Dublin Made Me

Author: C. S. Andrews

Publisher: Lilliput PressLtd

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 335

View: 432

These two classic memoirs beautifully chronicle C.S. Andrews' life in Dublin as a participant-and one of the founding fathers-in the formation of the State, and are as relevant to a new generation as they were when first published twenty years ago. T

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Dublin Made Me

Author: Peter Sheridan

Publisher: Penguin Group USA

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 278

View: 245

A stirring, funny memoir of life in Dublin recalls the arrival of British television in one family's home--an event that brings sex, drugs, and the Beatles into an otherwise peaceful Catholic home. Reprint.

Crime Fiction in the City

Capital Crimes

Author: Lucy Andrew

Publisher: University of Wales Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 208

View: 254

Crime Fiction in the City: Capital Crimes expands upon previous studies of the urban space and crime by reflecting on the treatment of the capital city, a repository of authority, national identity and culture, within crime fiction. This wide-ranging collection looks at capital cities across Europe, from the more traditional centres of power - Paris, Rome and London - to Europe's most northern capital, Stockholm, and also considers the newly devolved capitals, Dublin, Edinburgh and Cardiff. The texts under consideration span the nineteenth-century city mysteries to contemporary populist crime fiction. The collection opens with a reflective essay by Ian Rankin and aims to inaugurate a dialogue between Anglophone and European crime writing; to explore the marginalised works of Irish and Welsh writers alongside established European crime writers and to interrogate the relationship between fact and fiction, creativity and criticism, within the crime genre.

Irish Writing in the Twentieth Century

A Reader

Author: David Pierce

Publisher: Cork University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 1351

View: 964

Extending to over 1300 pages Irish Writing in the Twentieth Century: A Reader offers a comprehensive and pleasurable introduction to modern Irish literature in a single volume. The Reader contains over 400 pieces including letters, diaries, newspaper and journal articles, songs, poems, critical essays, literary profiles, entire plays and short stories as well as extracts from novels and other longer works. Texts which until now have been out of print or difficult to locate are made easily accessible once more."

A Nation and not a Rabble

The Irish Revolution 1913–23

Author: Diarmaid Ferriter

Publisher: Profile Books

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 920

View: 189

Packed with violence, political drama and social and cultural upheaval, the years 1913-1923 saw the emergence in Ireland of the Ulster Volunteer Force to resist Irish home rule and in response, the Irish Volunteers, who would later evolve into the IRA. World War One, the rise of Sinn Fin, intense Ulster unionism and conflict with Britain culminated in the Irish war of Independence, which ended with a compromise Treaty with Britain and then the enmities and drama of the Irish Civil War. Drawing on an abundance of newly released archival material, witness statements and testimony from the ordinary Irish people who lived and fought through extraordinary times, A Nation and not a Rabble explores these revolutions. Diarmaid Ferriter highlights the gulf between rhetoric and reality in politics and violence, the role of women, the battle for material survival, the impact of key Irish unionist and republican leaders, as well as conflicts over health, land, religion, law and order, and welfare.

Seán MacBride, A Life

From IRA Revolutionary to International Statesman

Author: Elizabeth Keane

Publisher: Gill & Macmillan Ltd

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 325

View: 393

An exceptional man, an extraordinary career – a life of Seán MacBride, Ireland’s most distinguished statesman Seán MacBride (1904–1988) was at different times the Chief of Staff of the IRA, a top criminal lawyer, leader of Clann na Poblachta, Irish Foreign Minister, UN Commissioner, and a founding member of Amnesty International. He is the only person to have won both the Nobel Peace Prize (1974) and the Lenin Peace Prize (1977). Seán MacBride, A Life, by accomplished historian Elizabeth Keane, is the first complete biography of this multifaceted, complex and internationally renowned Irish politician. From revolutionary terrorist to conservative constitutional politician to liberal elder statesman and international humanitarian, Seán MacBride uncovers the political and personal story of one of twentieth-century Ireland’s most controversial figures. Seán MacBride begins with MacBride’s birth in Paris in 1904. With icons of the nationalist movement in Ireland for parents, MacBride’s future as a politician was fated: his father John MacBride was a Boer War hero executed for his role in the Easter Rising of 1916; his mother Maud Gonne was an outspoken revolutionary and the lost love and muse of Ireland’s most famous poet W.B. Yeats. Seán MacBride then looks at MacBride’s membership of the IRA, which he joined as teenager. He fought in both the Irish War of Independence and the Irish Civil War. Seán MacBride charts his rapid rise through the ranks, looking at how he became the Director of Intelligence and later Chief of Staff of the IRA before relinquishing his position and becoming a top criminal barrister. MacBride entered Dáil Éireann for the first time in 1947 as the leader of Clann na Poblachta, and formed the first coalition government in Irish history in 1948. Appointed Minister for External Affairs (Foreign Minister), Seán MacBride considers MacBride’s tenure in office, which included overseeing the acceptance of the European Convention on Human Rights, the rejection of NATO and Ireland’s exit from the Commonwealth. His refusal to support fellow Clann na Poblachta TD Noël Browne’s Mother-and-Child Scheme in the face of the opposition of the Catholic bishops led to the collapse of the coalition. MacBride lost his seat in the 1957 election, retired officially from Irish party politics and entered the third phase of his life: international statesman and human rights activist. Seán MacBride looks at the pivotal role MacBride played in European and international politics and human rights over the course of his later years, including founding Amnesty International, opposing apartheid in South Africa and agitating against nuclear armament. Few Irish politicians have had such an impact domestically and internationally. From MacBride’s violent IRA beginnings to his later advocacy of peace in politics, Seán MacBride, A Life captures the twists and turns of a fascinating career. A figure of national and international importance, one of the most distinguished Irish people of the twentieth century, he has found a biographer of authority and assurance in Elizabeth Keane, whose survey of his life and times is astute, insightful and convincing. Praise for Elizabeth Keane: ‘A singular voice in Irish history’ The Sunday Business Post Seán MacBride, A Life: Table of Contents Preface Man of Destiny A Sort of Homecoming From Chief-of-Staff to Chief Counsel Fighting Your Battles The Harp Without the Crown Rattling the Sabre Coming out of the Cave Catholic First, Irishman Second A Statesman of International Status Never Lost His Fenian Fate Conclusion

