Cornwall Landscapes

Author: John Such

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Cornwall (England : County)

Page: 128

View: 684

Featuring over 250 photographs, this title explores the popular county of Cornwall. It helps you explore the glorious surfing beaches on the north coast and the sheltered beaches and delightful coves on the south coast. It is suitable for both tourists and residents.

New Spaces for Climate Change

The Societal Construction of Landscapes in Times of a Changing Climate

Author: Vera Köpsel

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 254

View: 516

Vera Köpsel investigates the relevance of local perceptions of landscape and nature for the current topic of adaptation to climate change. She highlights the influence that differing conceptualisations of landscape among actors in environmental management have on their perspectives on climate change and adaptation. Qualitative empirical data from Cornwall (UK) constitutes a valuable foundation for an enhanced theoretical understanding of societal constructions of landscape and their implications for local negotiation processes. Using the example of coastal erosion, the author discusses how contrasting perceptions of a local landscape can significantly complicate consensus‐finding around physical‐material adaptation measures.

The Routledge Companion to Landscape Studies

Author: Peter Howard

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 490

View: 624

Landscape is a vital, synergistic concept which opens up ways of thinking about many of the problems which beset our contemporary world, such as climate change, social alienation, environmental degradation, loss of biodiversity and destruction of heritage. As a concept, landscape does not respect disciplinary boundaries. Indeed, many academic disciplines have found the concept so important, it has been used as a qualifier that delineates whole sub-disciplines: landscape ecology, landscape planning, landscape archaeology, and so forth. In other cases, landscape studies progress under a broader banner, such as heritage studies or cultural geography. Yet it does not always mean the same thing in all of these contexts. The Routledge Companion to Landscape Studies offers the first comprehensive attempt to explore research directions into the many uses and meanings of 'landscape'. The Companion contains thirty-nine original contributions from leading scholars within the field, which have been divided into four parts: Experiencing Landscape; Landscape Culture and Heritage; Landscape, Society and Justice; and Design and Planning for Landscape. Topics covered range from phenomenological approaches to landscape, to the consideration of landscape as a repository of human culture; from ideas of identity and belonging, to issues of power and hegemony; and from discussions of participatory planning and design to the call for new imaginaries in a time of global and environmental crisis. Each contribution explores the future development of different conceptual and theoretical approaches, as well as recent empirical contributions to knowledge and understanding. Collectively, they encourage dialogue across disciplinary barriers and reflection upon the implications of research findings for local, national and international policy in relation to landscape. This Companion provides up-to-date critical reviews of state of the art perspectives across this multifaceted field, embracing disciplines such as anthropology, archaeology, cultural studies, geography, landscape planning, landscape architecture, countryside management, forestry, heritage studies, ecology, and fine art. It serves as an invaluable point of reference for scholars, researchers and graduate students alike, engaging in the field of landscape studies.

Routledge Handbook of Landscape Character Assessment

Current Approaches to Characterisation and Assessment

Author: Graham Fairclough

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 294

View: 297

In this multi-authored book, senior practitioners and researchers offer an international overview of landscape character approaches for those working in research, policy and practice relating to landscape. Over the last three decades, European practice in landscape has moved from a narrow, if relatively straightforward, focus on natural beauty or scenery to a much broader concept of landscape character constructed through human perception, and transcending any of its individual elements. Methods, tools and techniques have been developed to give practical meaning to this idea of landscape character. The two main methods, Landscape Character Assessment (LCA) and Historic Landscape Characterisation (HLC) were applied first in the United Kingdom, but other methods are in use elsewhere in Europe, and beyond, to achieve similar ends. This book explores why different approaches exist, the extent to which disciplinary or cultural specificities in different countries affect approaches to land management and landscape planning, and highlights areas for reciprocal learning and knowledge transfer. Contributors to the book focus on examples of European countries – such as Sweden, Turkey and Portugal – that have adopted and extended UK-style landscape characterisation, but also on countries with their own distinctive approaches that have developed from different conceptual roots, as in Germany, France and the Netherlands. The collection is completed by chapters looking at landscape approaches based on non-European concepts of landscape in North America, Australia and New Zealand. This book has an introductory price of £125/$205 which will last until 3 months after publication - after this time it will revert to £140/$225.

Making a Christian Landscape

The Countryside in Early Medieval Cornwall, Devon and Wessex

Author: Dr. Sam Turner

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 218

View: 120

From the rocky isolation of the Cornish coast to the rolling hills of Devon, from the marshy Somerset Levels to the chalk downlands of eastern Wiltshire and the gentler clay vales of north Wiltshire and Dorset, the countryside of south-west Britain is strikingly varied.

