Culture of Complaint

The Fraying of America

Author: Robert Hughes

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN:

Category: Arts and society

Page: 210

View: 198

Criticizes Pat Buchanan, Pat Robertson, Jessie Helms, and Ronald Reagan, political correctness, academic obsessions with theory, the art world, American infrastructure, and other targets

Culture of Complaint

The Fraying of America

Author: Robert Hughes

Publisher: Harvill Press

ISBN:

Category: Arts and society

Page: 176

View: 451

In this witty and belligerent polemic Robert Hughes inspects and dismantles the core elements of the contemporary American ethos. To the left, he skewers political correctness, Afro-centrism and academic obsession with theory. To the right, he fires broadsides at free-market capitalist demagogy. Hughes is superbly scathing about politically correct shibboleths which are idle gestures rather than real solutions to the problems of racism and sexism; he identifies the confusion between thinking and feeling which bedevils much debate and which leads people to equate intellectual disagreement with personal attack; he uses his own experiences as an art critic and historian to launch a blistering attack on many of the trends in contemporary art. Hughes identifies a hollowness at the cultural core of America and, in this lucid and invigorating diagnosis of a great nation at odds with itself, he has written a masterpiece of robust polemic.

Unpopular Culture

The Ritual of Complaint in a British Bank

Author: John Weeks

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 166

View: 365

When you start a new job, you learn how things are done in the company, and you learn how they are complained about too. Unpopular Culture considers why people complain about their work culture and what impact those complaints have on their organizations. John Weeks based his study on long-term observations of the British Armstrong Bank in the United Kingdom. Not one person at this organization, he found, from the CEO down to the junior clerks, had anything good to say about its corporate culture. And yet, despite all the griping—and despite high-profile efforts at culture change—the way things were done never seemed fundamentally to alter. The organization was restructured, jobs redefined, and processes redesigned, but the complaining remained the same. As Weeks demonstrates, this is because the everyday standards of behavior that regulate complaints curtail their effectiveness. Embarrass someone by complaining in a way that is too public or too pointed, and you will find your social standing diminished. Complain too loudly or too long, and your coworkers might see you as contrary. On the other hand, complain too little and you may be seen as too stiff or just too strange to be trusted. The rituals of complaint, Weeks shows, have powerful social functions.

The People's State

Author: Mary Fulbrook

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 136

What was life really like for East Germans, effectively imprisoned behind the Iron Curtain? The headline stories of Cold War spies and surveillance by the secret police, of political repression and corruption, do not tell the whole story. After the unification of Germany in 1990 many East Germans remembered their lives as interesting, varied, and full of educational, career, and leisure opportunities: in many ways “perfectly ordinary lives.” Using the rich resources of the newly-opened GDR archives, Mary Fulbrook investigates these conflicting narratives. She explores the transformation of East German society from the ruins of Hitler's Third Reich to a modernizing industrial state. She examines changing conceptions of normality within an authoritarian political system, and provides extraordinary insights into the ways in which individuals perceived their rights and actively sought to shape their own lives. Replacing the simplistic black-and-white concept of “totalitarianism” by the notion of a “participatory dictatorship,” this book seeks to reinstate the East German people as actors in their own history.

Barcelona

Author: Robert Hughes

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 592

View: 842

A monumentally informed and irresistibly opinionated guide to the most un-Spanish city in Spain, from the bestselling author of The Fatal Shore. In these pages, Robert Hughes scrolls through Barcelona's often violent history; tells the stories of its kings, poets, magnates, and revolutionaries; and ushers readers through municipal landmarks that range from Antoni Gaudi's sublimely surreal cathedral to a postmodern restaurant with a glass-walled urinal. The result is a work filled with the attributes of Barcelona itself: proportion, humor, and seny—the Catalan word for triumphant common sense.

Unpopular Culture

The Ritual of Complaint in a British Bank

Author: John R. Weeks

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 176

View: 585

When you start a new job, you learn how things are done in the company, and you learn how they are complained about too. Unpopular Culture considers why people complain about their work culture and what impact those complaints have on their organizations. John Weeks based his study on long-term observations of the British Armstrong Bank in the United Kingdom. Not one person at this organization, he found, from the CEO down to the junior clerks, had anything good to say about its corporate culture. And yet, despite all the griping—and despite high-profile efforts at culture change—the way things were done never seemed fundamentally to alter. The organization was restructured, jobs redefined, and processes redesigned, but the complaining remained the same. As Weeks demonstrates, this is because the everyday standards of behavior that regulate complaints curtail their effectiveness. Embarrass someone by complaining in a way that is too public or too pointed, and you will find your social standing diminished. Complain too loudly or too long, and your coworkers might see you as contrary. On the other hand, complain too little and you may be seen as too stiff or just too strange to be trusted. The rituals of complaint, Weeks shows, have powerful social functions.

