Daughter of Sparta

Author: Claire Andrews

Publisher: Jimmy Patterson

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 400

View: 183

A James Patterson Presents Novel Sparta forged her into a deadly weapon. Now the Gods need her to save the world! Seventeen-year-old Daphne has spent her entire life honing her body and mind into that of a warrior, hoping to be accepted by the unyielding people of ancient Sparta. But an unexpected encounter with the goddess Artemis---who holds Daphne's brother's fate in her hands---upends the life she's worked so hard to build. Nine mysterious items have been stolen from Mount Olympus and if Daphne cannot find them, the gods' waning powers will fade away, the mortal world will descend into chaos, and her brother's life will be forfeit. Guided by Artemis's twin-the handsome and entirely-too-self-assured god Apollo-Daphne's journey will take her from the labyrinth of the Minotaur to the riddle-spinning Sphinx of Thebes, team her up with mythological legends such as Theseus and Hippolyta of the Amazons, and pit her against the gods themselves. A reinterpretation of the classic Greek myth of Daphne and Apollo, DAUGHTER OF SPARTA by debut author Claire Andrews turns the traditionally male-dominated mythology we know into a heart-pounding and empowering female-led adventure.

Daughters of Sparta

Author: Claire Heywood

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 384

View: 418

For millennia, men have told the legend of the woman whose face launched a thousand ships--but now it's time to hear her side of the story. Daughters of Sparta is a tale of secrets, love, and tragedy from the women behind mythology's most devastating war, the infamous Helen and her sister Klytemnestra. As princesses of Sparta, Helen and Klytemnestra have known nothing but luxury and plenty. With their high birth and unrivaled beauty, they are the envy of all of Greece. But such privilege comes at a cost. While still only girls, the sisters are separated and married to foreign kings of their father's choosing--the powerful Agamemnon, and his brother Menelaos. Yet even as Queens, each is only expected to do two things: birth an heir and embody the meek, demure nature that is expected of women. But when the weight of their husbands' neglect, cruelty, and ambition becomes too heavy to bear, Helen and Klytemnestra must push against the constraints of their society to carve new lives for themselves, and in doing so, make waves that will ripple throughout the next three thousand years. Daughters of Sparta is a vivid and illuminating reimagining of the Siege of Troy, told through the perspectives of two women whose voices have been ignored for far too long.

Daughters of Sparta

A tale of secrets, betrayal and revenge from mythology's most vilified women

Author: Claire Heywood

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 352

View: 994

Two sisters parted. Two women blamed. Two stories reclaimed. 'Required reading for fans of Circe . . . a remarkable, thrilling debut' - Fiona Davis, New York Times bestselling author of The Lions of Fifth Avenue For millennia, two women have been blamed for the fall of a mighty civilisation - but now it's time to hear their side of the story . . . As princesses of Sparta, Helen and Klytemnestra have known nothing but luxury and plenty. With their high birth and unrivalled beauty, they are the envy of all of Greece. Such privilege comes at a high price, though, and their destinies are not theirs to command. While still only girls they are separated and married off to legendary foreign kings Agamemnon and Menelaos, never to meet again. Their duty is now to give birth to the heirs society demands and be the meek, submissive queens their men expect. But when the weight of their husbands' neglect, cruelty and ambition becomes too heavy to bear, they must push against the constraints of their sex to carve new lives for themselves - and in doing so make waves that will ripple throughout the next three thousand years. Perfect for readers of Circe and Ariadne, Daughters of Sparta is a vivid and illuminating retelling of the Siege of Troy that tells the story of mythology's most vilified women from their own mouths at long last. Helen of Troy and her sister Klytemnestra are reimagined in this gorgeous retelling of the classic Greek myth - not as women defined by their husbands and lovers but as battle-weary survivors of a patriarchal society who take control of their own destiny. Absolutely riveting!' - Alka Joshi, New York Times bestselling author of The Henna Artist

Daughter of Sparta

Author: Claire Andrews

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN:

Category: Young Adult Fiction

Page: 400

View: 570

In this thrilling reimagining of ancient Greek mythology, a headstrong girl does whatever it takes to rise up and become the most powerful fighter her people have ever seen. Seventeen-year-old Daphne has spent her entire life honing her body and mind into that of a warrior, hoping to be accepted by the unyielding people of ancient Sparta. But an unexpected encounter with the goddess Artemis—who holds Daphne's brother's fate in her hands—upends the life she's worked so hard to build. Nine mysterious items have been stolen from Mount Olympus and if Daphne cannot find them, the gods' waning powers will fade away, the mortal world will descend into chaos, and her brother's life will be forfeit. Guided by Artemis's twin—the handsome and entirely-too-self-assured god Apollo—Daphne's journey will take her from the labyrinth of the Minotaur to the riddle-spinning Sphinx of Thebes, team her up with mythological legends such as Theseus and Hippolyta of the Amazons, and pit her against the gods themselves. A reinterpretation of the classic Greek myth of Daphne and Apollo, Daughter of Sparta by debut author Claire Andrews turns the traditionally male-dominated mythology we know into a heart-pounding and empowering female-led adventure.

