Cuba for the Misinformed

Facts from the Forbidden Island

Author: Mick Winter

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Travel

Page: 270

View: 925

For more than 50 years, the U.S. government and news media have misrepresented the truth about Cuba. This book brings together a fascinating array of fats and anecdotes about Cuba, its government,its people, and the actions the United States has taken against the ell-being of those people. Presented in an encyclopedic forma

Manufacturing the Enemy

The Media War Against Cuba

Author: Keith Bolender

Publisher: Pluto Press (UK)

ISBN:

Category: Cuba

Page: 234

View: 385

How has the US media constructed our understanding of Cuba?

The Cuban Revolution

25 Years Later

Author: Georges A Fauriol

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 88

View: 256

January 1984 marked the 25th anniversary of Fidel Castro’s emergence to power. The Cuban Revolution: 25 Years Later is a product of the CSIS Cuba Project, a long-term effort to focus public as well as policymaker’s attention on Cuba-related affairs. The lead author, Lord Thomas of Swynnerton, is the dean of political-historical studies on Cuba, and author of the encyclopedic Cuba: The Pursuit of Freedom. A great deal of myth surrounds the evolution of Cuba since Castro’s emergence to power over 25 years ago. Some of this myth is the product of official Cuban propaganda; some of it is also due to a generally misinformed American public. Sifting through available data to distinguish between fact and fiction, this book evaluates broadly the impact of Castro’s regime on Cuba itself. Based on the findings of the CSIS Cuba Project, the book draws on the assessments of 18 top Cuban specialists on the political, economic, cuiturai, and social development of Cuba since 1959. In contrast to democracies such as Costa Rica, the equalization of society that has taken place under Castro’s leadership has been accomplished by redistributing existing resources, not by creating new wealth. Moreover, the authors conclude that in politics, culture, and the economy, Cuba under Castro has become and remains rigid, stagnant, enormously militarized, and ideologically absolutist.

The Cuban Missile Crisis

A Critical Reappraisal

Author: Len Scott

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 272

View: 558

This volume brings together a collection of leading international experts to revisit and review our understanding of the Cuban Missile Crisis, via a critical reappraisal of some of the key texts. In October 1962, humankind came close to the end of its history. The risk of catastrophe is now recognised by many to have been greater than realised by protagonists at the time or scholars subsequently. The Cuban missile crisis remains one of the mostly intensely studied moments of world history. Understanding is framed and informed by Cold War historiography, political science and personal experience, written by scholars, journalists, and surviving officials. The emergence of Soviet (later Russian) and other national narratives has broadened the scope of enquiry, while scrutiny of the operational, especially military, dimensions has challenged assumptions about the risk of nuclear war. The Cuban Missile Crisis: A Critical Reappraisal brings together world leading scholars from America, Britain, France, Canada, and Russia to present critical scrutiny of authoritative accounts and to recast assumptions and interpretations. The book aims to provide an essential guide for students of the missile crisis, the diplomacy of the Cold War, and the dynamics of historical interpretation and reinterpretation. Offering original ideas and agendas, the contributors seek to provide a new understanding of the secrets and mysteries of the moment when the world went to the brink of Armageddon. This book will be of great interest to students of the Cuban missile crisis, Cold War Studies, nuclear proliferation, international history and International Relations in general.

Thinking Comprehensively About Education

Spaces of Educative Possibility and their Implications for Public Policy

Author: Ezekiel Dixon-Román

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 288

View: 735

While much is known about the critical importance of educative experiences outside of school, little is known about the social systems, community programs, and everyday practices that can facilitate learning outside of the classroom. Thinking Comprehensively About Education sheds much-needed light on those systems, programs, and practices; conceptualizing education more broadly through a nuanced exploration of: the various spaces where education occurs; the non-dominant practices and possibilities of those spaces; the possibilities of enabling social systems, institutions, and programs of comprehensive education. This original edited collection identifies and describes the resources that enable optimal human learning and development, and offers a public policy framework that can enable a truly comprehensive educational system. Thinking Comprehensively About Education is a must-read for faculty, students, policy analysts, and policymakers.

On Becoming Cuban

Identity, Nationality, and Culture

Author: Louis A. Pérez Jr.

