Dark Shadows Falling

Author: Joe Simpson

Publisher: The Mountaineers Books

ISBN:

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 208

View: 399

The author offers a personal interpretation of the values of mountaineering by describing his own climbing experiences and relating them to the Mt. Everest deaths of May 1996

The Practical Zone System

For Film and Digital Photography

Author: Chris Johnson

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN:

Category: Photography

Page: 284

View: 413

The Practical Zone System: for Film and Digital Photography 4th edition is an updated version of what has become the classic book on the technique developed by Ansel Adams in the 1940's. The zone system was designed to provide photographers with a precise and intuitive way to control the dynamic range of their negatives to produce printable results regardless of the contrast of the subjects they are shooting. What Chris Johnson has done in this new edition is completely update his approach to teaching the zone system with new film/developer testing data and new illustrations and examples. Most importantly, he has added an extensive new chapter that provides a detailed explanation for how the zone system's conceptual approach and terminology can help digital photographers achieve the highest possible quality from digital image processes. The emphasis is on subjects that include: optimizing digital camera exposure, color management and a fine printing workflow. Other important updates include: * Workflow for fine digital printing * Contemporary images * Updated film/developer test data * New film/developer tests * Updated Appendixes

Unjustifiable Risk?

The Story of British Climbing

Author: Simon Thompson

Publisher: Cicerone Press Limited

ISBN:

Category: Travel

Page: 400

View: 973

To the impartial observer Britain does not appear to have any mountains. Yet the British invented the sport of mountain climbing and for two periods in history British climbers led the world in the pursuit of this beautiful and dangerous obsession. Unjustifiable Risk is the story of the social, economic and cultural conditions that gave rise to the sport, and the achievements and motives of the scientists and poets, parsons and anarchists, villains and judges, ascetics and drunks that have shaped its development over the past two hundred years. The history of climbing inevitably reflects the wider changes that have occurred in British society, including class, gender, nationalism and war, but the sport has also contributed to changing social attitudes to nature and beauty, heroism and death. Over the years, increasing wealth, leisure and mobility have gradually transformed climbing from an activity undertaken by an eccentric and privileged minority into a sub-division of the leisure and tourist industry, while competition, improved technology and information, and increasing specialisation have helped to create climbs of unimaginable difficulty at the leading edge of the sport. But while much has changed, even more has remained the same. Today's climbers would be instantly recognisable to their Victorian predecessors, with their desire to escape from the crowded complexity of urban society and willingness to take "unjustifiable" risk in pursuit of beauty, adventure and self-fulfilment. Unjustifiable Risk was shortlisted for the Boardman Tasker prize in 2011.

After the Snow

Author: S. D. Crockett

Publisher: Feiwel & Friends

ISBN:

Category: Young Adult Fiction

Page: 304

View: 987

The oceans stopped working before Willo was born, so the world of ice and snow is all he's ever known. He lives with his family deep in the wilderness, far from the government's controlling grasp. Willo's survival skills are put to the test when he arrives home one day to find his family gone. It could be the government; it could be scavengers--all Willo knows is he has to find refuge and his family. It is a journey that will take him into the city he's always avoided, with a girl who needs his help more than he knows. S.D. Crockett on narrative voice and an especially cold winter: What was your inspiration for After the Snow? Well, apart from the unbelievably cold winter during which I was writing—in an unheated house, chopping logs and digging my car out of the snow; I think much of the inspiration for the settings in After the Snow came from my various travels. In my twenties I worked as a timber buyer in the Caucasus Mountains of southern Russia, and that work led to travels in Eastern Europe and Armenia. As soon as I step off the plane in those places it smells like home. It may sound strange to say, when After the Snow is set in Wales, but really the practical dilemmas in the book come directly from places I've been, people I've lived with, and the hardships I've seen endured with grace and capability. I was in Russia not long after the Soviet Union collapsed and I've seen society in freefall. Without realizing it at the time I think those experiences led me to dive into After the Snow with real passion. What would western civilization look like with a few tumbles under its belt? What would happen if the things we took for granted disappeared? I wanted to write a gripping story about that scenario, but hardly felt that I was straying into fantasy in the detail. What do you want readers to most remember about After the Snow? We all have the capacity to survive, but in what manner? What do we turn to in those times of trouble? Those are the questions I would like people to contemplate after reading After the Snow. How did Willo's unique voice come to you? Willo's voice appeared in those crucial first few paragraphs. After that it just grew along with his world and the terrible situations that arise. I think his voice is in all of us. We don't understand, we try to make good—maybe we find ourselves. How did you stay warm while writing this novel? I banked up the fire—and was warmed by hopes of spring.

