Comparing Postcolonial Literatures

Dislocations

Author: A. Bery

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 283

View: 613

Bringing together a range of critics working on the hispanic and francophone as well as anglophone post-colonial regions, this book aims to dislocate some of the commonly accepted cultural, linguistic and geographical boundaries that have previously informed post-colonial studies. Collected essays include: cross-cultural comparisons from areas as diverse as Africa, Ireland and Latin America; analysis of specific texts as sites of border conflict; and revisions of post-colonial theoretical frameworks. A timely questioning of the categories of a critical field at the point when it is becoming increasingly comparative, this volume seeks to suggest more dynamic ways of working in post-colonial cultural studies.

Comparing Postcolonial Diasporas

Author: M. Keown

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 230

View: 949

Bringing together a group of intellectuals from a number of disciplines, this collection breaks new ground within the field of postcolonial diaspora studies, moving beyond the Anglophone bias of much existing scholarship by investigating comparative links between a range of Anglophone, Francophone, Hispanic and Neerlandophone cultural contexts.

Cultural Translation and Postcolonial Poetry

Author: A. Bery

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 221

View: 480

This book uses the framework of cultural translation to explore the work of six significant modern writers from Ireland, India, Australia and the Caribbean. Written in an accessible and approachable style, it will be of interest not only to specialists in postcolonial literatures, but also readers of modern and contemporary poetry more generally.

Concepts of Home and Belonging in Postcolonial Literature Compared in the Novels "Small Island" by Andrea Levy and "White Teeth" by Zadie Smith

Author: Christina Heckmann

Publisher: GRIN Verlag

ISBN:

Category: Home

Page: 28

View: 379

Seminar paper from the year 2006 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Literature, grade: 2,00, University of Gottingen (Seminar fur Englische Philologie ), course: Multiethnic Britain, language: English, abstract: 1. Introduction 1.1. Brief introduction to home and belonging as a general idea Home has a significant function in our lives. Thinking of home we associate notions like shelter and comfort and when we come home we want to feel safe and welcome. John McLeod argues in this sense that "to be 'at home' is to occupy a location where we are welcome, where we can be with people very much like ourselves." We are looking for who we are, where we come from and try to find our place in life. When one is born in a country but moves to another where is one's home country then? This question is hard to answer, because migration is always a process which implies a struggle of identities. When the 2nd generation is born in the host country- where do they belong if the host country does not accept them as full members? The term home is highly complicated in a complex and multicultural world like ours. 1.2. Procedure and approach of my analyses I have centered my term paper on an attempt to identify and characterize the concepts of home and belonging in postcolonial literature. Comparing how the idea of home and belonging is presented in the novels White Teeth by Zadie Smith and Small Island by Andrea Levy, I have tried a text- extrinsic approach. Furthermore, I have analysed the authors' intentions with regard to the time of publication and the time of the narrative. However, the main aspect of my analyses is which concepts of home and belonging exist and which of them can be found in the novels of my comparison. I have chosen White Teeth because it is a novel that deals with the colonial past and the postcolonial present and I have selected Small Island because it is a novel that deals with migrat"

A kutya

Author:

Publisher: LQA Test Account

ISBN:

Category: Comparative literature

Page: 137

View: 167

New Postcolonial Dialectics

An Intercultural Comparison of Indian and Nigerian English Plays

Author:

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 253

View: 308

This book closes a gap in postcolonial theory through its scrutiny of how four Indian and Nigerian English plays that are situated in national traditions reframed their own cultural terrain in international terms. It maps the trajectory that Indian and Nigerian dramatists, such as Rabindranath Tagore, Wole Soyinka and Badal Sircar, adopted as they moved from the specific to the bicultural to the global. The intercultural dialectic validated here provides a protean comparative scaffolding that evolves out of, and reflects, the interculturality of the literatures it is critiquing, allowing the book to be an entry point, practical guide, and reference for those interested in studying and comparing literatures from Asia and Africa written or translated into English. Its approach and dialectic can also be expanded for use in comparative literary studies on all intercultural encounters.

