Clara Schumann

The Artist and the Woman

Author: Nancy Reich

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 416

View: 620

This absorbing and award-winning biography tells the story of the tragedies and triumphs of Clara Wieck Schumann (1819–1896), a musician of remarkable achievements. At once artist, composer, editor, teacher, wife, and mother of eight children, she was an important force in the musical world of her time. To show how Schumann surmounted the obstacles facing female artists in the nineteenth century, Nancy B. Reich has drawn on previously unexplored primary sources: unpublished diaries, letters, and family papers, as well as concert programs. Going beyond the familiar legends of the Schumann literature, she applies the tools of musicological scholarship and the insights of psychology to provide a new, full-scale portrait. The book is divided into two parts. In Part One, Reich follows Clara Schumann's life from her early years as a child prodigy through her marriage to Robert Schumann and into the forty years after his death, when she established and maintained an extraordinary European career while supporting and supervising a household and seven children. Part Two covers four major themes in Schumann's life: her relationship with Johannes Brahms and other friends and contemporaries; her creative work; her life on the concert stage; and her success as a teacher. Throughout, excerpts from diaries and letters in Reich's own translations clear up misconceptions about her life and achievements and her partnership with Robert Schumann. Highlighting aspects of Clara Schumann's personality and character that have been neglected by earlier biographers, this candid and eminently readable account adds appreciably to our understanding of a fascinating artist and woman. For this revised edition, Reich has added several photographs and updated the text to include recent discoveries. She has also prepared a Catalogue of Works that includes all of Clara Schumann's known published and unpublished compositions and works she edited, as well as descriptions of the autographs, the first editions, the modern editions, and recent literature on each piece. The Catalogue also notes Schumann's performances of her own music and provides pertinent quotations from letters, diaries, and contemporary reviews.

The complete correspondence of Clara and Robert Schumann

Author: Clara Schumann

Publisher: Peter Lang Pub Inc

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 488

View: 458

The third volume of The Complete Correspondence of Clara and Robert Schumann contains letters written by Robert Schumann (1810-1856) and Clara Wieck Schumann (1819-1896) between January 1840 and March 1851. The letters preceding the couple's wedding in September 1840 document the last phase of Robert's lawsuit against Friedrich Wieck aimed at obtaining permission to marry. They also include comments on Robert's fondness for lieder and his close friendship with Felix Mendelssohn and Franz Liszt. The letters written when Clara went on tour without her husband, for instance to Copenhangen in 1842, revolve around news about her concerts and her reactions to such famous men as Hans Christian Andersen and Niels Gade. The better part of the letters was written by Clara, while Robert is so occupied with his work that his letters are frequently quite brief. The letters in this volume offer a fresh look at a marriage which earlier biographers have described as problematic. Such a view is not borne out by the correspondence in this volume. The Editor: Eva Weissweiler received her Ph.D. in music and German literature in 1974. Her publications include Women Composers over the Past Five Centuries (Komponistinnen aus 500 Jahren), 1981; Fanny Mendelssohn: Italian Diary (Fanny Mendelssohn: Italienisches Tagebuch), 1982; Fanny Mendelssohn: A Portrait in Letters (Fanny Mendelssohn: Ein Portrat in Briefen), 1985; Clara Schumann: A Biography, 1990; The Son of the Cellist (Der Sohn des Cellisten) 1998; and Eradicated (Ausgemerzt), 1999. Dr. Weissweiler is the editor of the original German edition of The Complete Correspondence of Clara and Robert Schumann (Clara/Robert Schumann: Briefwechsel, KritischeGesamtausgabe), (1984 and 1987, volumes I and II respectively). She lives and works in Cologne, Germany. The Translators: Hildegard Fritsch is Emeritus Professor of Modern and Classical Language Studies at Kent State University, Ohio. She received her Ph.D. in German from Cas

Clara Schumann

Piano Virtuoso

Author: Susanna Reich

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN:

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 118

View: 953

Describes the life of the German pianist and composer who made her professional debut at age nine and who devoted her life to music and to her family. Reprint.

Schumann -- Album for the Young, Op. 68

Author: Robert Schumann

Publisher: Alfred Music Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 80

View: 131

Numerous selections from Schumann's Album for the Young have long been favorites of intermediate students, and few collections fail to include the "Soldier's March," the "Happy Farmer" or the "Wild Horseman." This historically informed edition of the entire collection clearly differentiates the markings of the first edition from Clara Schumann's later-edited version. Discussions of ornamentation and the collection's origin are also included.

