Dionysos

Author: Karl Kerényi

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 474

View: 146

No other god of the Greeks is as widely present in the monuments and nature of Greece and Italy, in the sensuous tradition of antiquity, as Dionysos. In myth and image, in visionary experience and ritual representation, the Greeks possessed a complete expression of indestructible life, the essence of Dionysos. In this work, the noted mythologist and historian of religion Carl Kerényi presents a historical account of the religion of Dionysos from its beginnings in the Minoan culture down to its transition to a cosmic and cosmopolitan religion of late antiquity under the Roman Empire. From the wealth of Greek literary, epigraphic, and monumental traditions, Kerényi constructs a picture of Dionysian worship, always underlining the constitutive element of myth. Included in this study are the secret cult scenes of the women's mysteries both within and beyond Attica, the mystic sacrificial rite at Delphi, and the great public Dionysian festivals at Athens. The way in which the Athenian people received and assimilated tragedy in its immanent connection with Dionysos is seen as the greatest miracle in all cultural history. Tragedy and New Comedy are seen as high spiritual forms of the Dionysian religion, and the Dionysian element itself is seen as a chapter in the religious history of Europe.

Dionysos

Archetypal Image of the Indestructible Life

Author: Karl Kerényi

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 474

View: 626

Prometheus

Archetypal Image of Human Existence

Author: Carl Kerényi

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 152

View: 679

Prometheus the god stole fire from heaven and bestowed it on humans. In punishment, Zeus chained him to a rock, where an eagle clawed unceasingly at his liver, until Herakles freed him. For the Greeks, the myth of Prometheus's release reflected a primordial law of existence and the fate of humankind. Carl Kerényi examines the story of Prometheus and the very process of mythmaking as a reflection of the archetypal function and seeks to discover how this primitive tale was invested with a universal fatality, first in the Greek imagination, and then in the Western tradition of Romantic poetry. Kerényi traces the evolving myth from Hesiod and Aeschylus, and in its epic treatment by Goethe and Shelley; he moves on to consider the myth from the perspective of Jungian psychology, as the archetype of human daring signifying the transformation of suffering into the mystery of the sacrifice.

Dionysos

origines et résurgences

Author: Ilana Zinguer

Publisher: Vrin

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 198

View: 155

Dionysos figure emblematique peut etre considere comme typique, archetypique, d'un esprit du temps. Un retour significatif de cette figure mythique est opere dans les interpretations psycho-culturelles de la civilisation depuis le milieu du XXe siecle. Figure ambivalente, il oscille entre un pole mystique et un pole millenariste. Une question majeure est alors posee a travers ces approches antinomiques: l'imaginaire mythique de l'ivresse et de la depossession de soi est-il de la Cite ou n'est-il celebre que dans les montagnes? A partir des traces archeologiques, esthetiques et culturelles, sont reperes les nombreux facteurs essentiels qui font du dionysme une des particularites constantes depuis l'Antiquite jusqu'a la Post-Modernite. Cet ouvrage presente les etudes qui constituent les approches multiples de l'origine et de la resurgence de Dionysos dans les fouilles archeologiques des societes antiques, dans les textes talmudiques, dans les renaissances complexes humanistes.

Archetypal Images in Greek Religion

5. Zeus and Hera: Archetypal Image of Father, Husband, and Wife

Author: Carl Kerényi

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 232

View: 372

What did Zeus mean to the Greeks? And who was Hera, united with Zeus historically and archetypally as if they were a human pair? C. Kerenyi fills a gap in our knowledge of the religious history of Europe by responding to these questions. Examining the word Zeus and its Greek synonyms theos and daimon, the author traces the origins of Greek religion in the Minoan-Mycenacan civilization. He shows how Homer's view of the gods decisively shaped the literary and artistic tradition of Greek divine mythology. The emergence of the Olympian family is seen as the expression of a humane Zeus cult determined by the father image but formed within the domain of Hera. Originally published in 1976. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

Backgrounds of Early Christianity

Author: Everett Ferguson

Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 648

View: 855

New to this expanded & updated edition are revisions of Ferguson's original material, updated bibliographies, & a fresh dicussion of first century social life, the Dead Sea Scrolls & much else.