The Future of Postcolonial Studies

Author: Chantal Zabus

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 277

View: 125

The Future of Postcolonial Studies celebrates the twenty-fifth anniversary of the publication of The Empire Writes Back by the now famous troika - Bill Ashcroft, Gareth Griffiths and Helen Tiffin. When The Empire Writes Back first appeared in 1989, it put postcolonial cultures and their post-invasion narratives on the map. This vibrant collection of fifteen chapters by both established and emerging scholars taps into this early mapping while merging these concerns with present trends which have been grouped as: comparing, converting, greening, post-queering and utopia. The postcolonial is a centrifugal force that continues to energize globalization, transnational, diaspora, area and queer studies. Spanning the colonial period from the 1860s to the present, The Future of Postcolonial Studies ventures into other postcolonies outside of the Anglophone purview. In reassessing the nation-state, language, race, religion, sexuality, the environment, and the very idea of 'the future,' this volume reasserts the notion that postcolonial is an "anticipatory discourse" and bears testimony to the driving energy and thus the future of postcolonial studies.

The Postcolonial Gothic

Haunting and Historicity in the Literature After Empire

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 255

View: 356

In my dissertation, The Postcolonial Gothic: Haunting and Historicity in the Literature after Empire, I engage in a comparative analysis of colonial and postcolonial literatures that can be read as Gothic because they harbor within themselves themes of spectrality, repressed trauma, and the out of jointness of time. The basis for my comparison is recent critical theory, particularly the works of Jacques Derfda, Sigmund Freud, Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari who offer critical awareness of what it means to live with--or how to exorcise--the phantoms that haunt us. This dissertation, accordingly, takes a very powerful and universal figure for human experience--the ghost--and studies its recurrence in colonial and postcolonial relationships. I follow this spirit--which manifests itself in many forms--as it floats through colonial history. The frequency of ghosts and vampires in postcolonial narratives functions as a response against British and other colonial writers who used similar imagery in their representation of the Other during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. The Postcolonial Gothic first traces a genealogy of the phantom in British literature, starting from Defoe's Robinson Crusoe, through to its imitators in Victorian boys' stories, stopping at the Brontes' creation of colonial fantasy worlds in their juvenilia. The second part of the dissertation turns to postcolonial literature where there is a deep problematization, mimicry, and perversion of the ghost--of these Gothic images--by writers such as J.M. Coetzee, Derek Walcott, and Toni Morrison. The Postcolonial Gothic is, then, a literary sea journey across colonial space and time--an examination of what Derek Walcott calls the Sea as a crypt that possesses and locks away history--a slow tour of the ghosts and detritus of colonialism and the consequent hauntings that structure and plague postcolonialism.

Scottish Literature and Postcolonial Literature: Comparative Texts and Critical Perspectives

Comparative Texts and Critical Perspectives

Author: Michael Gardiner

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 288

View: 128

The first full-length study of Scottish literature using a post-devolutionary understanding of postcolonial studies. Using a comparative model and spanning over two hundred years of literary history from the 18th Century to the contemporary, this collection of 19 new essays by some of the leading figures in the field presents a range of perspectives on Scottish and postcolonial writing. The essays explore Scotland's position on both sides of the colonial divide and also its role as instigator of a devolutionary process with potential consequences for British Imperialism.

Comparing the Literatures

Literary Studies in a Global Age

Author: David Damrosch

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 392

View: 285

From a leading figure in comparative literature, a major new survey of the field that points the way forward for a discipline undergoing rapid changes Literary studies are being transformed today by the expansive and disruptive forces of globalization. More works than ever circulate worldwide in English and in translation, and even national traditions are increasingly seen in transnational terms. To encompass this expanding literary universe, scholars and teachers need to expand their linguistic and cultural resources, rethink their methods and training, and reconceive the place of literature and criticism in the world. In Comparing the Literatures, David Damrosch integrates comparative, postcolonial, and world-literary perspectives to offer a comprehensive overview of comparative studies and its prospects in a time of great upheaval and great opportunity. Comparing the Literatures looks both at institutional forces and at key episodes in the life and work of comparatists who have struggled to define and redefine the terms of literary analysis over the past two centuries, from Johann Gottfried Herder and Germaine de Staël to Edward Said, Gayatri Spivak, Franco Moretti, and Emily Apter. With literary examples ranging from Ovid and Kālidāsa to James Joyce, Yoko Tawada, and the internet artists Young-Hae Chang Heavy Industries, Damrosch shows how the main strands of comparison—philology, literary theory, colonial and postcolonial studies, and the study of world literature—have long been intertwined. A deeper understanding of comparative literature's achievements, persistent contradictions, and even failures can help comparatists in literature and other fields develop creative responses to today's most important questions and debates. Amid a multitude of challenges and new possibilities for comparative literature, Comparing the Literatures provides an important road map for the discipline's revitalization.

