Confessions of a Crap Artist

Author: Philip K. Dick

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 256

View: 998

"A funny, horribly accurate portrait of a life in California in the Fifties."—Rolling Stone Jack Isidore doesn't see the world like most people. According to his brother-in-law Charlie, he’s a crap artist, obsessed with his own bizarre theories and ideas, which he fanatically records in his many notebooks. He is so grossly unequipped for real life that his sister and brother-in-law feel compelled to rescue him from it. But while Fay and Charlie Hume put on a happy face for the world, they prove to be just as sealed off from reality, in thrall to obsessions that are slightly more acceptable than Jack's but a great deal uglier. Their constant fighting and betrayals threaten their own marriage and the relationships of everyone around them. When they bring Jack into their home, he finds himself in the middle of a maelstrom of suburban angst from which he might not be able to escape. Confessions of a Crap Artist is one of Philip K. Dick's most accomplished novels, and the only non–science fiction novel published in his lifetime.

Confessions of a Crap Artist--Jack Isidore (of Seville, Calif.)

A Chronicle of Verified Scientific Fact, 1945-1959

Author: Philip K. Dick

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 248

View: 709

In Dick's only non-science fiction novel published in his lifetime, a man is obsessed with crackpot ideas, like the Earth being hollow, while his sister and brother-in-law are obsessed with creating the ideal American home. But will their obsessions overtake them? And which is worse?

Confessions of a Crap Artist--Jack Isidore (of Seville, Calif.)

A Chronicle of Verified Scientific Fact, 1945-1959 : a Novel

Author: Philip K. Dick

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Science fiction, American

Page: 171

View: 678

"A funny, horribly accurate portrait of a life in California in the Fifties."--"Rolling Stone" Jack Isidore doesn't see the world like most people. According to his brother-in-law Charlie, he's a crap artist, obsessed with his own bizarre theories and ideas, which he fanatically records in his many notebooks. He is so grossly unequipped for real life that his sister and brother-in-law feel compelled to rescue him from it. But while Fay and Charlie Hume put on a happy face for the world, they prove to be just as sealed off from reality, in thrall to obsessions that are slightly more acceptable than Jack's but a great deal uglier. Their constant fighting and betrayals threaten their own marriage and the relationships of everyone around them. When they bring Jack into their home, he finds himself in the middle of a maelstrom of suburban angst from which he might not be able to escape. "Confessions of a Crap Artist" is one of Philip K. Dick's most accomplished novels, and the only non-science fiction novel published in his lifetime.

The Search for Philip K. Dick

Author: Anne R Dick

Publisher: Tachyon Publications

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 279

View: 848

Offering an intimate perspective on the life of an important, prolific author, this revealing biography uncovers the inner workings of a cult figure through his tumultuous relationship with his third wife. Brilliant and charismatic, Philip K. Dick was known as a loyal friend, father, and husband, as well as a talented science fiction writer. His six-year marriage to the woman he described as “the love of his life” and his intellectual equal was full of passion—the meeting of soul mates. But behind the façade of an untroubled life was a man struggling with his demons, unable to trust anyone, and reliant upon his charm to navigate his increasingly dark reality and descent into drugs and madness. Exposing personal details of their married life as well as the ways he continued to haunt her even after their relationship collapsed, Anne Dick provides thorough research combined with personal memories of this mysterious man.

The Man Whose Teeth Were All Exactly Alike

Author: Philip K. Dick

Publisher: Tor Books

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 304

View: 945

The Man Whose Teeth Were All Exactly Alike was written by Philip K. Dick in the winter and spring of 1960, in Point Reyes Station, California. In the sequence of Dick's work, The Man Whose Teeth was written immediately after Confessions of a Crap Artist; the next book Dick wrote was The Man in the High Castle, the Hugo Award–winning science fiction novel that ushered in the next stage of Dick's career. This novel, Dick said, is about Leo Runcible, "a brilliant, civicminded liberal Jew living in a rural WASP town in Marin County, California." Runcible, a real estate agent involved in a local battle with a neighbor, finds what look like Neanderthal bones and dreams of rising real estate prices because of the publicity. At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.

