Conservation and Biology of Small Populations

The Song Sparrows of Mandarte Island

Author: James N. M. Smith

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN:

Category: Nature

Page: 260

View: 332

This book explores the factors affecting the survival of small populations. As the human impact on Earth expands, populations of many wild species are being squeezed into smaller and smaller habitats. As a consequence, they face an increasing threat of extinction. National and international conservation groups rush to add these populations, species and sub-species to their existing endangered and threatened lists. In nations with strong conservation laws, listing often triggers elaborate plans to rescue declining populations and restore their habitats. The authors review these theoretical ideas, the existing data, and explore the question: how well do small and isolated populations actually perform? Their case study group is the song sparrows of Mandarte Island, British Columbia. This population is small enough and isolated enough so that all individuals can be uniquely marked and their survival and reproduction monitored over many generations. This is one of the strongest long-term ecological studies of a contained vertebrate population, now in its 31st year.

A Primer of Conservation Genetics

Author: Richard Frankham

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Nature

Page: 220

View: 469

This concise, entry level text provides an introduction to the importance of genetic studies in conservation and presents the essentials of the discipline in an easy-to-follow format, with main points and terms clearly highlighted. The authors assume only a basic knowledge of Mendelian genetics and simple statistics, making the book accessible to those with a limited background in these areas. Connections between conservation genetics and the wider field of conservation biology are interwoven throughout the book. Worked examples are provided throughout to help illustrate key equations and glossary and suggestions for further reading provide additional support for the reader. Many beautiful pen and ink portraits of endangered species are included to enhance the text. Written for short, introductory level courses in genetics, conservation genetics and conservation biology, this book will also be suitable for practising conservation biologists, zoo biologists and wildlife managers.

Reintroduction Biology

Integrating Science and Management

Author: John G. Ewen

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 520

View: 738

This book aims to further advance the field of reintroduction biology beyond the considerable progress made since the formation of the IUCN/SSC Re-introduction Specialist Group. Using an issue-based framework that purposely avoids a structure based on case studies the book's central theme is advocating a strategic approach to reintroduction where all actions are guided by explicit theoretical frameworks based on clearly defined objectives. Issues covered include husbandry and intensive management, monitoring, and genetic and health management. Although taxonomically neutral there is a recognised dominance of bird and mammal studies that reflects the published research in this field. The structure and content are designed for use by people wanting to bridge the research-management gap, such as conservation managers wanting to expand their thinking about reintroduction-related decisions, or researchers who seek to make useful applied contributions to reintroduction.

Quantitative Genetics in the Wild

Author: Anne Charmantier

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 288

View: 623

Although the field of quantitative genetics - the study of the genetic basis of variation in quantitative characteristics such as body size, or reproductive success - is almost 100 years old, its application to the study of evolutionary processes in wild populations has expanded greatly over the last few decades. During this time, the use of 'wild quantitative genetics' has provided insights into a range of important questions in evolutionary ecology, ranging from studies conducting research in well-established fields such as life-history theory, behavioural ecology and sexual selection, to others addressing relatively new issues such as populations' responses to climate change or the process of senescence in natural environments. Across these fields, there is increasing appreciation of the need to quantify the genetic - rather than just the phenotypic - basis and diversity of key traits, the genetic basis of the associations between traits, and the interaction between these genetic effects and the environment. This research activity has been fuelled by methodological advances in both molecular genetics and statistics, as well as by exciting results emerging from laboratory studies of evolutionary quantitative genetics, and the increasing availability of suitable long-term datasets collected in natural populations, especially in animals. Quantitative Genetics in the Wild is the first book to synthesize the current level of knowledge in this exciting and rapidly-expanding area. This comprehensive volume also offers exciting perspectives for future studies in emerging areas, including the application of quantitative genetics to plants or arthropods, unraveling the molecular basis of variation in quantitative traits, or estimating non-additive genetic variance. Since this book deals with many fundamental questions in evolutionary ecology, it should be of interest to graduate, post-graduate students, and academics from a wide array of fields such as animal behaviour, ecology, evolution, and genetics.

Conservation Biology

Foundations, Concepts, Applications

Author: Fred Van Dyke

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 478

View: 248

Fred Van Dyke’s new textbook, Conservation Biology: Foundations, Concepts, Applications, 2nd Edition, represents a major new text for anyone interested in conservation. Drawing on his vast experience, Van Dyke’s organizational clarity and readable style make this book an invaluable resource for students in conservation around the globe. Presenting key information and well-selected examples, this student-friendly volume carefully integrates the science of conservation biology with its implications for ethics, law, policy and economics.