A New History of Ireland Volume VII

Ireland, 1921-84

Author: J. R. Hill

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 1254

View: 441

A New History of Ireland is the largest scholarly project in modern Irish history. In 9 volumes, it provides a comprehensive new synthesis of modern scholarship on every aspect of Irish history and prehistory, from the earliest geological and archaeological evidence, through the Middle Ages, down to the present day. Volume VII covers a period of major significance in Ireland's history. It outlines the division of Ireland and the eventual establishment of the Irish Republic. It provides comprehensive coverage of political developments, north and south, as well as offering chapters on the economy, literature in English and Irish, the Irish language, the visual arts, emigration and immigration, and the history of women. The contributors to this volume, all specialists in their field, provide the most comprehensive treatment of these developments of any single-volume survey of twentieth-century Ireland.

The Republic

The Fight for Irish Independence, 1918-1923

Author: Charles Townshend

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 560

View: 383

A gripping narrative of the most critical years in modern Ireland's history, from Charles Townshend The protracted, terrible fight for independence pitted the Irish against the British and the Irish against other Irish. It was both a physical battle of shocking violence against a regime increasingly seen as alien and unacceptable and an intellectual battle for a new sort of country. The damage done, the betrayals and grim compromises put the new nation into a state of trauma for at least a generation, but at a nearly unacceptable cost the struggle ended: a new republic was born. Charles Townshend's Easter 1916 opened up the astonishing events around the Rising for a new generation and in The Republic he deals, with the same unflinchingly wish to get to the truth behind the legend, with the most critical years in Ireland's history. There has been a great temptation to view these years through the prisms of martyrology and good-and-evil. The picture painted by Townshend is far more nuanced and sceptical - but also never loses sight of the ordinary forms of heroism performed by Irish men and women trapped in extraordinary times. Reviews: 'Electric ... [a] magisterial and essential book' Irish Times About the author: Charles Townshend is the author of the highly praised Easter 1916:The Irish Rebellion. His other books include The British Campaigns in Ireland, 1919-21 and When God Made Hell: The British Invasion of Mesopotamia and the Making of Iraq, 1914-21.

Peter Paul Galligan

"One of the Most Dangerous Men in the Rebel Movement"

Author: Kevin Galligan

Publisher: The Liffey Press

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 221

View: 926

The stories of the leading figures of the Irish revolution - Michael Collins, Eamon de Valera, and guerrillas like Tom Barry and Ernie O’Malley - have been well told. But many other senior-ranking activists were equally committed. However, their experience remains obscure to most people. What was it like to try to launch the Easter Rising in a provincial town outside Dublin? What happened to the Volunteers imprisoned after the rising in maximum security prisons? How did counties such as Cavan and Wexford experience the revolution? This look at the life of Peter Paul Galligan throws light on these issues. Peter Paul Galligan joined the Irish Republican Brotherhood in 1910 and the Irish Volunteers in 1913. In 1916 he helped lead the Easter Rising in Enniscorthy. On the rebels’ surrender he was imprisoned in the harshest of conditions in Dartmoor prison - forbidden to speak to other prisoners and reduced at times to a diet of bread and water. Galligan’s story also shows the experience of the War of Independence on the ground in his native Cavan. Dublin Castle file refers to him as “one of the most dangerous men in the Rebel Movement.” As a member of Dáil Eireann, Galligan voted for the Treaty but also voted two days later for Eamon de Valera as President. In the ensuing Civil War, he stayed neutral but was in contact with the Anti-Treaty commanders. This is a fascinating story of a little known but significant contributor to Irish history.