The Twisted Worlds of Philip K. Dick

A Reading of Twenty Ontologically Uncertain Novels

Author: Umberto Rossi

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 316

View: 963

Philip K. Dick was one of the most popular science fiction novelists of the 20th century, but the contradictory and wily writer has troubled critics who attempt encompassing explanations of his work. This book examines Dick’s writing through the lens of ontological uncertainty, providing a comparative map of his oeuvre, tracing both the interior connections between books and his allusive intertextuality. Topics covered include time travel, alternate worlds, androids and simulacra, finite subjective realities and schizophrenia. Twenty novels are explored in detail, including titles that have received scant critical attention. Some of his most important short stories and two of his realist novels are also examined, providing a general introduction to Dick’s body of work.

Colonialism and the Emergence of Science Fiction

Author: John Rieder

Publisher: Wesleyan University Press

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 200

View: 402

This is the first full-length study of emerging Anglo-American science fiction’s relation to the history, discourses, and ideologies of colonialism and imperialism. Nearly all scholars and critics of early science fiction acknowledge that colonialism is an important and relevant part of its historical context, and recent scholarship has emphasized imperialism’s impact on late Victorian Gothic and adventure fiction and on Anglo-American popular and literary culture in general. John Rieder argues that colonial history and ideology are crucial components of science fiction’s displaced references to history and its engagement in ideological production. He proposes that the profound ambivalence that pervades colonial accounts of the exotic “other” establishes the basic texture of much science fiction, in particular its vacillation between fantasies of discovery and visions of disaster. Combining original scholarship and theoretical sophistication with a clearly written presentation suitable for students as well as professional scholars, this study offers new and innovative readings of both acknowledged classics and rediscovered gems. Includes discussion of works by Edwin A. Abbott, Edward Bellamy, Edgar Rice Burroughs, John W. Campbell, George Tomkyns Chesney, Arthur Conan Doyle, H. Rider Haggard, Edmond Hamilton, W. H. Hudson, Richard Jefferies, Henry Kuttner, Alun Llewellyn, Jack London, A. Merritt, Catherine L. Moore, William Morris, Garrett P. Serviss, Mary Shelley, Olaf Stapledon, and H. G. Wells.

Philip K. Dick

Exhilaration and Terror of the Postmodern

Author: Christopher Palmer

Publisher: Liverpool University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 259

View: 214

Once solely the possession of fans and buffs, the SF author Philip K Dick is now finding a much wider audience, as the success of the films Blade Runner and Minority Report shows. The kind of world he predicted in his funny and frightening novels and stories is coming closer to most of us: shifting realities, unstable relations, uncertain moralities. Philip K. Dick: Exhilaration and Terror of the Postmodern examines a wide range of Dick's work, including his short stories and posthumously published realist novels. Christopher Palmer analyzes the puzzling and dazzling effects of Dick's fiction, and argues that at its heart is a clash between exhilarating possibilities of transformation, and a frightening lack of ethical certainties. Dick's work is seen as the inscription of his own historical predicament, the clash between humanism and postmodernism being played out in the complex forms of the fiction. The problem is never resolved, but Dick's ways of imagining it become steadily more ingenious and challenging.

The Blade Runner Experience

The Legacy of a Science Fiction Classic

Author: Will Brooker

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 240

View: 742

Since its release in 1982, Ridley Scott's Blade Runner, based on Philip K. Dick's novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, has remained a cult classic through its depiction of a futuristic Los Angeles; its complex, enigmatic plot; and its underlying questions about the nature of human identity. The Blade Runner Experience: The Legacy of a Science Fiction Classic examines the film in a broad context, examining its relationship to the original novel, the PC game, the series of sequels, and the many films influenced by its style and themes. It investigates Blade Runner online fandom and asks how the film's future city compares to the present-day Los Angeles, and it revisits the film to pose surprising new questions about its characters and their world.

A Life of Philip K. Dick

The Man Who Remembered the Future

Author: Anthony Peake

Publisher: Arcturus Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page:

View: 512

Philip K. Dick was a writer who drew upon his own life to address the nature of drug abuse, paranoia, schizophrenia and transcendental experiences of all kinds. More than 10 major Hollywood movies are based on his work including Blade Runner, A Scanner Darkly, Total Recall, Minority Report and The Adjustment Bureau. Born in 1929 just before the Great Crash, Dick's twin sister died when she was a month old and his parents were divorced by the time he was three. In his teens, he began to show the first signs of mental instability, but by then he was already producing fiction writing of a visionary nature.