Turned at Dark

A Bonus Shadow Falls Short Story

Author: C. C. Hunter

Publisher: St. Martin's Griffin

ISBN:

Category: Young Adult Fiction

Page: 32

View: 114

Turned at Dark: A Bonus Shadow Falls Short Story Independent and strong-willed Della Tsang did not believe in ghosts, until she sees her dead cousin in a dark alley. She did not believe in vampires, until she turns into one. Should she follow her vampire cousin's lead and walk away from everything she knows, or join Shadow Falls, a camp for special teens? This short story from C.C. Hunter gives readers a look into Della's history—a must-read for Shadow Falls fans.

The Ethics of Tourism Development

Author: Rosaleen Duffy

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 208

View: 782

Drawing upon a variety of important philosophical traditions, this book develops an original perspective on the relations between ethical, economic and aesthetic values in a tourism context. It considers the ethical/political issues arising in many areas of tourism development, including: the profound cultural and environmental impacts on tourist destinations the reciprocity (or lack of) in host-guest relations the (un)fair distribution of benefits and revenues the moral implications of issues such as sex tourism, staged authenticity and travel to oppressive regimes. The book concludes with a detailed investigation of the potential and pitfalls of ecotourism, sustainable tourism and community-based tourism, as examples of what is sometimes termed 'ethical tourism.' Until now, the ethical issues that surround tourism development have received little academic attention. Explaining philosophical arguments without the use of excessive jargon, this fascinating book interweaves theory and practice, aided by the use of text boxes to explain key terms in ethics, politics, and tourism development, and drawing on contemporary case studies from South Africa, Mexico, Zambia, Honduras, Ethiopia and Madagascar.

127 Hours

Between a Rock and a Hard Place

Author: Aron Ralston

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 368

View: 576

On Sunday April 27, 2003, 27-year old Aron Ralston set off for a day's hiking in the Utah canyons. Dressed in a t-shirt and shorts, Ralston, a seasoned climber, figured he'd hike for a few hours and then head off to work. 40 miles from the nearest paved road, he found himself on top of an 800-pound boulder. As he slid down and off of the boulder it shifted, trapping his right hand against the canyon wall. No one knew where he was; he had little water; he wasn't dressed correctly; and the boulder wasn't going anywhere. He remained trapped for five days in the canyon: hypothermic at night, de-hydrated and hallucinating by day. Finally, he faced the most terrible decision of his life: braking the bones in his wrist by snapping them against the boulder, he hacked through the skin, and finally succeeded in amputating his right hand and wrist. The ordeal, however, was only beginning. He still faced a 60-foot rappell to freedom, and a walk of several hours back to his car - along the way, he miraculously met a family of hikers, and with his arms tourniqued, and blood-loss almost critical, they heard above them the whir of helicopter blades; just in time, Aron was rescued and rushed to hospital. Since that day, Aron has had a remarkable recovery. He is back out on the mountains, with an artificial limb; he speaks to select groups on his ordeal and rescue; and amazingly, he is upbeat, positive, and an inspiration to all who meet him. This is the account of those five days, of the years that led up to them, and where he goes from here. It is narrative non-fiction at its most compelling.

The Ethics of Tourism Development

Author: Mick Smith

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 195

View: 364

Drawing upon a variety of important philosophical traditions, this book develops an original perspective on the relations between ethical, economic and aesthetic values in a tourism context. It considers the ethical/political issues arising in many areas of tourism development, including: the profound cultural and environmental impacts on tourist destinations the reciprocity (or lack of) in host-guest relations the (un)fair distribution of benefits and revenues the moral implications of issues such as sex tourism, staged authenticity and travel to oppressive regimes. The book concludes with a detailed investigation of the potential and pitfalls of ecotourism, sustainable tourism and community-based tourism, as examples of what is sometimes termed 'ethical tourism.' Until now, the ethical issues that surround tourism development have received little academic attention. Explaining philosophical arguments without the use of excessive jargon, this fascinating book interweaves theory and practice, aided by the use of text boxes to explain key terms in ethics, politics, and tourism development, and drawing on contemporary case studies from South Africa, Mexico, Zambia, Honduras, Ethiopia and Madagascar.