Information Technology and Organizational Transformation

History, Rhetoric and Preface

Author: JoAnne Yates

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 367

View: 352

This book provides one of the first clear-headed assessments of information technology and organizational transformation. Its virtue is not so much in its recognition of the importance of the subject; speculations on this topic have been rampant for more than a decade. Rather, it is unusual and unusually useful, because it avoids speculation in favor of conceptually coherent accounts grounded in empirical study of actual organizations. The chapters contained in this volume move beyond the superficial glorification of information technology as an extraordinary instrument of social change, and straight to the heart of the mechanisms of change as they play out in everyday organizational life. In the process, they reaffirm that the real story of information technology in organizations is more about people than about technology. Taken together, they provide an important contribution to the intellectual foundations of one of the most interesting developments in decades.

A Culture of Corruption

Everyday Deception and Popular Discontent in Nigeria

Author: Daniel Jordan Smith

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 263

View: 260

Publisher description

The Spectacle of Skill

New and Selected Writings of Robert Hughes

Author: Robert Hughes

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 688

View: 878

“I am completely an elitist, in the cultural but emphatically not the social sense. I prefer the good to the bad, the articulate to the mumbling, the aesthetically developed to the merely primitive, and full to partial consciousness. I love the spectacle of skill, whether it’s an expert gardener at work, or a good carpenter chopping dovetails . . . I don’t think stupid or ill-read people are as good to be with as wise and fully literate ones. I would rather watch a great tennis player than a mediocre one . . . Consequently, most of the human race doesn’t matter much to me, outside the normal and necessary frame of courtesy and the obligation to respect human rights. I see no reason to squirm around apologizing for this. I am, after all, a cultural critic, and my main job is to distinguish the good from the second-rate.” Robert Hughes wrote with brutal honesty about art, architecture, culture, religion, and himself. He translated his passions—of which there were many, both positive and negative—brilliantly, convincingly, and with vitality and immediacy, always holding himself to the same rigorous standards of skill, authenticity, and significance that he did his subjects. There never was, and never will be again, a voice like this. In this volume, that voice rings clear through a gathering of some of his most unforgettable writings, culled from nine of his most widely read and important books. This selection shows his enormous range and gives us a uniquely cohesive view of both the critic and the man. Most revealing, and most thrilling for Hughes’s legions of fans, are the never-before-published pages from his unfinished second volume of memoirs. These last writings show Robert Hughes at the height of his powers and can be read only with pleasure and a tinge of sadness that his extraordinary voice is no longer here to educate us as well as to clarify and define our world. From the Hardcover edition.

A Jerk on One End

Reflections of a Mediocre Fisherman

Author: Robert Hughes

Publisher: Ballantine Books

ISBN:

Category: Reference

Page: 126

View: 399

A leading art and cultural critic combines memoir, history, folklore, adventure, philosophical meditation, and personal reflection in an evocative celebration of the sport of fishing. By the author of The Fatal Shore.

America in White, Black, and Gray

A History of the Stormy 1960s

Author: Klaus P. Fischer

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 452

View: 931

Numerous studies on various aspects of the issues of the 1960s have been written over the past 35 years, but few have so successfully integrated the many-sided components into a coherent, synthetic, and reliable book that combines good storytelling with sound scholarly analysis.

Eloquence in Trouble : The Poetics and Politics of Complaint in Rural Bangladesh

The Poetics and Politics of Complaint in Rural Bangladesh

Author: James M. Wilce Assistant Professor of Anthropology Northern Arizona University

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 320

View: 213

Eloquence in Trouble captures the articulation of several troubled lives in Bangladesh as well as the threats to the very genres of their expression, lament in particular. The first ethnography of one of the most spoken mother tongues on earth, Bangla, this study represents a new approach to troubles talk, combining the rigor of discourse analysis with the interpretive depth of psychological anthropology. Its careful transcriptions of Bangladeshi troubles talk will disturb some readers and move others--beyond past academic discussion of personhood in South Asia.

The Shock of the New

Author: Robert Hughes

Publisher: Knopf

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 448

View: 451

A beautifully illustrated hundred-year history of modern art, from cubism to pop and avant-guard. More than 250 color photos. From the Trade Paperback edition.

The Grand Chorus of Complaint

Authors and the Business Ethics of American Publishing

Author: Michael J. Everton

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 256

View: 500

An engaging study of authorship, ethics, and book publishing in 18th- and 19th-century America, The Grand Chorus of Complaint considers the uneasy relationship between art and commerce with readings of correspondence, newspaper articles, and works by Thomas Paine, Herman Melville, and Fanny Fern.