Cornish Bronze Age Ceremonial Landscapes C. 2500-1500 BC

Author: Andy M. Jones

Publisher: British Archaeological Reports Limited

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 170

View: 724

The purpose of this study is to provide some interpretation and synthesis for Cornwall's regional archaeology. Contents: Introduction and Background - structure and methodology, barrow studies, 18th, 19th, 20th and recent research and models; The Later Neolithic Background and the role of Beakers in Cornwall - comparative studies, ceremonial sites and ritual traditions; The Evidence from the Barrows - dating, the Watch Hill Barrow and Needham's chronology; Barrow Cemeteries and their Landscape; The Role of Bronze Age Barrow Cemeteries in Cornwall - 4 case studies; Devon; Cornish Ceremonial Landscapes - New Interpretations. Appendices include lists of terminology and excavated barrows.

Memory, Place and Identity

The Cultural Landscapes of Cornwall

Author: Garry Tregidga

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Cornwall (England : County)

Page: 142

View: 858

How does the past relate to the present? Why are particular places remembered through time? What is the role of landscape in the construction of identity? This book investigates these questions in relation to Cornwall. It brings together a team of scholars drawn from a range of disciplines including archaeology, history, literature and media studies. Memory, Place and Identity seeks to develop the field of Cornish and Celtic Studies by engaging with wider trends in both Public History and Cultural Memory. Specific topics covered include the prehistoric cliff castles of West Penwith, language and identity in Mousehole, nineteenth century politics in Truro, cultural narratives of surfing at Newquay and border identity in the Tamar Valley.

Bodmin Moor: The industrial and post-medieval landscapes

Author: Peter C. Herring

Publisher: Historic England Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 208

View: 937

Following on from the original 1994 volume which mapped and recorded the prehistoric and medieval landscape of Bodmin Moor, this second volume completes a comprehensive basic record of this archaeologically rich granite upland area by reporting on its important industrial and later post-medieval features and landscapes. A 1:25 000 map accompanies the text.

Extreme Landscapes of Leisure

Not a Hap-Hazardous Sport

Author: Dr Patrick Laviolette

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN:

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 226

View: 496

In recent years, there has been an increased engagement throughout the social sciences with the study of extreme places and practices. Dangerous games and adventure tours have shifted from being marginal, exotic or mad to being more than merely acceptable. They are now exemplary, mainstream even: there are a variety of new types, increasing numbers of people are doing them and they are being appropriated and have infiltrated more and more contexts. This book argues that hazardous sports and adventure tourism have become rather paradoxical. As a set of activities where players and holidaymakers are closer to death or danger than they would otherwise be, they are the complete opposite of normal games or vacations. Adventure sports and tours reverse the general definition of a holiday as being an escape from the seriousness of everyday life, as in most cases, they are innately serious, requiring as they do 'life or death' decision-making. Beginning with the rise in colonial explorations and moving on to consider the Dangerous Sports Club of Oxford, this book examines the increasing phenomena of adventure sports such as bungy jumping, cliff jumping or 'tomb-stoning', surfing and parkour within a framework of positive risk. It explores how certain assumptions about knowledge, agency, the body and nature are beginning to coalesce around newly developing spheres of social relations. Additionally, extreme games have become activities that are germane to the dawning of green social thought and so the book also addresses issues that deal with the intimate connections that exist between pleasure and the moral responsibility towards the environment.

Interpreting the Landscape

Landscape Archaeology and Local History

Author: Michael Aston

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 168

View: 114

Most places in Britain have had a local history written about them. Up until this century these histories have addressed more parochial issues, such as the life of the manor, rather than explaining the features and changes in the landscape in a factual manner. Much of what is visible today in Britain's landscape is the result of a chain of social and natural processes, and can be interpreted through fieldwork as well as from old maps and documents. Michael Aston uses a wide range of source material to study the complex and dynamic history of the countryside, illustrating his points with aerial photographs, maps, plans and charts. He shows how to understand the surviving remains as well as offering his own explanations for how our landscape has evolved.

