Combinatorial Games

Tic-Tac-Toe Theory

Author: József Beck

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Mathematics

Page: 732

View: 270

Traditional game theory has been successful at developing strategy in games of incomplete information: when one player knows something that the other does not. But it has little to say about games of complete information, for example, tic-tac-toe, solitaire and hex. The main challenge of combinatorial game theory is to handle combinatorial chaos, where brute force study is impractical. In this comprehensive volume, Jzsef Beck shows readers how to escape from the combinatorial chaos via the fake probabilistic method, a game-theoretic adaptation of the probabilistic method in combinatorics. Using this, the author is able to determine the exact results about infinite classes of many games, leading to the discovery of some striking new duality principles. Available for the first time in paperback, it includes a new appendix to address the results that have appeared since the book's original publication.

Combinatorial Games

Author: Richard K. Guy

Publisher: American Mathematical Soc.

ISBN:

Category: Mathematics

Page: 233

View: 348

Based on lectures presented at the AMS Short Course on Combinatorial Games, held at the Joint Mathematics Meetings in Columbus in August 1990, the ten papers in this volume will provide readers with insight into this exciting field. Because the book requires very little background, it will likely find a wide audience that includes the amateur interested in playing games, the undergraduate looking for a new area of study, instructors seeking a refreshing area in which to give new courses at both the undergraduate and graduate levels, and graduate students looking for a variety of research topics.In the opening paper, Guy contrasts combinatorial games, which have complete information and no chance moves, with those of classical game theory. Conway introduces a new theory of numbers, including infinitesimals and transfinite numbers, which has emerged as a special case of the theory of games. Guy describes impartial games, with the same options for both players, and the Sprague-Grundy theory. Conway discusses a variety of ways in which games can be played simultaneously. Berlekamp uses the theory of 'hot' games to make remarkable progress in the analysis of Go Endgames.Pless demonstrates the close connection between several impartial games and error-correcting codes. Fraenkel explains the way in which complexity theory is very well illustrated by combinatorial games, which supply a plethora of examples of harder problems than most of those which have been considered in the past. Nowakowski outlines the theory of three particular games - Welter's Game, Sylver Coinage, and Dots-and-Boxes. A list of three dozen open problems and a bibliography of 400 items are appended.

Combinatorial Game Theory

Author: Aaron N. Siegel

Publisher: American Mathematical Soc.

ISBN:

Category: Mathematics

Page: 523

View: 634

Combinatorial game theory is the study of two-player games with no hidden information and no chance elements. The theory assigns algebraic values to positions in such games and seeks to quantify the algebraic and combinatorial structure of their interactions. Its modern form was introduced thirty years ago, with the publication of the classic Winning Ways for Your Mathematical Plays by Berlekamp, Conway, and Guy, and interest has rapidly increased in recent decades. This book is a comprehensive and up-to-date introduction to the subject, tracing its development from first principles and examples through many of its most recent advances. Roughly half the book is devoted to a rigorous treatment of the classical theory; the remaining material is an in-depth presentation of topics that appear for the first time in textbook form, including the theory of misère quotients and Berlekamp's generalized temperature theory. Packed with hundreds of examples and exercises and meticulously cross-referenced, Combinatorial Game Theory will appeal equally to students, instructors, and research professionals. More than forty open problems and conjectures are mentioned in the text, highlighting the many mysteries that still remain in this young and exciting field. Aaron Siegel holds a Ph.D. in mathematics from the University of California, Berkeley and has held positions at the Mathematical Sciences Research Institute and the Institute for Advanced Study. He was a partner at Berkeley Quantitative, a technology-driven hedge fund, and is presently employed by Twitter, Inc.

Lessons in Play

An Introduction to Combinatorial Game Theory

Author: Michael Albert

Publisher: CRC Press

ISBN:

Category: Mathematics

Page: 304

View: 469

Combinatorial games are games of pure strategy involving two players, with perfect information and no element of chance. Starting from the very basics of gameplay and strategy, the authors cover a wide range of topics, from game algebra to special classes of games. Classic techniques are introduced and applied in novel ways to analyze both old and

Combinatorial Games

Author: Elwyn R. Berlekamp

Publisher: American Mathematical Soc.