Leading for Powerful Learning

A Guide for Instructional Leaders

Author: Angela Breidenstein

Publisher: Teachers College Press

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 153

View: 852

Supporting teacher learning is a complicated and challenging task. This much-awaited book offers a practical, research-based framework for thinking about instructional leadership, along with the necessary resources and tools for improving practice. The authors identify specific structures, formats, and strategies that an instructional leader can use to support new and veteran principals and teacher leaders. They then discuss ways to think about which structures are most appropriate for particular settings, offering suggestions on the most effective way to work with these structures. This unique book combines theory with best practices to create a vision of how 21st-century instructional leaders can improve education for all students. This practical book: Describes a unique, adult learning framework.Includes a variety of tools and protocols that leaders can use to support teacher learning in schools, districts, departments, and teams.Offers instructional leaders both theory and practice-the what to do and also the why and how.Addresses a broad spectrum of instructional leaders at the district, school, and university level. “Students everywhere deserve teachers and administrators who have read this book, and who enact the ideas in it. It is a must read for principals, district level administrators, teacher leaders, instructional coaches and mentors - anyone charged with leading the learning of adults in their schools.” —Gene Thompson-Grove, Educational Consultant and Board Member, SchoolReform Initiative “Leading for Powerful Learning is the book every school leader needs. It provides the essential tools for carrying out what is arguably the school leader's most difficult task: supporting the learning of the teachers with whom they work. The authors’ insights and practical wisdom, drawn from their decades of experience in schools, will be useful not only to formal school leaders but to those serving as leaders in more informal ways.” —Tina Blythe, Harvard Graduate School of Education

Critical Models

Interventions and Catchwords

Author: Theodor W. Adorno

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 448

View: 505

Critical Models combines into a single volume two of Adorno's most important postwar works — Interventions: Nine Critical Models (1963) and Catchwords: Critical Models II (1969). Written after his return to Germany in 1949, the articles, essays, and radio talks included in this volume speak to the pressing political, cultural, and philosophical concerns of the postwar era. The pieces in Critical Models reflect the intellectually provocative as well as the practical Adorno as he addresses such issues as the dangers of ideological conformity, the fragility of democracy, educational reform, the influence of television and radio, and the aftermath of fascism. This new edition includes an introduction by Lydia Goehr, a renowned scholar in philosophy, aesthetic theory, and musicology. Goehr illuminates Adorno's ideas as well as the intellectual, historical, and critical contexts that shaped his postwar thinking.

Goya

Author: Robert Hughes

Publisher: Random House

ISBN:

Category: Artists

Page: 429

View: 592

The starting point of this journey through Goya's life in 18th-century Spain is Hughes' own first encounter with the artist's work when he was a student in Australia. The remainder of the book charts the artist's entire career, describing his painted and graphic oeuvre within its historial context. Particular attention is paid to Goya's patrons, his favourite themes (portraits, scenes of warfare and terror, satirical prints and so on), his criticism of the Catholic Church and encounters with the Inquisition, his fierce anti-war stance and his reputation in his lifetime. What emerges is a picture of an artist deeply engaged with life around him and fully committed to documenting it with an unflinching eye for truth and injustice.

The Fatal Shore

Author: Robert Hughes

Publisher: Random House

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 720

View: 121

An award-winning epic on the birth of Australia In 1787, the twenty-eighth year of the reign of King George III, the British Government sent a fleet to colonise Australia. Documenting the brutal transportation of men, women and children out of Georgian Britain into a horrific penal system which was to be the precursor to the Gulag and was the origin of Australia, The Fatal Shore is the definitive, masterfully written narrative that has given its true history to Australia. 'A unique phantasmagoria of crime and punishment, which combines the shadowy terrors of Goya with the tumescent life of Dickens' Times

Understanding International Art Markets and Management

Author: Iain Robertson

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 280

View: 183

"Understanding International Art Markets and Management focuses on the visual art market--sculpture, paintings, drawings, prints--and examines the major transitions that have affected this market."--Title page verso.

Out of the Ashes

Reparation for Victims of Gross and Systematic Human Rights Violations

Author: Koen Feyter

Publisher: Intersentia nv

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 522

View: 970

Over the last decade, the issue of reparation for victims of gross and systematic human rights violations has given rise to intense debates at the national and the international level. Discussions particularly arise in post-conflict situations characterised by serious violations of human rights, such as genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes, and other forms of injustice of the past. Crucial questions include: what harm inflicted to victims warrants reparation? when and how to repair the harm? who is eligible for reparation and who has the duty to repair? These and other questions raise many challenging issues for theory and practice. This volume contains the contributions presented at an international conference in Brussels, in February 2005, on the right to reparation for victims of serious human rights violations. It also includes the final report of a research project undertaken jointly at the Universities of Antwerp (UA) and Leuven (K.U.Leuven) between 2000 and 2004 on the right to reparation in international law for victims of gross and systematic human rights violations, both from a legal and a socio-political perspective. The present volume is aimed at academics, policy-makers, national and international courts and tribunals, the legal professions, and civil society at large.