The Pope's Daughter

A Novel of Lucrezia Borgia

Author: Dario Fo

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 241

View: 761

Lucrezia Borgia is one of the most vilified women in modern history. The daughter of a notorious pope, she was twice betrothed before the age of eleven and thrice married—one husband was forced to declare himself impotent and thereby unfit and another was murdered by Lucrezia’s own brother, Cesar Borgia. She is cast in the role of murderess, temptress, incestuous lover, loose woman, femme fatale par excellence. But there are two sides to every story. Lucrezia Borgia is the only woman in history to have serve as the head of the Catholic Church. She successfully administered several of Renaissance Italy’s most thriving cities, founded one of the world’s first credit unions, and was a generous patron of the arts. She was mother to a prince and to a cardinal. She was a devoted wife to the Prince of Ferrara, and the lover of the poet Pietro Bembo. She was a child of the renaissance and, in many ways, the world’s first modern woman. In this richly imagined novel, Nobel laureate Dario Fo reveals Lucrezia’s humanity, her passion for life, her compassion for others, and her skill at navigating around her family’s evildoings. The Borgias are unrivalled for the range and magnitude of their political machinations and opportunism. Fo’s brilliance rests in his rendering their story as a shocking mirror image of the uses and abuses of power in our own time. Lucrezia herself becomes a model for how to survive and rise above those abuses. Part Wolf Hall, part House of Cards, The Pope's Daugther will appeal to readers of historical fiction and of contemporary fiction alike and will delight anyone fascinated by Renaissance Italy.

A Daughter of To-day

A Novel

Author: Sara Jeannette Duncan

Publisher: Toronto News

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 392

View: 748

Captive Bride 2

Daughter of Sparta

Author: Andromeda

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 196

View: 706

And was Philomena beautiful... She was 18 now, of prime marriageable age and the thought of having her in his bed made his loins quiver. He would be lying if he said he didn't desire her. She was tall, athletically built but not as muscled as her mother as Philomena preferred running and archery over swords. He would be lying if he said he didn't dream of her. The last dream he had was of her laying naked under a thin sheet of fabric, the roundness of her breasts showing, her long black hair fanned out on the pillowed. She'd call to him, yet when he would reach her she'd disappear and he would wake up; feeling sexually frustrated and needing a release. It was then that he'd call a servant girl but he would imagine her to be Philomena. This was quickly becoming an obsession, a slightly unhealthy obsession but Dorian didn't care. Philomena was the prize any man would want, and he was going to make sure that she would be his. He didn't care what he had to do.

Spartan Slave, Spartan Queen

A Tale of Four Women in Sparta

Author: Helena P. Schrader

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 320

View: 135

In ancient Sparta during the Second Messenian War, two women, one beautiful and one ugly, are captured and enslaved in the same raid. This is the story of how each responds to their new situation and the women they meet in Sparta. Niobe's beauty is so great that it captures the attention of the Messenian leader, Aristomenes. He makes her a cherished concubine-until the Spartan "Scourge of Messenia," Agesandros, captures Aristomenes' palace. Niobe suddenly finds herself a slave, and the spoils of the Spartan prince Anaxilas. Unlike the beautiful and coveted Niobe, Mika is so disfigured by warts that her own uncles sold her into slavery. She becomes the spoils not of a prince but of Agesandros' squire, Leon, a slave himself. He sends her back to serve his master's wife, Alethea, in Sparta. While Niobe provokes the hostility of the Spartan Queen; Mika encounters the kindness of Alethea, and her beautiful but spirited daughter, Kassia. Soon Anaxilas turns his affections from Niobe to Kassia, while Mika falls hopelessly in love with Leon, and Leon covets only the affection of Niobe. This book picks up where Are They Singing in Sparta? left off, and although the novel revolves around unrequited love on all sides, it is really a reflection on what beauty is and how it affects human interactions-with a surprise ending.

Homer and Early Greek Epic

Collected Essays

Author: Margalit Finkelberg

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 418

View: 308

This collection includes thirty scholarly essays on Homer and Greek epic poetry published by Margalit Finkelberg over the past three decades. The topics discussed reflect the author’s research interests and represent the main directions of her contribution to Homeric studies: Homer's language and diction, archaic Greek epic tradition, Homer's world and values, transmission and reception of the Homeric poems. The book gives special emphasis to some of the central issues in contemporary Homeric scholarship, such as oral-formulaic theory and the role of the individual poet; Neoanalysis and the character of the relationship between Homer and the tradition about the Trojan War; the multi-layered texture of the Homeric poems; the Homeric Question; the canonic status of the Iliad and the Odyssey in antiquity and modernity. All the articles are revised and updated. The book addresses both scholars and advanced students of Classics, as well as non-specialists interested in the Homeric poems and their journey through centuries.

Leonidas of Sparta

A Peerless Peer

Author: Helena P. Schrader

Publisher: Wheatmark, Inc.