Bronze Age Landscapes

Tradition and Transformation

Author: Joanna Brück

Publisher: Oxbow Books Limited

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 231

View: 872

This volume is a collection of essays, which exemplify the range and diversity of work currently being undertaken on the regional landscapes of the British Bronze Age and the progress which has been made in both theoretical and interpretive debate. Together these papers reflect the vibrancy of current research and promote a closer marriage of landscape, site and material culture studies. CONTENTS: Settlement in Scotland during the Second Millennium BC (P Ashmore) ; Place and Space in the Cambridgeshire Bronze Age (T Malim) ; Exploring Bronze Age Norfolk: Longham and Bittering (T Ashwin) ; Ritual Activity at the Foot of the Gog Magog Hills, Cambridge (M Hinman) ; The Bronze Age of Manchester Airport: Runway 2 (D Garner) ; Place and Memory in Bronze Age Wessex (D Field) ; Bronze Age Agricultural Intensification in the Thames Valley and Estuary (D Yates) ; The 'Community of Builders': The Barleycroft Post Alignments (C Evans and M Knight) ; 'Breaking New Ground': Land Tenure and Fieldstone Clearance during the Bronze Age (R Johnston) ; Tenure and Territoriality in the British Bronze Age: A Question of Varying Social and Geographical Scales (W Kitchen) ; A Later Bronze Age Landscape on the Avon Levels: Settlement: Settlement, Shelters and Saltmarsh at Cabot Park (M Locock) ; Reading Business Park: The Results of Phases 1 and 2 (A Brossler) ; Leaving Home in the Cornish Bronze Age: Insights into Planned Abandonment Processes (J A Nowakowski) ; Body Metaphors and Technologies of Transformation in the English Middle and Late Bronze Age (J Bruck) ; A Time and a Place for Bronze (M Barber) ; Firstly, Let's get Rid of Ritual (C Pendleton) ; Mining and Prospection for Metals in Early Bronze Age Britain - Making Claims within the Archaeological Landscape (S Timberlake) ; The Times, They are a Changin': Experiencing Continuity and Development in the Early Bronze Age Funerary Rituals of Southwestern Britain (M A Owoc) ; Round Barrows in a Circular World: Monumentalising Landscapes in Early Bronze Age Wessex (A Watson) ; Enduring Images? Image Production and Memory in Earlier Bronze Age Scotland (A Jones) ; Afterward: Back to the Bronze Age

Geography and Memory

Explorations in Identity, Place and Becoming

Author: Owain Jones

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 272

View: 839

This collection shifts the focus from collective memory to individual memory, by incorporating new performative approaches to identity, place and becoming. Drawing upon cultural geography, the book provides an accessible framework to approach key aspects of memory, remembering, archives, commemoration and forgetting in modern societies.

Devonshire and Cornwall

Illustrated from Original Draiwings with Historical and Topographical Descriptions

Author: John Britton

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 776

Cornwall from Above

Author: John Such

Publisher: Alison Hodge Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Cornwall (England : County)

Page: 79

View: 895

Featuring some of the aerial photographs Cornwall, this work reveals colours, textures and patterns of land, sea and sky - some natural, others man-made. It aims to offer a different perspective on the imprint of human activity on this ancient environment.

Cornwall

The Cultural Construction of Place

Author: Ella Westland

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Cornwall (England : County)

Page: 168

View: 405

This work provides a historical analysis of Cornwall and its culture.

Medieval Devon and Cornwall

Shaping an Ancient Countryside

Author: Sam Turner

Publisher: Windgather Press is

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 530

The countryside of Devon and Cornwall preserves an unusually rich legacy from its medieval past. This book explores the different elements which go to make up this historic landscape - the chapels, crosses, castles and mines; the tinworks and strip fields; and above all, the intricately worked counterpane of hedgebanks and winding lanes. Between AD 500 and 1700, a series of revolutions transformed the structure of the South West Peninsula's rural landscape. The book tells the story of these changes, and also explores how people experienced the landscape in which they lived: how they came to imbue places with symbolic and cultural meaning. Contributors include: Ralph Fyfe on the pollen evidence of landscape change; Sam Turner on the Christian landscape; Peter Herring on both strip fields and Brown Willy, Bodmin Moor; O. H. Creighton and J. P. Freeman on castles; Phil Newman on tin working; and Lucy Franklin on folklore and imagined landscapes.

Landscapes of the National Trust

Author: Stephen Daniels

Publisher: National Trust

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 304

View: 123

The third in the bestselling series of Houses of the National Trust and Gardens of the National Trust, this is a richly illustrated book providing new perspectives on the British landscape. From the dramatic hills of the Lake District to the mysterious fens of eastern England and the beaches and coves of Cornwall, landscapes provide the settings for our daily lives, as well as an important part of our identity. The inspiration for artists, writers and film-makers, our landscapes are cultural, man-made creations far more than we may be aware. But how much do we know about how these landscapes came into being? How were different sorts of landscapes valued in the past? And how can landscapes today and in the future best adapt to the ever-changing world in which we live? Chapters include The Art of Landscape, Ancient Places, Homes and Gardens, Lost in the Woods, Open Country and Shifting Shores. Landscapes of the National Trust will appeal to all those who care about the past, present and future of the British landscape and is superbly illustrated throughout with stunning photographs.