ISBN:

Category: Mathematics

Page: 233

View: 722

The subject of combinatorics is only slowly acquiring respectability and combinatorial games will clearly take longer than the rest of combinatorics. Perhaps this partly stems from the puritanical view that anything amusing can't possibly involve any worthwhile mathematics. from the Preface.

Combinatorial Game Theory

Surreal Number, Solved Game, Nim, Sprague-grundy Theorem, Nimber, Impartial Game, on Numbers and Games, Col

Author: Books, LLC

Publisher: Books LLC, Wiki Series

ISBN:

Category: Mathematics

Page: 177

View: 752

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 45. Chapters: Surreal number, Solved game, Nim, Sprague-Grundy theorem, Nimber, Impartial game, On Numbers and Games, Col, Shannon switching game, Game complexity, Go and mathematics, Angel problem, Jenga, Octal game, Domineering, Chomp, Genus theory, Map-coloring games, Shannon number, Game tree, Hackenbush, Kayles, Cram, Hot game, Subtract a square, Mis re, Pebble game, Toads and Frogs, Grundy's game, Star, Winning Ways for your Mathematical Plays, Maker-Breaker game, Sylver coinage, Sim, Tiny and miny, Variation, Indistinguishability quotient, Fuzzy game, Clobber, Disjunctive sum, Bulgarian solitaire, Branching factor, Positional game, Generalized game, Mex, Zero game, Partisan game, Null move, Sum of combinatorial games. Excerpt: In mathematics, the surreal number system is an arithmetic continuum containing the real numbers as well as infinite and infinitesimal numbers, respectively larger or smaller in absolute value than any positive real number. The surreals share many properties with the reals, including a total order and the usual arithmetic operations (addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division); as such, they form an ordered field. In a rigorous set theoretic sense, the surreal numbers are the largest possible ordered field; all other ordered fields, such as the rationals, the reals, the rational functions, the Levi-Civita field, the superreal numbers, and the hyperreal numbers, are subfields of the surreals. The surreals also contain all transfinite ordinal numbers reachable in the set theory in which they are constructed. The definition and construction of the surreals is due to John Horton Conway. They were introduced in Donald Knuth's 1974 book Surreal Numbers: How Two Ex-Students Turned on to Pure Mathematics and Found Total Happiness. This book is a mathematical novelette, and is notable as one of the...

Combinatorial Optimization and Applications

First International Conference, COCOA 2007, Xi'an, China, August 14-16, 2007, Proceedings

Author: Andreas Dress

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Computers

Page: 390

View: 638

The papers in this volume were presented at the 1st International Conference on Combinatorial Optimization and Applications (COCOA 2007), held August 12-15, 2007, in Xi'an, China. The topics cover most areas in combinatorial op- mization and applications. Submissions to the conference this year were conducted electronically. A - tal of 114 papers were submitted, of which 29 were accepted. The papers were evaluated by an International Program Committee consisting of Tetsuo Asano, Kyung-Yong Chwa, Bill Chen, Bo Chen, Andreas Dress, Pater Eades, Omer Egecioglu, Rudolf Fleischer, Bin Fu, Mordecai Golin, Ron Graham, Pavol Hell, Xiao-Dong Hu, Marek Karpinski, Minghui Jiang, Michael Langston, Hanno L- mann, Ko-Wei Lih, Andy Mirzaian, Brendan Mumey, Mauricio G.C. Resende, Takao Nishizeki, Mike Steel, Zheng Sun, My T. Thai, Kanliang Wang, Michael Waterman, Gerhard Woeginger, Yinfeng Xu, Boting Yang, Wenan Zang, Alex Zelikovsky and Binhai Zhu. It is expected that most of the accepted papers will appear in a more complete form in scienti'c journals. The submitted papers are from Australia, Canada, China, France, Germany, Greece, Hong Kong, Japan, Korea, Mexico, Poland, Romania, Russia, Switz- land, Tunisia, Turkey and USA. Each paper was evaluated by at least two P- gram Committee members (and in some cases by as many as seven Program Committee members), assisted in some cases by subreferees. In addition to - lected papers, the conference also included two invited presentations, by Bailin Hao and Kurt Mehlhorn, and eight invited papers.

More Games of No Chance

Author: Richard Nowakowski

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Mathematics

Page: 535

View: 451

This 2003 book documents mathematical and computational advances in Amazons, Chomp, Dot-and-Boxes, Go, Chess, Hex, and more.