Clara Schumann

An Artist's Life Based on Material Found in Diaries and Letters -

Author: Berthold Litzmann

Publisher: Litzmann Press

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 532

View: 478

CLARA SCHUMANN AN ARTIST'S LIFE BASED ON MATERIAL FOUND IN DIARIES AND LETTERS by BY BERTHOLD LITZMANN. Originally published in 1913. TRANSLATOR'S PREFACE: The task of translation can never be a light one, since every language has not only its own peculiar shades of meaning, but also its own peculiar charm a fragrance which evaporates as soon as the national frontier is crossed. This is especially true of the German of Robert Schumann. His delicate, poetic imagination found perfect expression in the language of his hero, Jean Paul, and the endeavour to render his love letters, and still more his poems, in another tongue is foredoomed to failure; the original words alone fitly express the poet's thought In the following pages an attempt has been made to give as far as possible the spirit of the German, but only a poet could hope for success in such an enterprise, and I am conscious of many shortcomings. It is with great pleasure and the warmest gratitude that I acknowledge my indebtedness to Miss BL C. Deneke and to Miss Eugenie Schumann, both of whom read through the manuscript and gave me much valuable advice and criticism. Miss Schumann went through the translation word by word, and to her never wearying patience and consideration is due whatever in it there may be of good. It was unfortunately found necessary to turn the original three volumes into two in the English edition, and by so doing the balance of the whole had necessarily to be re adjusted. Prof. Litzmann in his prefaces explains the principle which underlies the whole work. I have endeavoured to interfere as little as possible with his method, though some Translator's Preface. slight changes were necessary in order to avoid any abrupt break between the volumes, vol. ii of the German edition being divided between the two volumes of the English edition. It is with sincere apologies and deep regret that I have ventured to make what omissions were called for by reason of space, and I have to tender my thanks to Prof. Litzmann for his courtesy in permitting such changes. Cirencester 1912. Grace E. Hadow, PREFACE: The reproach is commonly brought against musical bio graphies that they are monotonous: and indeed the life of the musician has not often afforded much scope for incident or variety. If he be a composer he treads the accustomed course of early struggles, hard-earned victories and posthumous fame: if he be a virtuoso his career is one triumphal progress which leaves little to record except the successive trophies that he has planted and the successive laurels that he has won. The concentration required by his art removes him in some degree from the stir and stress of public events: for the most part he dwells in an ideal city of his own and breathes the more freely when he has shut its gates upon the world. To this it may be added that the biographers of our great musicians have too often tended to merge the historian in the advocate. They are full of a generous enthusiasm for their subject; they are anxious above all things to present it in an attractive light; but they sometimes neglect Cromwell's advice to Sir Peter Lely and spoil their portrait by giving it a classic regularity of feature. No doubt every biographer is something of a partisan; it is no use writing a man's life unless you think well of him: but the worst of all ways to arouse interest in your hero is to represent him on a faultless pala din and to treat as a paynim and a miscreant everyone who ever offered him the least opposition. No man can build the monument of departed greatness if he is using up all the stones to pelt his adversaries. ...

Chamber Music

Author: Robert Schumann

Publisher: Courier Corporation

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 283

View: 267

"A selection of unabridged works from 'Serie IV. F'ur Streichinstrumente' and 'Serie V. F'ur Pianoforte und andere Instrumente' of the Collected Works Edition (Robert Schumann's Werke. Herausgegeben von Clara Schumann), originally published by Breitkopf & H'artel"--T.p. verso.

Clara Schumann

Author: Monica Steegmann

Publisher: Haus Pub

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 154

View: 358

When Clara Schumann was just eighteen she realised 'that I would be unhappy if I were unable to practise my art forever'. She found after her husband Robert Schumann's death, 'how necessary music is in my life - if I had to given it up I should soon perish'. Even when she was seventy, the thought that she might no longer be able to play was completely unbearable: 'How should I go on living if I had to give it up entirely!' Nothing shook her hold on life as strongly as the thought of giving up her music. It was something innate rather than acquired, a form of artistic expression, the language most familiar to her, 'the air in which I breathe. Only music and people could warm my heart' - and in that order.