist novels are celebrated for their detailed attention to ordinary life. But two hundred years before the rise of literary realism, Dutch painters had already made an art of the everyday--pictures that served as a compelling model for the novelists who followed. By the mid-1800s, seventeenth-century Dutch painting figured virtually everywhere in the British and French fiction we esteem today as the vanguard of realism. Why were such writers drawn to this art of two centuries before? What does this tell us about the nature of realism? In this beautifully illustrated and elegantly written book, Ruth Yeazell explores the nineteenth century's fascination with Dutch painting, as well as its doubts about an art that had long challenged traditional values. After showing how persistent tensions between high theory and low genre shaped criticism of novels and pictures alike, Art of the Everyday turns to four major novelists--Honoré de Balzac, George Eliot, Thomas Hardy, and Marcel Proust--who strongly identified their work with Dutch painting. For all these writers, Dutch art provided a model for training themselves to look closely at the particulars of middle-class life. Yet even as nineteenth-century novelists strove to create illusions of the real by modeling their narratives on Dutch pictures, Yeazell argues, they chafed at the model. A concluding chapter on Proust explains why the nineteenth century associated such realism with the past and shows how the rediscovery of Vermeer helped resolve the longstanding conflict between humble details and the aspirations of high art.