Venice Incognito

Masks in the Serene Republic

Author: James H. Johnson

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 317

View: 772

"Fascinating and richly developed. Venice Incognito is a contribution both to urban studies and to the carnivalesque."—Natalie Zemon Davis, University of Toronto “Venice Incognito is a brilliant reassessment of Venetian carnival and the peculiar phenomenon of masking in early modern Venice. Johnson's wide-ranging, insightful, and imaginative scholarship is matched by his fluid and accessible writing style. This book is that all-too-rare commodity: a scholarly page-turner.” —Patricia Fortini Brown, author of Private Lives in Renaissance Venice “This is a beautiful book about a strange subject: the custom among Venetian aristocrats of wearing masks in public. One of the most original works in early modern scholarship I have read in a long time, Venice Incognito will have a permanent place on most early modern historians’ shelves and will be essential reading for performance studies and theater history.” —Edward Muir, author of The Culture Wars of the Late Renaissance “In this fascinating book, the author cleverly balances the traditional concept of masking as an anti-authoritarian culture of dissembling with the idea of the 'honest mask,' which defends rank and the established order, and produces an excellent, nuanced, and well-written account of the carnivalesque in eighteenth-century Venice.” —Aileen Ribeiro, author of Dress in Eighteenth-Century Europe “In this intriguing and thoroughly researched book, James Johnson takes the reader through the crowded calli, campi, and canals of Venice in search of the varied meanings of the mask in the history and culture of that city on the water. From masking’s first recorded appearance in the thirteenth century to its ubiquity in the carnival decline of eighteenth-century Venice, from the dissimulations of Giacomo Casanova to Arlecchino and the commedia dell’arte stage, from the social anonymity of the gambling halls to the socially charged debate over Goldoni’s radical unmasking of the actor, Venice Incognito traces the shifting functions of the mask and its implications. Just as importantly, the book challenges much conventional wisdom about masking and carnival itself.” —David Rosand, author of Painting in Sixteenth-Century Venice

Jefferson's Demons

Portrait of a Restless Mind

Author: Michael Knox Beran

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 288

View: 822

"I have often wondered for what good end the sensations of Grief could be intended." -- Thomas Jefferson Thomas Jefferson suffered during his life from periodic bouts of dejection and despair, shadowed intervals during which he was full of "gloomy forebodings" about what lay ahead. Not long before he composed the Declaration of Independence, the young Jefferson lay for six weeks in idleness and ill health at Monticello, paralyzed by a mysterious "malady." Similar lapses were to recur during anxious periods in his life, often accompanied by violent headaches. In Jefferson's Demons, Michael Knox Beran illuminates an optimistic man's darker side -- Jefferson as we have rarely seen him before. The worst of these moments came after his wife died in 1782. But two years later, after being dispatched to Europe, Jefferson recovered nerve and spirit in the salons of Paris, where he fell in love with a beautiful young artist, Maria Cosway. When their affair ended, Jefferson's health again broke down. He set out for the palms and temples of southern Europe, and though he did not know where the therapeutic journey would take him or where it would end, his encounter with the old civilizations of the Mediterranean was transformative. The Greeks and Romans taught him that a man could make productive use of his demons. Jefferson's immersion in the mystic truths of the Old World gave him insights into mysteries of life and art that Enlightenment philosophy had failed to supply. Beran skillfully shows how Jefferson drew on the esoteric lore he encountered to transform anxiety into action. On his return to America, Jefferson entered the most productive period of his life: He created a new political party, was elected president, and doubled the size of the country. His private labors were no less momentous...among them, the artistry of Monticello and the University of Virginia. Jefferson's Demons is an elegantly composed account of the strangeness and originality of one Founder's genius. Michael Knox Beran uncovers the maps Jefferson used to find his way out of dejection and to forge a new democratic culture for America. Here is a Jefferson who, with all his failings, remains one of his country's greatest teachers and prophets.

The Uses of Greek Mythology

Author: Ken Dowden

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 216

View: 550

In an innovative sequence of topics, Ken Dowden explores the uses Greeks made of myth and the uses to which we can put myth in recovering the richness of their culture. Most aspects of Greek life and history - including war, religion and sexuality - which are discernable through myth, as well as most modern approaches, are given a context in a book which is designed to be useful, accessible and stimulating.

Sociology, Religion and Grace

Author: Arpad Szakolczai

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 320

View: 513

Grace is a central concept of theology, while the term also has a wide range of meanings in many fields. For the first time in book format, the sociology of grace (or enchantment) is comprehensively explained in detail, with fascinating results. The author’s writings on this topic take the reader on an intriguing journey which traverses subjects ranging from theology, through the history of art, archaeology and mythology to anthropology. As such, this volume will interest academics across a wide range of disciplines apart from sociology.