Viable Populations for Conservation

Author: Michael E. Soulé

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Nature

Page: 189

View: 549

This book addresses research in the rapidly developing integration of conservation biology with population biology.

Introduction to Conservation Genetics

Author: Richard Frankham

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Nature

Page: 617

View: 926

Genetic diversity, biodiversity, population management.

Conservation Biology and the Black-footed Ferret

Author: Ulysses S. Seal

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN:

Category: Nature

Page: 302

View: 282

The presentations and discussions clarified certain controversial issues in conservation and wildlife biology, including factors influencing the viability of small wild and captive populations, minimum viable population sizes in wild and captive populations, and the consequences of small founder numbers for recovery of the species. These papers were useful in the decision-making stage of the recovery program and will assist in the return of the species to the wild-the goal of a recovery program.

Free-Ranging Dogs and Wildlife Conservation

Author: Matthew E. Gompper

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 360

View: 745

Dogs are the world's most common and widespread carnivores and are nearly ubiquitous across the globe. The vast majority of these dogs, whether owned or un-owned, pure-bred or stray, spend a large portion of their life as unconfined, free-roaming animals, persisting at the interface of human and wildlife communities. Their numbers are particularly large throughout the developing world, where veterinary care and population control are often minimal and human populations are burgeoning. This volume brings together the world's experts to provide a comprehensive, unifying, and accessible review of the effects of dogs on native wildlife species. With an emphasis on addressing how free-ranging dogs may influence wildlife management and native species of conservation concern, chapters address themes such as the global history and size of dog populations, dogs as predators, competitors, and prey of wildlife, the use of dogs as hunting companions, the role of dogs in maintaining diseases of wildlife, and the potential for dogs to hybridize with wild canid species. In addition, the potential role of dogs as mediators of conservation conflict is assessed, including the role of dogs as livestock guardians, the potential for dogs to aid researchers in locating rare wildlife species of conservation interest, and the importance of recognizing that some populations of dogs such as dingoes have a long history of genetic isolation and are themselves important conservation concerns. A common theme woven throughout this volume is the potential for dogs to mediate how humans interact with wildlife and the recognition that the success of wildlife conservation and management efforts are often underpinned by understanding and addressing the potential roles of free-ranging dogs in diverse natural ecosystems. Free-Ranging Dogs and Wildlife Conservation is aimed at professional wildlife and conservation ecologists, managers, graduate students, and researchers with an interest in human-dog-wildlife interactions. It will also be of relevance and use to dog welfare researchers, veterinary scientists, disease ecologists, and readers with an interest in the interface of domestic animals and wildlife.

Conservation and the Genetics of Populations

Author: Fred W. Allendorf

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 632

View: 720

Loss of biodiversity is among the greatest problems facing theworld today. Conservation and the Genetics of Populationsgives a comprehensive overview of the essential background,concepts, and tools needed to understand how genetic informationcan be used to conserve species threatened with extinction, and tomanage species of ecological or commercial importance. Newmolecular techniques, statistical methods, and computer programs,genetic principles, and methods are becoming increasingly useful inthe conservation of biological diversity. Using a balance of dataand theory, coupled with basic and applied research examples, thisbook examines genetic and phenotypic variation in naturalpopulations, the principles and mechanisms of evolutionary change,the interpretation of genetic data from natural populations, andhow these can be applied to conservation. The book includesexamples from plants, animals, and microbes in wild and captivepopulations. This second edition contains new chapters on Climate Change andExploited Populations as well as new sections on genomics, geneticmonitoring, emerging diseases, metagenomics, and more. One-third ofthe references in this edition were published after the firstedition. Each of the 22 chapters and the statistical appendix have aGuest Box written by an expert in that particular topic (includingJames Crow, Louis Bernatchez, Loren Rieseberg, Rick Shine, andLisette Waits). This book is essential for advanced undergraduate and graduatestudents of conservation genetics, natural resource management, andconservation biology, as well as professional conservationbiologists working for wildlife and habitat managementagencies. Additional resources for this book can be found at: ahref="http://www.wiley.com/go/allendorf/populations"www.wiley.com/go/allendorf/populations/a.