Poetry, Print, and the Making of Postcolonial Literature

Author: Nathan Suhr-Sytsma

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page:

View: 214

Poetry, Print, and the Making of Postcolonial Literature reveals an intriguing history of relationships among poets and editors from Ireland and Nigeria, as well as Britain and the Caribbean, during the mid-twentieth-century era of decolonization. The book explores what such leading anglophone poets as Seamus Heaney, Christopher Okigbo, and Derek Walcott had in common: 'peripheral' origins and a desire to address transnational publics without expatriating themselves. The book reconstructs how they gained the imprimatur of both local and London-based cultural institutions. It shows, furthermore, how political crises challenged them to reconsider their poetry's publics. Making substantial use of unpublished archival material, Nathan Suhr-Sytsma examines poems in print, often the pages on which they first appeared, in order to chart the transformation of the anglophone literary world. He argues that these poets' achievements cannot be extricated from the transnational networks through which their poems circulated - and which they in turn remade.

Postcolonial Literature

Author: Dave Gunning

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 240

View: 161

Introduces postcolonial literary studies through close readings of a wide range of fiction and poetryThis guide places the literary works themselves at the centre of its discussions, examining how writers from Africa, Australasia, the Caribbean, Canada, Ireland, and South Asia have engaged with the challenges that beset postcolonial societies. Dave Gunning discusses many of the most-studied works of postcolonial literature, from Chinua Achebes Things Fall Apart to Salman Rushdies The Satanic Verses, as well as works by more recent writers like Chris Abani, Tahmima Anam and Shani Mootoo. Each chapter explores a key theme through drawing together works from various times and places. The book concludes with an extensive guide to further reading and tips on how to write about postcolonial literature successfully.Key FeaturesClose analysis of texts including, Sam Selvons The Lonely Londoners, J.M Coetzees Disgrace, Roddy Doyles A Star Called Henry, Shani Mootoos Cereus Blooms at Night, Tsitsi Dangarembgas Nervous Conditions, Zadie Smiths White Teeth, Mohsin Hamids The Reluctant Fundamentalist, Tahmima Anams A Golden Age, Michael Ondaatjes Anils Ghost, and Amitav Ghoshs In an Antique Land, as well as poetry by Derek Walcott, Eavan Boland, Agha Shahid Ali, Chris Abani and others.Discusses important new themes in postcolonial literature including global Islam, postcolonial sexualities and the representation of military conflict.Includes a Chronology, a Guide to Further Reading, and Tips on Writing about Postcolonial Literature.

Spectral Nationality

Passages of Freedom from Kant to Postcolonial Literatures of Liberation

Author: Pheng Cheah

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 408

View: 482

This far-ranging and ambitious attempt to rethink postcolonial theory's discussion of the nation and nationalism brings the problems of the postcolonial condition to bear on the philosophy of freedom. Going against orthodoxy, Pheng Cheah retraces the universal-rationalist foundations and progressive origins of political organicism in the work of Kant and its development in philosophers in the German tradition such as Fichte, Hegel, and Marx.

Language and Translation in Postcolonial Literatures

Multilingual Contexts, Translational Texts

Author: Simona Bertacco

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 234

View: 562

This collection gathers together a stellar group of contributors offering innovative perspectives on the issues of language and translation in postcolonial studies. In a world where bi- and multilingualism have become quite normal, this volume identifies a gap in the critical apparatus in postcolonial studies in order to read cultural texts emerging out of multilingual contexts. The role of translation and an awareness of the multilingual spaces in which many postcolonial texts are written are fundamental issues with which postcolonial studies needs to engage in a far more concerted fashion. The essays in this book by contributors from Australia, New Zealand, Zimbabwe, Cyprus, Malaysia, Quebec, Ireland, France, Scotland, the US, and Italy outline a pragmatics of language and translation of value to scholars with an interest in the changing forms of literature and culture in our times. Essay topics include: multilingual textual politics; the benefits of multilingual education in postcolonial countries; the language of gender and sexuality in postcolonial literatures; translational cities; postcolonial calligraphy; globalization and the new digital ecology.

