Divergence with Genetic Exchange

Author: Michael L. Arnold

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Evolutionary genetics

Page: 272

View: 476

The study of genetic exchange resulting from natural hybridization, horizontal gene transfer, and viral recombination has long been marked by controversy between researchers holding different conceptual frameworks. Those subscribing to a doctrine of 'species purity' have traditionally been reluctant to recognise inferences suggesting anything other than a marginal role for non-allopatric divergence leading to gene transfer between different lineages. However, an increasing number of evolutionary biologists now accept that there is a growing body of evidence indicating the existence of non-allopatric diversification across many lineages and all domains of biological diversity. Divergence with Genetic Exchange investigates the mechanisms associated with evolutionary divergence and diversification, focussing on the role played by the exchange of genes between divergent lineages, a process recently termed 'divergence-with-gene-flow'. Although the mechanisms by which such divergent forms of life exchange genomic material may differ widely, the outcomes of interest - adaptive evolution and the formation of new hybrid lineages - do not. Successive chapters cover the history of the field, detection methodologies, outcomes, implications for conservation programs, and the effects on the human lineage associated with the process of genetic transfer between divergent lineages. This research level text is suitable for senior undergraduate and graduate level students taking related courses in departments of genetics, ecology and evolution. It will also be of relevance and use to professional evolutionary biologists and systematists seeking a comprehensive and authoritative overview of this rapidly expanding field.

How and why Species Multiply

The Radiation of Darwin's Finches

Author: Peter R. Grant

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 218

View: 955

Throughout, the Grants show how the laboratory tools of developmental biology and molecular genetics can be combined with observations and experiments on birds in the field to gain deeper insights into why the world is so biologically rich and diverse."--BOOK JACKET.

Tropical Rainforests

Past, Present, and Future

Author: Eldredge Bermingham

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN:

Category: Nature

Page: 745

View: 293

Synthesizing theoretical and empirical analyses of the processes that help shape these unique ecosystems, Tropical Rainforests looks at the effects of evolutionary histories, past climate change, and ecological dynamics on the origin and maintenance of tropical rainforest communities. Featuring recent advances in paleoecology, climatology, geology, molecular systematics, biogeography, and community ecology, the volume also offers insights from those fields into how rainforests will endure the impact of anthropogenic change. With more than sixty contributors, Tropical Rainforests will be of great interest to students and professionals in tropical ecology and conservation.

The Dynamic Genome

A Darwinian Approach

Author: Antonio Fontdevila

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 212

View: 562

Provides a synthetic, readable account of some widely debated evolutionary issues in the context of our growing understanding of functional genomics.

Genetics and conservation

a reference for managing wild animal and plant populations

Author: Christine M. Schonewald-Cox

Publisher: Benjamin-Cummings Publishing Company

ISBN:

Category: Nature

Page: 722

View: 818

The Theory of Island Biogeography Revisited

Author: Jonathan B. Losos

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 496

View: 804

Robert H. MacArthur and Edward O. Wilson's The Theory of Island Biogeography, first published by Princeton in 1967, is one of the most influential books on ecology and evolution to appear in the past half century. By developing a general mathematical theory to explain a crucial ecological problem--the regulation of species diversity in island populations--the book transformed the science of biogeography and ecology as a whole. In The Theory of Island Biogeography Revisited, some of today's most prominent biologists assess the continuing impact of MacArthur and Wilson's book four decades after its publication. Following an opening chapter in which Wilson reflects on island biogeography in the 1960s, fifteen chapters evaluate and demonstrate how the field has extended and confirmed--as well as challenged and modified--MacArthur and Wilson's original ideas. Providing a broad picture of the fundamental ways in which the science of island biogeography has been shaped by MacArthur and Wilson's landmark work, The Theory of Island Biogeography Revisited also points the way toward exciting future research.