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 540

View: 191

Sparta at the start of the fifth century BC is in crisis. The Argives are attacking Sparta's vulnerable island of Kythera, but King Cleomenes is more interested in meddling in Athenian affairs. His co-monarch, King Demaratus, opposes Cleomenes' ambitions, and soon the kings are at each other's throats. Exploiting this internal conflict, Corinth launches a challenge to Spartan control of the Peloponnesian League, while across the Aegean Sea, the Greek cities of Ionia are in rebellion against Persia -- and pleading for Spartan aid. King Cleomenes' youngest half-brother Leonidas has only just attained citizenship. He has no reason to expect that this revolt will shape his destiny. At twenty-one, Leonidas is just an ordinary ranker in the Spartan army, less interested in high politics than putting his private life in order. He needs to find reliable tenants to restore his ruined estate, and, most important, to find the right woman to be his bride. Meanwhile, his niece Gorgo is growing up. Not particularly pretty, she is, nevertheless, precocious and courageous -- qualities that get her into trouble more than once. This is the story of both Leonidas and Gorgo in the years before Leonidas becomes king of Sparta and before the first Persian invasion of Greece sets Leonidas on the road to Thermopylae. This is the second book in a trilogy of biographical novels about Leonidas and Gorgo. The first book, A Boy of the Agoge, described Leonidas's childhood in Sparta's infamous public school. This second book focuses on his years as an ordinary citizen, and the third will describe his reign and death.

Aristomenes of Messene

Legends of Sparta's Nemesis

Author: Daniel Ogden

Publisher: ISD LLC

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 243

View: 428

With Aristomenes of Messene, Daniel Ogden identifies yet another fertile and undervalued topic in Ancient History. He has previously studied illegitimacy in the ancient Greek world (Greek Bastardy, OUP, 1996), Greek ideas about the relationship between deformity and power (Crooked Kings of Ancient Greece, Duckworth, 1997), the nature and causes of dynastic murder in the Hellenistic world (Polygamy, Prostitutes and Death, Classical Press of Wales, 1999) and the techniques of calling up the dead in the ancient world (Greek and Roman Necromancy, Princeton UP, 2001). Among his other books is a volume edited for the Classical Press of Wales, The Hellenistic World: New perspectives (2002).The legends of Aristomenes, hero of the Messenian resistance to Sparta, were designed to excite, gratify and amuse. Yet they remain almost unknown even to specialist ancient historians. This book, the first monograph to be devoted to Aristomenes, redirects attention to his adventures, which at times resemble those of King Arthur, Robin Hood and even Sinbad the Sailor. The book goes beyond the question of the historicity of Aristomenes, and examines the meaning and symbolism of the stories in their own right. The study will be welcomed by those with an interest in the history of Sparta, in Pausanias (our principal source for the tales), and in Greek traditional narrative. Famously, Sparta tried to suppress the identity and self-confidence of its Messenian helots. Yet here are stories which give access to the imagination of this long-muted but ultimately liberated people..

A Song for Sparta

Author: Helena P. Schrader

Publisher: Wheatmark, Inc.

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 526

View: 484

A lame schoolmaster, an ambitious officer, and a grieving widow find their fates interwoven as the Messenian revolt threatens to destroy Sparta. Based on an incident recorded in Herodotus, A Song for Sparta tells the remarkable story of Sparta’s struggle with Messenia in the seventh century BC through the eyes of three different narrators. The Messenian Wars were the transformative event that shaped Spartan society for the next four hundred years. Helena P. Schrader earned a PhD in History from Hamburg University before becoming a US diplomat serving in Africa and Europe. She has published more than twenty works of history and historical fiction and is the winner of multiple literary awards. Her biography of Leonidas of Sparta will be released in Athens in Greek for the 2,500th anniversary of the Battle of Thermopylae.

Mothers of Sparta

A Memoir in Pieces

Author: Dawn Davies

Publisher: Flatiron Books

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 272

View: 382

“Davies' collection of essays soars.... It's a memoir that locates the profound within the ordinary.” —Entertainment Weekly If you’re looking for a typical parenting book, this is not it. This is not a treatise on how to be a mother. This is a book about a young girl who moves to a new town every couple of years; a misfit teenager who finds solace in a local music scene; an adrift twenty-something who drops out of college to pursue her dream of making cheesecake on a stick a successful business franchise (ah, the ideals of youth). Alone in a new city, she summons her inner strength as she holds the hand of a dying stranger. Davies is a woman who finds humor in difficult pregnancies and post-partum depression (after reading “Pie” you might never eat Thanksgiving dessert the same way). She is a divorcee who unexpectedly finds second love. She is a happily married suburban wife who nevertheless makes a mental list of all the men she would have slept with. And she is a parent who finds herself tested in ways she could never imagine. In stories that cut to the quick, Davies explores passion, loss, illness, pain, and joy, told from her singular, gimlet-eyed, hilarious perspective. Mothers of Sparta is not a blow-by-blow of Davies’ life but rather an examination of the exquisite and often painful moments of a life, the moments we look back on and say, That one, that one mattered. Straddling the fence between humor and, well...not humor, Davies has written a book about what it’s like to try to carve a place for oneself in the world, no matter how unyielding the rock can be.