The Galaxy Is Rated G

Essays on Children's Science Fiction Film and Television

Author: R.C. Neighbors

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 292

View: 166

"These essays analyze the confluences of science fiction and children's visual media, handling such cultural icons as Flash Gordon, the Jetsons and Star Wars, as well as contemporary fare like the films Wall-E, Monsters vs. Aliens and Toy Story. Collectively, the essays discover, applaud and critique the hidden messages presented on film and TV screens"--Provided by publisher.

Who’s 50

The 50 Doctor Who Stories to Watch Before You Die: An Unofficial Companion

Author: Graeme Burk

Publisher: ECW/ORIM

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 420

View: 670

“Like being thrown the keys to the TARDIS with a temporal map to visit all those not-to-be-missed adventures in time and space” (Phil Ford, Doctor Who writer). Ever since its premiere on November 23, 1963, Doctor Who has been a television phenomenon. This companion guide presents the top fifty stories from the show’s first fifty years—examining every corner of the imaginative, humorous, and sometimes scary universe that has made Doctor Who an iconic part of popular culture. This must-have reference also includes behind the scenes details, goofs, trivia, connections to Doctor Who lore, and much more.

Time, Unincorporated 3: The Doctor Who Fanzine Archives (Vol. 3: Writings on the New Series)

Author: Graeme Burk

Publisher: Mad Norwegian Press

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page:

View: 755

In Time, Unincorporated, the best essays and commentary from a range of Doctor Who fanzines are collected and made available to a wider audience. In spirit, this series picks up the torch from Virgin's License Denied collection (1997), concentrating some of the most delightful, insightful and strange writings on Who into a single source.The third and final volume of this series contains nearly 65 essays that examine the new Doctor Who up to and including the 2010 series starring Matt Smith. The essays stem from a wide array of fanzines such as Enlightenment, Tides of Time, Shockeye's Kitchen, Movement and more.As a bonus, nearly 20 of the essays were written exclusively for this volume by the likes of Doctor Who script editor Andrew Cartmel; novelists Jonathan Blum, Kate Orman, Lloyd Rose and Steve Lyons; Tammy Garrison (Torchwood Babiez); and Lynne M. Thomas (Chicks Dig Time Lords). With a foreword by new-series writer Robert Shearman (Running Through Corridors).

Highlanders' Revenge

Author: Paul Tors

Publisher: Troubador Publishing Ltd

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 416

View: 601

“It was the first week of May 1940 and Mash was part of a patrol from the Cameron Highlanders. They were a few miles in front of the Maginot Line, the impregnable defensive system the French had built along the German border, on what the French called the Line of Contact...” Highlanders’ Revenge tells the story of Mash, the nickname Highland soldiers give to an Englishman in their ranks. Scarred both from the retreat before the Blitzkrieg advance across France and from the murder of his first love, Mash has to integrate himself into a new section that is wary of the sullen and secretive ‘Mash Man’ – an outsider in their midst. Together they journey to Egypt where they encounter a way of life that tests them to their limits. Scorched by day, frozen by night and plagued by insects, they have to learn how to live and fight in the desert as they prepare for one of the greatest battles of the Second World War. They are then cast into the thick of the fighting at El Alamein and the Allies’ tumultuous battle to break through the Axis defenses... Highlanders’ Revenge combines the fast-paced action and intrigue of a military novel with the real-life exploits of the 5th Camerons, an extraordinary unit that saw action in most of the major battles in North Africa and Western Europe. As a result, the book is both a riotous story of battle and life, and also an insight into the world of this little-known, but fierce, fighting unit. It will appeal to fans of military fiction who also appreciate historical accuracy.

Doctor Who and Philosophy

Bigger on the Inside

Author: Courtland Lewis

Publisher: Open Court

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 288

View: 264

Not only is Doctor Who the longest-running science fiction TV show in history, but it has also been translated into numerous languages, broadcast around the world, and referred to as the “way of the future” by some British politicians. The Classic Doctor Who series built up a loyal American cult following, with regular conventions and other activities. The new series, relaunched in 2005, has emerged from culthood into mass awareness, with a steadily growing viewership and major sales of DVDs. The current series, featuring the Eleventh Doctor, Matt Smith, is breaking all earlier records, in both the UK and the US. Doctor Who is a continuing story about the adventures of a mysterious alien known as “the Doctor,” a traveller of both time and space whose spacecraft is the TARDIS (Time and Relative Dimensions in Space), which from the outside looks like a British police telephone box of the 1950s. The TARDIS is “bigger on the inside than on the outside”—actually the interior is immense. The Doctor looks human, but has two hearts, and a knowledge of all languages in the universe. Periodically, when the show changes the leading actor, the Doctor “regenerates.”

White People, Indians, and Highlanders

Tribal People and Colonial Encounters in Scotland and America

Author: Colin G. Calloway

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 392

View: 710

In nineteenth century paintings, the proud Indian warrior and the Scottish Highland chief appear in similar ways--colorful and wild, righteous and warlike, the last of their kind. Earlier accounts depict both as barbarians, lacking in culture and in need of civilization. By the nineteenth century, intermarriage and cultural contact between the two--described during the Seven Years' War as cousins--was such that Cree, Mohawk, Cherokee, and Salish were often spoken with Gaelic accents. In this imaginative work of imperial and tribal history, Colin Calloway examines why these two seemingly wildly disparate groups appear to have so much in common. Both Highland clans and Native American societies underwent parallel experiences on the peripheries of Britain's empire, and often encountered one another on the frontier. Indeed, Highlanders and American Indians fought, traded, and lived together. Both groups were treated as tribal peoples--remnants of a barbaric past--and eventually forced from their ancestral lands as their traditional food sources--cattle in the Highlands and bison on the Great Plains--were decimated to make way for livestock farming. In a familiar pattern, the cultures that conquered them would later romanticize the very ways of life they had destroyed. White People, Indians, and Highlanders illustrates how these groups alternately resisted and accommodated the cultural and economic assault of colonialism, before their eventual dispossession during the Highland Clearances and Indian Removals. What emerges is a finely-drawn portrait of how indigenous peoples with their own rich identities experienced cultural change, economic transformation, and demographic dislocation amidst the growing power of the British and American empires.

A Defence of the Scots Highlanders, in General

And Some Learned Characters, in Particular with a New and Satisfactory Account of the Picts, Scots, Fingal, Ossian, and His Poems : as Also of the Macs, Clans, Bodotria, and Several Other Particulars Respecting the High Antiquities of Scotland

Author: John Lanne Buchanan

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Highlands (Scotland)

Page: 286

View: 457