Darwinian Fairytales

Selfish Genes, Errors of Heredity and Other Fables of Evolution

Author: David Stove

Publisher: Encounter Books

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 345

View: 164

Whatever your opinion of ‘Intelligent Design,’ you’ll find Stove’s criticism of what he calls ‘Darwinism’ difficult to stop reading. Stove’s blistering attack on Richard Dawkins’ ‘selfish genes’ and ‘memes’ is unparalleled and unrelenting. A discussion of spiders who mimic bird droppings is alone worth the price of the book. Darwinian Fairytales should be read and pondered by anyone interested in sociobiology, the origin of altruism, and the awesome process of evolution. --Martin Gardner, author of Did Adam and Eve Have Navels?: Debunking Pseudoscience

Instilling Ethics

Author: Norma Thompson

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 239

View: 408

Instilling Ethics casts a fresh light on both the historical sources and the contemporary issues of a major preoccupation of our time: ethics. Norma Thompson has compiled essays from prominent scholars in a wide-range of disciplines to address the problems, pretensions, and positive potentialities of ethical practices today. Instilling Ethics offers a new way of connecting today's ethics to the great ethical sources of the past—classical, medieval, and early modern—and presents a wise and witty critique of the current practice of 'professional ethics.'

Against the Idols of the Age

Author: David C. Stove

Publisher: Transaction Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 347

View: 786

"Stove was undoubtedly the most stylish and witty writer of all philosphers of the last one hundred years, if not of all time. When it comes to attacking the absurdities of twentieth century intellectual movements no one else came close, and certainly no one else was as funny. The greatest iconoclast of the twentieth century, we can now see in retrospect, was not any of the European avant-garde, most of whom in fact, epitomized the spirit of the century perfectly, but this no nonsense Australian. His greatest contributions were in the philosophy of science, in particular in his defense of inductive reasoning, and in his attack on the sort of irrationalism manifested by his four horsemen, Popper, Kuhn, Lalatos, and Feyerabend."--The Review of Metaphysics "A self-proclaimed neo-positivist-and a brilliant, truculent, cantankerous essayist-Stove attacks everything from contemporary philosophy of science and evolutionary theory to religious belief and intellectual equality of women."-The Weekly Standard "What separates Stove fromyour average angry-eyed reactionaryis the startling brilliant way that he argues, combiningplain horse sense with the most nimble and skillful philosophical reasoning this side of Hume, along with a breathtaking wit." -Partisan Review "An early, fearless, sometimes reckless combatant in the science and culture warsStove fought wittily and two-fistedly on the side of empirical realism."-Choice Little known outside his native Australia, David Stove was one of the most illuminating and brilliant philosophical essayists of the postwar era. A fearless attacker of intellectual and cultural orthodoxies, Stove left powerful critiques of scientific irrationalism, Darwinian theories of human behavior, and philosophical idealism. Stove's writing is both rigorous and immensely readable. It is, in the words of Roger Kimball, "an invigorating blend of analytic lucidity, mordant humor, and an amount of common sense too great to be called 'common.'" Whether the subject is race, feminism, the Enlightenment, or the demand for "non-coercive philosophy," Stove is on the mark with a battery of impressive arguments expressed in sharp, uncompromising prose. Against the Idols of the Age concludes with a generous sampling of his blistering attacks on Darwinism. David Stove (1927-1994) taught philosophy at the University of New South Wales and, until his retirement in 1988, at the University of Sydney. He was the author of numerous essays, articles, and several books including Anything Goes: Origins of the Cult of Scientific Irrationalism, The Plato Cult and Other Intellectual Follies, and two posthumously published volumes, Darwinian Fairytales and Cricket versus Republicanism. Roger Kimball is managing editor of the New Criterion and an art critic for the London Spectator. He is author of Tenured Radicals (newly revised and expanded) The Long March: How the Cultural Revolution of the 1960s Changed America, and, most recently, Experiments Against Reality: The Fate of Culture in the Postmodern Age.

Is the Bible Divinely Inspired (Special Edition)

Author: Richie Cooley

Publisher: Richie Cooley

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 196

View: 968

This book seeks to prove the Bible through science, studies on Messianic prophecies, and by examining divine patterns in the Word and in nature. It has been newly revised in 2019.