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 608

View: 659

With this masterful work, Louis A. Perez Jr. transforms the way we view Cuba and its relationship with the United States. On Becoming Cuban is a sweeping cultural history of the sustained encounter between the peoples of the two countries and of the ways that this encounter helped shape Cubans' identity, nationality, and sense of modernity from the early 1850s until the revolution of 1959. Using an enormous range of Cuban and U.S. sources--from archival records and oral interviews to popular magazines, novels, and motion pictures--Perez reveals a powerful web of everyday, bilateral connections between the United States and Cuba and shows how U.S. cultural forms had a critical influence on the development of Cubans' sense of themselves as a people and as a nation. He also articulates the cultural context for the revolution that erupted in Cuba in 1959. In the middle of the twentieth century, Perez argues, when economic hard times and political crises combined to make Cubans painfully aware that their American-influenced expectations of prosperity and modernity would not be realized, the stage was set for revolution.

44 Days Backpacking in China

The Middle Kingdom in the 21st Century, with the United States, Europe and the Fate of the World in Its Looking Glass

Author: Jeff J. Brown

Publisher: Createspace Independent Pub

ISBN:

Category: Travel

Page: 392

View: 674

"An intimate social, cultural and political look into historical and modern China, while comparing these observations to the history and current trends of the United States and Europe."--Provided by publisher.

Marketing Dictatorship

Propaganda and Thought Work in Contemporary China

Author: Anne-Marie Brady

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 231

View: 972

There has been rapid growth in biomedical engineering in recent decades, given advancements in medical imaging and physiological modelling and sensing systems, coupled with immense growth in computational and network technology, analytic approaches, visualization and virtual-reality, man-machine interaction and automation. Biomedical engineering involves applying engineering principles to the medical and biological sciences and it comprises several topics including biomedicine, medical imaging, physiological modelling and sensing, instrumentation, real-time systems, automation and control, signal processing, image reconstruction, processing and analysis, pattern recognition, and biomechanics. It holds great promise for the diagnosis and treatment of complex medical conditions, in particular, as we can now target direct clinical applications, research and development in biomedical engineering is helping us to develop innovative implants and prosthetics, create new medical imaging technologies and improve tools and techniques for the detection, prevention and treatment of diseases. The contributing authors in this edited book present representative surveys of advances in their respective fields, focusing in particular on techniques for the analysis of complex biomedical data. The book will be a useful reference for graduate students, researchers and industrial practitioners in computer science, biomedical engineering, and computational and molecular biology.

Henry Watterson and the New South

The Politics of Empire, Free Trade, and Globalization

Author: Daniel S. Margolies

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 352

View: 455

Henry Watterson, editor of the Louisville Courier-Journal during the tumultuous decades between the Civil War and World War I, was one of the most influential and widely read journalists in American history. At the height of his fame in the early twentieth century, Watterson was so well known that his name and image were used to sell cigars and whiskey. A major player in American politics for more than fifty years, Watterson personally knew nearly every president from Andrew Jackson to Woodrow Wilson. Though he always refused to run, the renowned editor was frequently touted as a candidate for the U.S. Senate, the Kentucky governor's office, and even the White House. Shortly after his arrival in Louisville in 1868, Watterson merged competing interests and formed the Courier-Journal, quickly establishing it as the paper of record in Kentucky, a central promoter of economic development in the New South, and a prominent voice on the national political stage. An avowed Democrat in an era when newspapers were openly aligned with political parties, Watterson adopted a defiant independence within the Democratic Party and challenged the Democrats' consensus opinions as much as he reinforced them. In the first new study of Watterson's historical significance in more than fifty years, Daniel S. Margolies traces the development of Watterson's political and economic positions and his transformation from a strident Confederate newspaper editor into an admirer of Lincoln, a powerful voice of sectional reconciliation, and the nation's premier advocate of free trade. Henry Watterson and the New South provides the first study of Watterson's unique attempt to guide regional and national discussions of foreign affairs. Margolies details Watterson's quest to solve the sovereignty problems of the 1870s and to quell the economic and social upheavals of the 1890s through an expansive empire of free trade. Watterson's political and editorial contemporaries variously advocated free silverism, protectionism, and isolationism, but he rejected their narrow focus and maintained that the best way to improve the South's fortunes was to expand its economic activities to a truly global scale. Watterson's New Departure in foreign affairs was an often contradictory program of decentralized home rule and overseas imperialism, but he remained steadfast in his vision of a prosperous and independent South within an American economic empire of unfettered free trade. Watterson thus helped to bring about the eventual bipartisan embrace of globalization that came to define America's relationship with the rest of the world in the twentieth century. Margolies's groundbreaking analysis shows how Watterson's authoritative command of the nation's most divisive issues, his rhetorical zeal, and his willingness to stand against the tide of conventional wisdom made him a national icon.