Word & Image in Colonial and Postcolonial Literatures and Cultures

Author:

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 424

View: 887

Verbal imagery and visual images as well as the intricate relationships between verbal and visual representations have long shaped the imagination and the practice of intercultural relationships. The contributions to this volume take a fresh look at the ideology of form, especially the gendered and racial implications of the gaze and the voice in various media and intermedial transformations. Analyses of how culturally specific forms of visual and verbal expression are individually understood and manipulated complement reflections on the potential and limitations of representation. The juxtaposition of visual and verbal signifiers explores the gap between them as a space beyond cultural boundaries. Topics treated include: Caliban; English satirical iconotexts; Oriental travel writing and illustration; expatriate description and picturesque illustration of Edinburgh; ethnographic film; African studio photography; South African cartoons; imagery, ekphrasis, and race in South African art and fiction; face and visuality, representation and memory in Asian fiction; Bollywood; Asian historical film; Asian-British pop music; Australian landscape in painting and fiction; indigenous children's fiction from Aotearoa New Zealand, Canada, and the USA; Canadian photography; Native Americans in film. Writers and artists discussed include: Philip Kwame Apagya; the Asian Dub Foundation; Breyten Breytenbach; Richard Burton; Peter Carey; Gurinder Chadha; Daniel Chodowiecki; J.M. Coetzee; Ashutosh Gowariker; Patricia Grace; W. Greatbatch; Hogarth; Francis K. Honny; Jim Jarmusch; Robyn Kahukiwa; Seydou Keita; Thomas King; Vladyana Krykorka; Alfred Kubin; Michael Arvaarluk Kusugak; Kathleen and Michael Lacapa; Laszlo Lakner; George Littlechild; Ken Lum; Franz Marc; Zakes Mda; Ketan Mehta; M.I.A. (Maya Arulpragasam); Timothy Mo; William Kent Monkman; Lady Mary Wortley Montagu; John Hamilton Mortimer; Sidney Nolan; Jean Rouch; Salman Rushdie; William Shakespeare; Robert Louis Stevenson; Richard Van Camp; Zapiro.

Post-Colonial Literatures

Expanding the Canon

Author: Deborah L. Madsen

Publisher: Pluto Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 237

View: 403

The book explores what characterises a a good lifea and how this idea has been affected by globalisation and neoliberalism."

Crabtracks

Progress and Process in Teaching the New Literatures in English : Essays in Honour of Dieter Riemenschneider

Author: Gordon Collier

Publisher: Rodopi

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 409

View: 328

The essays in this collection celebrate the signal achievement of Dieter Riemenschneider in helping found and consolidate the study of postcolonial anglophone literatures in Germany and Europe. As well as poems, a short story, drawings of the Indian scene (the first, and abiding, focus of this scholar's work), and 'letters' of reminiscence (one quite grave), there are revealing contributions of a literary-historical nature on the establishment of anglophone (especially African) literatures as an academic discipline within Germany, the UK, and Northern Europe generally, as well as a group of searching reflections on such topics of postcolonial import as globalization and the applicability of models to the literature of the indigene in Canada and Australia. The largest section is devoted to individual topics, each treatment implicitly keyed to approaches to the teaching of New Literatures texts. Writers covered include Anita Desai (landscape and memory), Salman Rushdie (painting in The Moor's Last Sigh), Charlotte Brontë (imperial discourse in Jane Eyre), Derek Walcott (Omeros and cultural cohabitation), and Witi Ihimaera (his rewriting of Katherine Mansfield). Topics dealt with include music and radio in West Africa, the African literary 'hit parade', the New Zealand prose poem, Canadian and Australian war fiction, the Middle Passage in the American and Caribbean novel, Paul Theroux's uneasy relations with V.S. Naipaul, and the colonial discourse of illness and recuperation. The volume closes with Dieter Riemenschneider's very first and most recent critical essays, the one a classic on Mulk Raj Anand, the other a challenging and doubtless controversial thesis on postcolonial minority writing. A select bibliography of Riemenschneider's work (books, edited publications, journal articles and book contributions, reviews and broadcasts) rounds off this substantial collection.

Tragedy and Postcolonial Literature

Author: Ato Quayson

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 346

View: 473

Provides a new way of reading Western tragedy alongside texts from the postcolonial world so as to cross-illuminate each other.

Planned Violence

Post/Colonial Urban Infrastructure, Literature and Culture

Author: Elleke Boehmer

Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 349

View: 134

This book brings the insights of social geographers and cultural historians into a critical dialogue with literary narratives of urban culture and theories of literary cultural production. In so doing, it explores new ways of conceptualizing the relationship between urban planning, its often violent effects, and literature. Comparing the spatial pasts and presents of the post-imperial and post/colonial cities of London, Delhi and Johannesburg, but also including case studies of other cities, such as Chicago, Belfast, Jerusalem and Mumbai, Planned Violence investigates how that iconic site of modernity, the colonial city, was imagined by its planners — and how this urban imagination, and the cultural and social interventions that arose in response to it, made violence a part of the everyday social life of its subjects. Throughout, however, the collection also explores the extent to which literary and cultural productions might actively resist infrastructures of planned violence, and imagine alternative ways of inhabiting post/colonial city spaces.