The Dome of Eden

A New Solution to the Problem of Creation and Evolution

Author: Stephen H. Webb

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 374

View: 309

What would biology look like if it took the problem of natural evil seriously? This book argues that biological descriptions of evolution are inherently moral, just as the biblical story of creation has biological implications. A complete account of evolution will therefore require theological input. The Dome of Eden does not try to harmonize evolution and creation. Harmonizers typically begin with Darwinism and then try to add just enough religion to make evolution more palatable, or they begin with Genesis and pry open the creation account just wide enough to let in a little bit of evolution. By contrast, Stephen Webb provides a theory of how evolution and theology fit together, and he argues that this kind of theory is required by the internal demands of both theology and biology. The Dome of Eden also develops a theological account of evolution that is distinct from the intelligent design movement. Webb shows how intelligent design properly discerns the inescapable dimension of purpose in nature but, like Darwinism itself, fails to make sense of the problem of natural evil. Finally, this book draws on the work of Karl Barth to advance a new reading of the Genesis narrative and the theology of Duns Scotus to provide the necessary metaphysical foundation for evolutionary thought.

Anything Goes

Origins of the Cult of Scientific Irrationalism

Author: David Charles Stove

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Irrationalism (Philosophy)

Page: 218

View: 332

Critique of the linguistic devices which are used to support scientific irrationalism as propounded by Popper, Lakatos, Kuhn and Feyeraband. Topics discussed include philosophy and the English language, sabotaging logical expression and locating the key premise of irrationalism. Includes references, a bibliography and an index. The author's other publications include 'Darwinian Fairytales'.

Scientific Irrationalism

Origins of a Postmodern Cult

Author: David C. Stove

Publisher: Transaction Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 218

View: 219

Little known outside his native Australia, David Stove was one of the most illuminating and brilliant philosophical essayists of his era. A fearless attacker of intellectual and cultural orthodoxies, Stove left powerful critiques of scientific irrationalism, Darwinian theories of human behavior, and philosophical idealism. Since its inception in the 1940s, the field of science studies, originally intended to bridge the gap between science and the humanities, has been the center of controversy and debate. The most notable figures in this debate are Thomas Kuhn and Karl Popper. In Scientific Irrationalism, now available in paperback, David Stove demonstrates how extravagant has been the verbiage wasted on this issue and how irrational the combatants have been. He shows that Kuhn and Popper share considerable common ground. Stove argues that the problems all reside in the reasoning of the critics. He identifies the logical mistakes and conceptual allusions made by Kuhn and Popper and their supporters, as well as their collective dependency on a single argument made by the philosopher of the Scottish Enlightenment, David Hume. He then demonstrates how little potency that argument actually has for the claims of science. In his foreword, Keith Windschuttle explains the debate surrounding the field of science studies and explores David Stove's contribution as well as his lack of recognition. In an afterword, James Franklin discusses reactions to Stove's work. David Stove (1927-1994) taught philosophy at the University of New South Wales and, University of Sydney. His books include Against the Idols of the Age, The Plato Cult and Other Intellectual Follies, and two posthumously published volumes, Darwinian Fairytales, and Cricket versus Republicanism. Keith Windschuttle is an Australian writer, historian, and publisher. James Franklin is an associate professor in the School of Mathematics and Statistics at the University of New South Wales, and Stove's literary executor.

Evolution and Other Fairy Tales

Author: Larry Azar

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 636

View: 824

A year after Dr. Phil Gold leaves Chicago to become Chief of Cardiac Surgery at Southern Ohio University Hospital his world begins to fall apart. Patients are mysteriously dying, and the hospital administration and his own colleagues blame him for the disastrous consequences. As his long-distance marriage to Elizabeth, a healthcare lawyer who remained in Chicago, unravels, a beautiful cardiologist weaves a web of intrigue, diverting Phil from his quest for solutions to his personal and professional dilemmas. Phil must stop the carnage and enlists the aid of his talented but cocky African-American Chief Resident, Charles Campbell. But his search for the cause of the rash of devastating operative deaths results in threats and violence instead of answers. Patients have become pawns in an insidious scheme to maximize profits. And the schemers will go to any length to assure the success of their plans. At the risk of infuriating HMOs, hospital administrators and even his own colleagues, Dr. Myerowitz has written a fictional account, combining real changes occurring in healthcare with what might happen if medicine continues to evolve into a business. Fact or fiction? Can you tell the difference?