Chinese and Indian Strategic Behavior

Growing Power and Alarm

Author: George J. Gilboy

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page:

View: 942

This book offers an empirical comparison of Chinese and Indian international strategic behavior. It is the first study of its kind, filling an important gap in the literature on rising Indian and Chinese power and American interests in Asia. The book creates a framework for the systematic and objective assessment of Chinese and Indian strategic behavior in four areas: (1) strategic culture; (2) foreign policy and use of force; (3) military modernization (including defense spending, military doctrine and force modernization); and (4) economic strategies (including international trade and energy competition). The utility of democratic peace theory in predicting Chinese and Indian behavior is also examined. The findings challenge many assumptions underpinning Western expectations of China and India.

Hinterlands and Commodities

Place, Space, Time and the Political Economic Development of Asia over the Long Eighteenth Century

Author:

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 284

View: 872

In Hinterlands and Commodities, well-known historians and an economist examine perennially important questions concerning temporal and spatial relationships among central places, hinterlands, commodities, and political economic developments in Asia and the Global economy over the long eighteenth century.

Strange Parallels: Volume 2, Mainland Mirrors: Europe, Japan, China, South Asia, and the Islands

Southeast Asia in Global Context, c.800–1830

Author: Victor Lieberman

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page:

View: 401

Blending fine-grained case studies with overarching theory, this book seeks both to integrate Southeast Asia into world history and to rethink much of Eurasia's premodern past. It argues that Southeast Asia, Europe, Japan, China, and South Asia all embodied idiosyncratic versions of a Eurasian-wide pattern whereby local isolates cohered to form ever larger, more stable, more complex political and cultural systems. With accelerating force, climatic, commercial, and military stimuli joined to produce patterns of linear-cum-cyclic construction that became remarkably synchronized even between regions that had no contact with one another. Yet this study also distinguishes between two zones of integration, one where indigenous groups remained in control and a second where agency gravitated to external conquest elites. Here, then, is a fundamentally original view of Eurasia during a 1,000-year period that speaks to both historians of individual regions and those interested in global trends.

Governance and democracy in Asia

Author: Takashi Inoguchi

Publisher: Trans Pacific Pr

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 201

View: 545

This book examines what citizens think about governance and democracy and the actual practices of governments in Asia, one of the most dynamic and divergent regions of the world. Using public opinion surveys and other evidence, the authors investigate such topics as government perception, human rights, democracy, and political development for a total of seven countries located in East, Southeast, and South Asia-China, India, Japan, Malaysia, South Korea, Taiwan, and Thailand. Governance and Democracy in Asia contains detailed country studies, extensive cross-country comparisons, and a wealth of new data. It will appeal to scholars and students of Asian politics, public opinion, political development, and democratization.

The East Moves West

India, China, and Asia's Growing Presence in the Middle East

Author: Geoffrey Kemp

Publisher: Brookings Institution Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 326

View: 538

While traditionally powerful Western economies are treading water at best, beset by crises in banking, housing, and employment, industrial growth and economic development are exploding in China and India. The world's two most populous nations are the biggest reasons for Asia's growing footprint on other global regions. The increasing size and impact of that footprint are especially important in the Middle East, an economic, religious, and geopolitical linchpin. The East Moves West details the growing interdependence of the Middle East and Asia and projects the likely ramifications of this evolving relationship. It also examines the role of Pakistan, Japan, and South Korea in the region. Geoffrey Kemp, a longtime analyst of global security and political economy, compares and contrasts Indian and Chinese involvement in the Middle East. He stresses an embedded historical dimension that gives India substantially more familiarity and interest in the region—India was there first, and it has maintained that head start. Both nations, however, are clearly on the rise and leaving an indelible mark on the Middle East, and that enhanced influence has international ramifications for the United States and throughout the world. Does the emergence of these Asian giants—with their increasingly huge need for energy—strengthen the case for cooperative security, particularly in the maritime arena? After all, safe and open sea-lanes remain an essential component of mutually beneficial intercontinental trade, making India and China increasingly dependent on safe passage of oil tankers. Or will we see reversion to more traditional competition and even conflict, given that the major Asian powers themselves have so many unresolved problems and that the future of the U.S. presence in the area is uncertain. Kemp believes the United States will remain the dominant military power in the region but will have to share some security responsibilities with the Asians, especially in the Indian Ocean.

Civil Society Networks in China and Vietnam

Informal Pathbreakers in Health and the Environment

Author: A. Wells-Dang

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 234

View: 464

This book brings a fresh, original approach to understand social action in China and Vietnam through the conceptual lens of informal environmental and health networks. It shows how citizens in non-democratic states actively create informal pathways for advocacy and the development of functioning civil societies.

India and China

The Battle between Soft and Hard Power

Author: Dr. S K Shah

Publisher: Vij Books India Pvt Ltd

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 304

View: 212

Since soft power is an intangible component of a state’s power, it is difficult to measure its actual impact. The advantages of hard power such as military and economic resources are that they can be measured and compared, and their direct effects are more or less palpable. It is easy for example to compare Indian and Chinese military expenditures. It is impossible however to quantify the appeal of a country’s values, culture, institutions or achievements, an appeal which is inherently subjective and therefore contested and fluctuating. Since the early 2000s, in keeping with India’s rise on the world stage, the scholarly and policy communities in India and abroad have witnessed a steady increase in writing on India’s soft power. Many of these assessments are optimistic, placing faith in India’s potential as a civilizational great power with considerable resources arising from its culture, domestic ideology and diplomacy. The uniqueness of this book hence lies in the author's way of reconstructing the chapter under review by delving deep into the areas of the subject.

Challenges to Effective Multilateralism

Comparing Asian and European Experiences

Author: Bates Gill

Publisher: DIANE Publishing

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 19

View: 976

The contrast between Europe¿s and Asia¿s experiences with regional integration and institution-building raises numerous questions about the changing nature of economic integration and multilateral cooperation in the 21st century. Similarities in these trends raise questions about the value of comparing the experiences of Asia and Europe. To date little serious discussion and research about such a comparison has occurred, and dialogue between Asian and EU experts has been equally elusive. The intention of this conference was to fill the gap in the literature, catalyze a more sustained dialogue, and generate policy-relevant recommendations for U.S. policymakers.